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Actor Eli Roth gestures as he holds a banner reading "Eli... the king of the red carpet", which he had received from fans, on the "A Dangerous Method" red carpet at the 68th Venice Film Festival Sept. 2, 2011. (Alessandro Garofalo/REUTERS)
Actor Eli Roth gestures as he holds a banner reading "Eli... the king of the red carpet", which he had received from fans, on the "A Dangerous Method" red carpet at the 68th Venice Film Festival Sept. 2, 2011. (Alessandro Garofalo/REUTERS)

TIFF docs and screams: See what’s playing at Midnight Madness and more Add to ...

Fresh frights from Eli Roth and a sex comedy from Japan’s Hitoshi Matsumoto are among the flicks headed to the Toronto International Film Festival, as well as documentaries from Errol Morris and illusionists Penn and Teller.

Lucky McKee and Chris Sivertson’s All Cheerleaders Die will open Midnight Madness, the festival’s late-night cavalcade of horror and offbeat comedies.

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It includes Roth’s The Green Inferno, which centres on a group of college students kidnapped by cannibals in the Amazon, and Matsumoto’s R100, billed as “a wild and hilarious trip into personal sexual fantasy.”

The TIFF Docs slate includes Morris’s portrait of Donald Rumsfeld in The Unknown Known, and the art mystery Tim’s Vermeer, directed by Teller and produced by Penn Jillette.

Canadian-helmed docs include Barry Avrich’s Filthy Gorgeous: The Bob Guccione Story, Jody Shapiro’s Burt’s Buzz, Alan Zweig’s When Jews Were Funny and Alanis Obomsawin’s Hi-Ho Mistahey!

The Toronto International Film Festival runs Sept. 5 to 15.

Over in the City to City program, Yorgos Servetas’s Standing Aside, Watching will kick off a spotlight on Greece.

It follows a woman who moves to a quiet town, unaware of the silent violence that lurks there. She’s soon forced to decide whether to take action or stand aside and watch.

The Midnight Madness program celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, with additional features from Sion Sono’s Why Don’t You Play in Hell? and the debut feature of Hong Kong pop singer Juno Mak, Rigor Mortis.

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