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Paperback reader (Tom Hahn/iStockphoto)
Paperback reader (Tom Hahn/iStockphoto)

Paperbacks

New in paperback: A guide to the latest releases Add to ...

In Other Worlds
SF and the Human Imagination, by Margaret Atwood, Signal Editions, 250 pages, $18.99

Literary icon Margaret Atwood brings her skill and imagination to bear on the subject of science (or speculative) fiction in this collection of essays, lectures and reviews of such writers as Ursula K. Le Guin, George Orwell, H.G. Wells, Aldous Huxley, Jonathan Swift and Marge Piercy, and discusses her own lifelong relationship to the genre.

The Middle Stories
By Sheila Heti, Anansi, 157 pages, $14.95

Thirty short, quick stories about such large, eternal subjects as love, death, joy and relationships, all told in Heti’s distinctive, quirky voice and offbeat sensibility. This edition includes nine stories that were not included in the original publication.

I’ll See You in My Dreams
By William Deverell, McClelland & Stewart, 433 pages, $19.99

Criminal lawyer Arthur Beauchamp is forced to come out of retirement to deal with the fallout from his first case, a 1962 murder trial in which a young native activist was accused of killing a professor – a trial in which Arthur had doubts about the police evidence, and also about his client.

Bill Moyers Journal
The Conversation Continues, by Bill Moyers, New Press, 594 pages, $22.95

A selection of Bill Moyers’s PBS “discussions” with a wide range of prominent personalities, across a wide range of subjects, from Jon Stewart on politics to Michael Pollan on food, David Simon (creator of The Wire) on urban woes, Robert Bly and Nikki Giovanni on poetry, and Barbara Ehrenreich on working Americans.

The Iliad
Translated by Stephen Mitchell, Free Press, 478 pages, $18.99

There is always room for another translation of Homer’s great epic. Here Stephen Mitchell, a noted U.S. classicist and translator, has provided a clean, simple and fast-paced offering of the classic, which was much-praised when published last year.

Manual of Painting and Calligraphy
By José Saramago, translated by Giovanni Pontiero, Mariner, 242 pages, $14.95

José Saramago’s first novel, published in 1976 (and in English in 1994), is a love story and tale of self-discovery set in the last years of Salazar’s dictatorship. A young artist is commissioned to paint a portrait of a powerful industrialist, and learns about himself and the world.

Aurorarama
By Jean-Christophe Valtat, Melville House, 409 pages, $16.95

New Venice, “the pearl of the Arctic,” is a place of great beauty and sophistication, but also of extreme cold, food shortages and drugs, with a rebellious population, secret police, anarchist terrorists and gangsters. Two men, an idealist greenhouse-keeper and an incorrigible woman-chaser, must unravel the city’s secrets and conspiracies.

American Diplomacy
By George F. Kennan, University of Chicago Press, 192 pages, $17

This 60th-anniversary edition of U.S. diplomat and scholar George F. Kennan’s classic text has been expanded and introduced by political scientist John J. Mearsheimer, re-evaluating Kennan’s perceptive analysis of U.S. foreign policy through history and into the Korean War era.

Lost Memory of Skin
By Russell Banks, Vintage Canada, 416 pages, $22

The Professor, a man who has built his life on secrets and lies, forms a partnership with the Kid, who has just served time for an affair with an underaged girl, and is now forbidden to be anywhere near children. But then the Professor’s past re-emerges, and the Kid must reconsider everything he has come to believe.

Crime/Guilt
Stories, by Ferdinand von Schirach, translated by Carol Brown Janeway, Pocket Black Lizard, 286 pages, $16.95

Ferdinand von Schirach, one of Germany’s best known defence attorneys, tellsstories based on his courtroom experiences: taut, emotional tales of ordinary people who commit ordinary crimes.

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