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Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Daniel Radcliffe are shown in a scene from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2. (Jaap Buitendijk)
Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Daniel Radcliffe are shown in a scene from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2. (Jaap Buitendijk)

Movies

Harry Potter casts a spell over Canadian box office Add to ...

Potter power ruled Canada last year, according to statistics released this week by the Motion Picture Theatre Associations of Canada. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2, the eighth and final instalment in the popular movie series, earned just over $43-million to make it the country’s top commercial box-office performer for 2011.

Gross box-office revenue in Canada for the year totalled $1.001-billion, a 3 per cent decline from 2010. Canadian films accounted for about 3 per cent of that, grossing $28.3-million in total, down 16 per cent from the $33.5-million tallied in 2010.

The other big draws in the top five were, like Deathly Hallows, sequels: Transformers: Dark of the Moon ($30.7-million); Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides ($24.5-million); The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn ($22.3-million); and The Hangover Part II ($21-million). Oscar-winner The King’s Speech, released in late 2010, earned just over $17-million in 2011 – 9 per cent of it from the French-language version – to finish 10th.

Top Canadian feature was Starbuck, a made-in-Quebec sperm-donor comedy starring Patrick Huard ( Bon Cop, Bad Cop). Currently up for six Genie Awards, including best picture, Starbuck grossed $3.51-million, most of it from a lengthy theatrical run in Quebec.

As ever, Quebec films, including co-productions, dominated the Canadian side, claiming eight berths in the top 10. Monsieur Lazhar, nominated for best foreign-film honours at this year’s Oscars, finished seventh with a gross of $1.8-million, all of it from Quebec audiences. (The film opened in selected English-language markets last month.) Fourth-ranked Incendies, directed by Denis Villeneuve and nominated for a foreign-film Oscar last year, earned almost $2.1-million in 2011, on top of the $2.75-million grossed in 2010. The best-performing English-language Canadian movie, Barney’s Version, released in late December, 2010, took in $3.01-million from the remainder of its commercial run in 2011. It placed third in the top-10 Canadian releases.

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