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Director Alanis Obomsawin of Hi-Ho Mistahey! speaks during the First Peoples Cinema press conference while director Sarah Spillane of "Around The Block" looks on at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival in Toronto on Friday, Sept. 6, 2013. (Galit Rodan/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Director Alanis Obomsawin of Hi-Ho Mistahey! speaks during the First Peoples Cinema press conference while director Sarah Spillane of "Around The Block" looks on at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival in Toronto on Friday, Sept. 6, 2013. (Galit Rodan/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Watch: The new one-hour documentary Hi-Ho Mistahey! chronicles Attawapiskat's quest for a new school Add to ...

Six years ago, a 14-year-old Cree activist named Shannen Koostachin had the simple but daunting dream of getting a “safe, comfy” school built in the benighted First Nations community of Attawapiskat. Reaching out to children across Canada, she sparked a movement that came to be known as Shannen’s Dream. She was killed in a car crash in 2010, but the movement gained ground, and a school is now scheduled to open this fall. This weekend, in honour of Have a Heart Day, an initiative in support of Canada’s First Nations children, The Globe and Mail is offering streaming of Hi-Ho Mistahey!, a one-hour documentary about the project from veteran filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin.

In Cree, the title means roughly “I love you very much.”

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