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Toronto, Sept. 24/08 - William Thorsell, Director and Chief Executive Officer of The Royal Ontario Museum was on hand today with other delegates to officially announce the exhibition of the Dead Sea Scrolls in Toronto, Ontario Canada. The exhibition will be running at the ROM from June 27, 2009 to January 03, 2010. Photo by Deborah Baic The Globe and Mail (Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
Toronto, Sept. 24/08 - William Thorsell, Director and Chief Executive Officer of The Royal Ontario Museum was on hand today with other delegates to officially announce the exhibition of the Dead Sea Scrolls in Toronto, Ontario Canada. The exhibition will be running at the ROM from June 27, 2009 to January 03, 2010. Photo by Deborah Baic The Globe and Mail (Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

MUSEUMS

Who can save the ROM this time? Add to ...

A critical question facing the ROM's trustees is where to find the best candidate: from inside the museums world, or outside, in business or another field. On that issue, the gulf between museologists and museum boards, which are often composed of business leaders and deep-pocketed donors (and typically make the most important decisions, including the hiring of directors), has only grown deeper in the last decade.

Museum trustees across the continent began turning to proven managers from the worlds of business, media and politics in the 1990s, in large part because the governments that once provided the bulk of museums' funding made it clear that they expected the institutions, including the ROM, would become more self-reliant.

To many professionals from within the field, the fashion of picking outsiders has in many cases been a disaster. "Would you have somebody run the Toronto Dominion Bank who has never had any experience in banking?" said Sues. "No, of course you wouldn't." He cited the example of Lawrence M. Small, the former financier who was chosen in 2000 to lead the Smithsonian Institution, and who managed to infuriate many of the institution's staff, donors, sponsors and directors over his troubled, seven-year term. (Sues said that Thorsell's hiring, by contrast, was "a stroke of genius.")

And yet there are almost as many examples of museums experts failing as directors. In New Zealand, a respected Canadian exhibitions expert named Vanda Vitali, who was named director of the Auckland Museum three years ago, was communicating with the institution's board through a lawyer before Christmas. She's been accused of antagonizing the museum's staff with layoffs and by making many of them apply to keep their jobs, and of having "appalling people skills, [an]encyclopedic ignorance of New Zealand society and history, and [an]inability to think clearly." And even the ROM has struggled with leaders who came with plenty of museum qualifications. Lindsay Sharp, the British-Australian curator who preceded Thorsell, led the museum for three tumultuous years before resigning his post. (Sharp, not coincidentally, aspired to modernize the museum's curatorial style, but without much success; Thorsell is often seen in part as the museum board's reaction to Sharp's populist excesses.) The ROM's trustees, meanwhile, are keeping open minds, they say. Sal Badali, a partner in the executive-search firm Odgers Berndtson and chair of the ROM board, said the trustees wouldn't likely limit which sorts of candidates the board will consider.

Dr. Colin Saldanha, a ROM trustee, said he doesn't care which field the winning candidate comes from. He wants his board colleagues to "think outside the box," he said. "Nobody should be excluded. We want to see people presenting a vision, whoever you are. If your vision fits in with the vision of the board's strategic plan, then that's the kind of person that we need to hire."

Saldanha, who runs a family practice clinic in Mississauga, said that many of the patients he sees - new immigrants who live outside the city core - haven't even heard of the ROM, much less visited it. He wants a new director who will make the museum, which charges $22 for adult admission, more affordable, and will reach out to ethnic and religious groups around the region. His hope: "A redefining of the term and concept of the museum," he said. "It should be a centre for innovation, information, technology, all combined together within the grasp of the common man, the average Ontarian," he said.

The talent pool for the ROM job is surprisingly deep, many people in the field say. Lord said she could think of five Canadians in high-end curatorial posts at major international art museums off the top of her head (she declined to name them, however, saying it wouldn't be fair to them).

Janice Price, of Luminato, said Canadian cultural leaders working abroad are sometimes called "the Maple Leaf Mafia," because they hold so many powerful positions around the globe.

Sues, the paleontologist, said he's heard his colleagues talking about the ROM post since the announcement of Thorsell's departure. "It's a very prestigious appointment," he said. Asked to name the qualifications a strong candidate for the ROM job should have, he said they should understand Canada and Toronto, have strong academic credentials and should have proven themselves at major museums in the United States or internationally - a list of attributes that coincidentally mirrors Sues's own résumé.

Would he be interested in the job? "Well nobody has approached me yet," he said. He added, "I certainly would not be averse to being in a conversation about it."

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