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Toronto Mayor Rob Ford holds a baby as he attends the CHIN International Picnic, on his first day back in public since returning from a rehabilitation clinic for substance abuse problems in Toronto, July 1, 2014. Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who shot to prominence last year after admitting to smoking crack, buying illegal drugs and driving after drinking, insisted for months he did not have a problem. But last month he said he would take time off to deal with his drinking issues in rehabilitation and has now returned to office. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY) (MARK BLINCH/REUTERS)
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford holds a baby as he attends the CHIN International Picnic, on his first day back in public since returning from a rehabilitation clinic for substance abuse problems in Toronto, July 1, 2014. Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who shot to prominence last year after admitting to smoking crack, buying illegal drugs and driving after drinking, insisted for months he did not have a problem. But last month he said he would take time off to deal with his drinking issues in rehabilitation and has now returned to office. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY) (MARK BLINCH/REUTERS)

Globe editorial

Voters are entitled to more, fuller answers from Rob Ford Add to ...

On Monday, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford held a post-rehab “press conference” to which most of the media was not invited, and at which he took no questions. On Tuesday, a man social media branded as #shirtlessjogger accosted the mayor at a Canada Day event, and shouted a few pointed questions at him. He got no answers. On Wednesday, the mayor decided to grant short interviews to two TV journalists. They got to ask a few questions. As for answers, they had no more luck than #shirtlessjogger.

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Mr. Ford learned a few things in rehab. He has a disease, he told his interviewers, a disease he wishes had been explained to him years ago. He kept coming back to that: I have a disease. A disease “I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy.” “When you have this disease, you say things and do things that aren’t you.” “It’s a chronical medical condition that I never understood,” and “the beginning of a long journey.”

But the questions that need answering are not when, where and on what substance(s) Mr. Ford became hammered, intoxicated, inebriated and plastered. We know most of that; the only one who long pretended he didn’t was Mr. Ford himself. The unanswered questions involve his relationships with criminals and accused criminals. He says he no longer associates with those people, but won’t explain who he’s talking about, or why he’s allegedly severed contact. Were his friends doing something wrong? Was he? Why won’t he talk to the police about it? The mayor, who was otherwise an ideal guest for Dr. Phil, immediately turned mum.“You should be talking to my lawyer,” he said, and repeatedly leaned on that reply.

In other words, Mr. Ford takes full responsibility for his words and actions, which are also fully explained by having a disease. As for questions about his many questionable relationships, he won’t answer them. Maybe it worked in a therapy circle. Voters are entitled to a bit more.

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