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A thick layer of ice encases power lines in Toronto, where hundreds of thousands of homes were left without power for days after an ice storm brought down tree limbs and hydro wires. (KEVIN VAN PAASSEN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
A thick layer of ice encases power lines in Toronto, where hundreds of thousands of homes were left without power for days after an ice storm brought down tree limbs and hydro wires. (KEVIN VAN PAASSEN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

WHAT READERS THINK

Dec. 28: Ice and power woes, and other letters to the editor Add to ...

State of ice emergency

When you have to spend more than four nights and days without power in a home that is dark and 4 C inside, one wonders why a state of emergency was not declared at the beginning of this atrocious situation.

Certainly the people working night and day to re-establish power are to be congratulated and thanked. They have done what they could and even more.

But in a country such as Canada, you wonder why it is taking so, so long to put an end to such human suffering for so many.

Jean Raoul Fournier, Toronto

.........

Density crushes lifestyle

Re Density’s Crush (letters, Dec. 27): Rather than quality of life, hyperdensity has everything to do with cramming more people into an area without increasing the physical footprint of the structures they live in (building up instead of out).

Putting more dwellings in the same space means developers are happy (greater profits) and politicians are happy (higher tax revenues), but let the residents fend for themselves when it comes to vehicle and pedestrian congestion, infrastructure overload and breakdown, and societal ills.

Peter Lewis-Watts, Barrie, Ont.

.........

Say cheese? Say fairness

Re Free The Cheese! (editorial, Dec. 26): Before we start telling our government to reduce the Canadian trade barriers protecting our farmers, let’s make sure that our trading partners do the same.

European and American farmers get much more protection through subsidies and other restrictions than ours do.

What foreign trade protections in agricultural products by Europe and the United States are being reduced during our trade negotiations?

William Baldwin, Toronto

.........

Delivery drone, incoming

Re Gifts From On High (editorial, Dec. 26): With all due respect to your editorial writers, the first thoughts that came to my mind after reading about Amazon’s delivery drones weren’t about the actual technology, but the whereabouts of the BB gun my dad gave me back in the politically incorrect 1950s when I was a preteen.

It was a Daisy Red Ryder Cowboy Carbine 1000-shot style with a leather butt boot; I used it to “terminate with extreme prejudice” all dastardly enemies I deemed appropriate for removal.

David Honigsberg, Toronto

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TALKING POINT returns Jan. 4

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