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Lane Keeping Technology: Ford will introduce in early 2012 an innovative Lane Keeping System with three unique features designed to help drivers stay in control behind the wheel, including a Driver Alert System that can notify drivers if it detects signs of drowsiness. (11/07/2011)
Lane Keeping Technology: Ford will introduce in early 2012 an innovative Lane Keeping System with three unique features designed to help drivers stay in control behind the wheel, including a Driver Alert System that can notify drivers if it detects signs of drowsiness. (11/07/2011)

Drive, She Said

Safety systems designed to save you from your bad habits Add to ...

Mercedes-Benz’s Lane Keeping Assist; BMW’s Lateral Collision Avoidance System; Ford’s Lane Keeping System. Nearly every manufacturer has a version of this, a warning device to let you know if your car has strayed from your lane.

Some have a lighted warning, others have an audible bell, still others have a steering wheel that vibrates like a built-in rumble strip. If your turn signal is not activated and your car starts to wander, you will be warned to snap out of it.

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Last summer, Quebec launched a campaign to combat drowsy driving and study after study – including one recently released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta – has pegged those most at risk.

Need a scary number? Up to 20 per cent of Canadians have reported falling asleep at the wheel, according to the Canada Safety Council.

There are no new revelations about the worst offenders: Those who drive long distances, those who sleep the least or snore or suffer from sleep apnea, shift workers, commercial drivers, and those taking sedatives.

Every study has a figurative asterisk beside its measured injury and fatality rates: you can’t ask a dead person if they nodded off just before they died.

Results are often pegged in the absence of mechanical failure and circumstances noted in the minutes leading up the crash, if possible.

You’ve all driven behind a sleepy driver, you might even have thought they were drunk.

According to the studies cited by the CDC, 18 hours without sleep will produce a level of impairment in most people equivalent to a blood alcohol content of 0.05 per cent. Get to 24 hours, and it’s closer to 0.10.

The solution that is the most obvious and the easiest is, of course, the one people circumvent.

If you’re too tired to drive, rolling down the window, cranking up the stereo and downing yet more coffee won’t make you less tired. Sleep will make you less tired.

Even a 20-minute nap will help; though even then, don’t be prepared to push through more than a few additional hours after a nap and some caffeine.

If you’re a passenger in a car being driven by someone you suspect should be asleep – and soon might be – offer to drive. Stopping every couple of hours is a good rule of thumb for any long drive, and putting safety first must be a shared priority.

If you know your kid is tired or shouldn’t be driving, don’t insist on them hitting a curfew that might lead to a crash.

There is no doubt that car manufacturers bringing lane departure warning technology to more cars is good.

While a cynic might also consider it Text Assist, anything a car can do to warn the driver of possible errors will save lives. That same cynic might note that, while cars are getting better and safer, drivers aren’t exactly following suit.

Like electronic stability control (mandatory on new cars in Canada manufactured since September, 2011), you can bet lane departure will be standard in the near future on most cars. Most brands have it in their premium lines, but like many life-saving safety features, it is rapidly moving down the chain.

I’d like to think that technologies like these will teach, if not train, people.

If you’re constantly lighting up your lane assist warning like the giant clown nose on a game of Operation, maybe that’s your cue to get some sleep, keep your eyes on the road, or take a refresher driving course.

If you’re activating your electronic stability control, it’s not a high five that you’ve discovered the boundary of your car’s performance; it’s a warning that you’ve been careless enough to find it.

These systems are correcting driver error – engaging them means you’ve made a mistake.

Some lane departure warnings are only active at more than 80 km/h. Others are overridden by a turn signal, which means if someone has left their signal on (another sign of inattentiveness), the system won’t work. Expect more fine-tuning, but also expect more aids to save drivers from themselves.

The more bells and whistles a car has, well, the more bells and whistles will be going off. Doesn’t matter if it’s chimes, vibrations, pretty lights or flashing warnings; your car is talking to you like never before.

For those insisting they don’t need a nanny, it would be tempting to let Darwin have at it – unless that theory is playing out in the car next to you.

The safer we make ourselves, the safer we make each other.

lorraineonline.ca

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