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2005 Honda Civic (Honda/Honda)
2005 Honda Civic (Honda/Honda)

Rob's Garage

What to do about a Honda sensor that won't turn off? Add to ...

Hi Rob

My seatbelt/airbag sensor is permanently in the on position on the dashboard of my 2005 Honda Civic SE. I have taken it to the dealer where they charged me to fix it.

Less than 10 km away, the light has turned back on and stayed on ever since. I live in a small town a considerable distance from my dealer. I did phone to advise them when I got home and plan to return to the dealership on my next trip out of town.

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Just wondering what you think it might be? And since it is a seatbelt/airbag sensor – is this not an item they should fix for free?

Brenda

To start with Brenda, I’m going to make an assumption: I’m hoping you haven’t been told that the issue is actually the seatbelt sensor, because these sensors are usually not the problem.

If the shop has exhausted their search under the seats (sensors), here’s what you should consider next.

There is a distinct possibility that the problem lies within the instrument cluster, also known as the gauge assembly. Part of the interface or circuitry of the SRS system (Supplemental Restraint System) is housed within this cluster. The bad news is that if your car is outside the warranty period, you’ll have to purchase a new cluster if your car has been diagnosed with this problem.

Take your Civic back to the dealer and have them find the diagnostic process for “SRS indicator stays on, but no DTCs are stored.”

The good news with this is if this proves to be the problem, your light will remain out. The bad news is that you will be showing the cashier the inside of your wallet for the repair – I hate it when that happens!

One thing to consider is the possibility of installing a used instrument cluster. The dealer can pick up a cluster from an auto recycler (Auto wrecker to anyone over the age of 40).

If the dealer confirms that the instrument cluster isn’t at fault, the system will require extensive diagnosis. Good luck.

Send your auto maintenance and repair questions to globedrive@globeandmail.com

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