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Each is designed with a lightweight aluminum honeycomb base that flips open to reveal a tent. (HENRY ALCOCK WHITE/TREELINE OUTDOORS)
Each is designed with a lightweight aluminum honeycomb base that flips open to reveal a tent. (HENRY ALCOCK WHITE/TREELINE OUTDOORS)

Gadget

Stay safe and dry with a tent you can put on top of your car Add to ...

Treeline Outdoors Roof-Top Tents

Ah, there it is. The perfect place to camp. Pull over. Park. Unzip the load on the rooftop, flip the lid/base, prop the ladder and bang! Instant accommodations. Treeline Outdoors of Turner Valley, Alta., offers rooftop tents to keep campers high and dry and away from animals that may go bump in the night.

And a nighttime bump is exactly what sparked the design of the rooftop tent. As company founder Chad Kendrick lay quiet and awake while a grizzly bear strolled through his camp, a simple, comfortable and safe solution popped into his head: Put the tent on the roof.

There are five models, each able to sleep at least two, and one up to five campers. Each is designed with a lightweight aluminum honeycomb base that flips open to reveal a tent. Pop the waterproof rip-stop canvas walls open with the rugged poles, roll up the window awnings and it’s ready for a superslumber. The high-density foam mattress and sleeping bags are already in there.

Other nifty features: skylights, dangling shoe-storage bags, utility nets on the base, and a unisex urinal for those rainy or scary nights. Add-ons include a ground-level annex with floor, solar kits and camping gear. When folded, a standard two- to three-person unit weighs roughly 100 pounds.

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