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Columnist Peter Cheney's mother, Tharon Cheney, in his Fiat 600 (which she later backed into a ditch) (Peter Cheney/Peter Cheney)
Columnist Peter Cheney's mother, Tharon Cheney, in his Fiat 600 (which she later backed into a ditch) (Peter Cheney/Peter Cheney)

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Your favourite stories about your mothers and driving Add to ...

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Our mother learned to drive when she had four children under the age of seven, and a fifth on the way. Newly arrived in Canada, our family had recently acquired an enormous 1953 Pontiac Strato Chief, already a bit of an antique. As we lived on the grounds of the rural psychiatric hospital where our father worked, miles from anything like shops or schools, our father decided that it was best that our mother learn to drive. So he persuaded a Maltese neighbour, Mr. Formosa, who was an orderly at the hospital, to teach our mother how to drive. As seatbelts and babysitters had not yet been invented, this meant that the four of us occupied the back seat in an unstructured way, while Mum and our unborn brother sat in the driver's seat with Mr. Formosa beside them, explaining about clutches and gears and so on, in his broken English. Mum, who found it hard to understand Canadian accents at the best of times, was as mystified by Mr. Formosa's explanations as he was by her Highland Scottish accent. We've never been sure who gave up first, Mum or Mr. Formosa, but she never acquired a driver's licence. Her children later found her invaluable as a passenger, once they learned to drive, because she had an uncanny ability to locate a parking space: a valuable skill once we moved to downtown Toronto. Long after her death, we still call on Mum whenever we need a place to park. - Eya Donald Greenland, Toronto

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My Mom and I were driving home and it very very foggy. We were worried about not being able to see and to be seen. We were driving very very slow. It was so foggy for about 30 kms. As we were driving and chatting and all of a sudden my Mom put the brakes on suddenly. We saw this black something in the middle of our lane. I was like, what is that? My Mom started laughing, it was a beaver crossing the highway. It was hilarious. We had wait for the beaver to get to the other side. As we drove by, it flap its tail in the creek on the other side. My Mom just "don't know why he's upset. - Karen Mustus, Edmonton, AB.

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When I was 14, my mom was driving home, she gets into the driveway and I guess didnt put the gear into park properly. she gets out of the car (in a hurry, dont remember why)...the car obviously starts moving back and she ends up running over her own foot. I was in the passenger seat. Had to jump into the drivers seat and stop the car from hitting the kids that were playing in the area. terrible!

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My Mom was a beautiful woman, with a warm heart and love for life like no other. But she drove like it was Armageddon and she was humanity’s last salvation. Red lights were a signal to speed up and then slam on the brakes as hard as possible at the last minute. I think I still have the seatbelt marks embedded across my shoulder. She once sped away, squealing the tires no less, after getting a speeding ticket. It’s a testament only to that police officers generous heart that she did not get another ticket. Or maybe, like any of the rest of us who dared get in a car with Mom, he was just in a state of profound shock, unable to react. Although my Mom is gone now, sadly, I can’t help but smile in remembrance every time I pull up to a red light (slowly). - Alicja Parlak, Mississauga, ON @AlicjaAP

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Having Mom tell me "blind spots" don't exist since she can't see them. Lane change = near death experience. – LLSturla, via Twitter

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lol don't talk to your dad, he is driving and needs to concentrate - as she held onto the armrest with both hands. - Lynne/CarlynServices, via Twitter

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My Mum drove a yellow and black Dodge Dart. We called it the taxi. It was the seventies and the music was the best and my Mum would crank the stero and jam to the tunes with only using her thumbs on the steering wheel. I am now in my 50's now and when I drive I do the exact same thing! The apple and tree - you know?

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