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Chris Buescher (60) leads Alex Tagliani through a corner during the NASCAR Nationwide Series Nationwide Children's Hospital 200 auto race at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014, in Lexington, Ohio. (Tom E. Puskar/AP Photo)
Chris Buescher (60) leads Alex Tagliani through a corner during the NASCAR Nationwide Series Nationwide Children's Hospital 200 auto race at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014, in Lexington, Ohio. (Tom E. Puskar/AP Photo)

Motorsports

Racing roundup: NASCAR’s new 'no hot track' rule too late for Kevin Ward Jr. Add to ...

Quote of the Week: “There’s times that you’re out there and you get closer than you want to somebody if they come back out on the race track, or maybe you’re not even paying attention, you’re focused on getting your car going and someone else shows displeasure not even at you and you don’t see them until the last second. At the end of the day, we’re a resource that a lot of other series and a lot other race tracks look up to, and so hopefully this will help maybe start a trend that not just affects here but affects all the way down to our local Friday and Saturday night races. I think ultimately that would be a huge step in our sport.”

– Justin Allgaier on NASCAR’s new rule to keep drivers in their cars after on track incidents. The rule was instituted in response to the death of Kevin Ward Jr. in a sprint car race in upstate New York on Aug. 9. Ward walked onto the track during a yellow to confront NASCAR driver Tony Stewart and died when he was hit by the three-time NASCAR Sprint cup champion’s car.

The Last Word: As Formula One gets ready to go back to racing after a month off, there have been several “rate the drivers comparisons” out there to fill the news void. Let’s be clear, no matter how much the pair of Mercedes drivers continue to dominate the season, one racer stood head and shoulders above the rest in the first 11 grands prix: Fernando Alonso.

Despite driving another sub-par Ferrari, Alonso continues to amaze most observers by scoring points and podiums in a car that is somewhere around third– to fourth-best on the grid, depending on the particular track. That means there are at least six or eight drivers with a better car in most races, and yet the Ferrari driver still has two podiums and seven top-5s in 2014.

In 11 grands prix this year, he has outqualified his world champion teammate Kimi Räikkönen 9-2 and finished ahead of him in every start. Along the way, Alonso has finished in the top-10 in every race so far – the only F1 driver to do so this season – and has four times the points haul of his teammate. Incredibly, the Spaniard is fourth overall in points with 115 markers, while Räikkönen is a more earthly 12th with 27.

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