Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Maserati will be featured in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue, where the magazine devotes seven pages to the car maker’s new lineup and Heidi Klum. (Maserati/Sports Illustrated)
Maserati will be featured in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue, where the magazine devotes seven pages to the car maker’s new lineup and Heidi Klum. (Maserati/Sports Illustrated)

Shifting Gears

The supermodel - and the super models Add to ...

Maserati knows a good thing when it sees it – which is why the exotic auto maker has worked its way into the 50th Anniversary Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue.

Called “Beyond the Swimsuit,” the magazine devotes seven pages to supermodel Heidi Klum with Maserati’s new car lineup: the Ghibli, Quattroporte and GranTurismo.

More Related to this Story

And if the title of the feature hasn’t made it painfully clear, Klum isn’t wearing a swimsuit in any of the pictures.

WE’RE NEXT: Step aside, Japan, here comes Mexico. Honda opened an $800-million (U.S.) plant in Guanajuato, Mexico, on Feb. 21 to produce 200,000 Fit hatchbacks per year, the Associated Press reports – making Mexico the second-largest exporter of vehicles to the United States. Canada holds the top spot, but with Mazda set to open a plant just 40 kilometres from the Honda facility, Mexico is expected to surpass Canada by the end of 2015.

WHO’S NO. 1?: The Toyota Camry has been the best-selling car in the United States for more than a decade, beating the second-place Honda Accord by about 40,000 sales last year. However, Honda announced last week that the Accord was “the No. 1 produced car in America in 2013.” Confused? Here’s the explanation: More than 98 per cent of all Accord sales are to individuals; for the Camry, that number is 84 per cent. The rest of the purchases are fleet sales, mainly to car rental companies. So, while the Camry has more total sales, Honda sold about 24,000 more Accords to regular Americans.

STRIKE TWO: Two weeks ago when pulled over by police, a 10-year-old Norwegian boy behind the wheel of his parents’ car claimed he was a dwarf who left his driver’s licence at home. Turns out he hasn’t learned his lesson as Reuters reports the little trouble-maker went on a 30-km joyride last week in the car of another relative before being stopped. Somebody hide the keys, please …

GLASS HOUSES: Google lobbyists are fighting proposed restrictions on Google Glass in three American states – Illinois, Delaware and Missouri. Reuters reports that eight states in all are looking at regulation of the device, a small computer screen mounted on an eyeglass frame. There are concerns that drivers will pay too much attention to their e-mail rather than the road. Google Glass is not yet widely available and that is the thrust of Google’s argument: Legislation is premature. However, Illinois state Senator Ira Silverstein, who introduced a Google Glass restriction bill in December, told Reuters that it was clear the merchandise was heading for the broader public. “Who are they fooling?”

If you have questions about driving or car maintenance, please contact our experts at globedrive@globeandmail.com.

Follow us on Twitter @Globe_Drive.

Add us to your circles.

Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Follow on Twitter: @WoodyMcGee

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories