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A local drives through high water in downtown High River, Alberta on Thursday, June 20, 2013. The town was under mandatory evacuation this morning they declared a state of emergency at 9:20 a.m. and anyone who lived near a river, creek or stream was asked to leave. Recently heavy rains caused the river to break the banks which runs right through town. (Chris Bolin For The Globe and Mail)
A local drives through high water in downtown High River, Alberta on Thursday, June 20, 2013. The town was under mandatory evacuation this morning they declared a state of emergency at 9:20 a.m. and anyone who lived near a river, creek or stream was asked to leave. Recently heavy rains caused the river to break the banks which runs right through town. (Chris Bolin For The Globe and Mail)

Wet lemons: Beware of flood-damaged cars Add to ...

Be on the lookout for wet lemons.

That’s the warning from insurance companies, which say some car-owners in flood-ravaged parts of southern Alberta may be looking to unload their water-damaged vehicles.

The Alberta government says any vehicle that has been submerged in water to a level at or above the dashboard or centre console is considered flood-damaged.

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Rocco Neglia from Economical Insurance says it won’t always be immediately noticeable, but within a year the electrical system might need replacing or repairing.

Neglia says the mechanical system might also be subject to extensive corrosion.

Things to watch out for include water stains, heavy perfumes to mask smells, rust, or condensation on the windows.

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