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A technician works on a simulator at CAE Inc., in Montreal (Christinne Muschi For The Globe and Mail)
A technician works on a simulator at CAE Inc., in Montreal (Christinne Muschi For The Globe and Mail)

CAE signs military agreements Add to ...

CAE Inc. says it has signed about $100-million worth of various military contracts with groups that include the U.S. navy and Canada's Department of National Defence.

The Montreal-based company, which provides training equipment and services to both the civil aviation and defence communities, announced Wednesday that its latest military contracts were awarded in more than 10 countries.

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Among the contracts are several agreements with the U.S. navy. One of those is to build flight training devices for Taiwan's navy and another provides a major upgrade to the U.S. navy's operational flight trainer.

"The United States Navy continues to be one of CAE's largest customers, and we are pleased to have won contracts over the past couple months," said Martin Gagne, president of CAE's military products, training and services.

"Simulation offers a number of advantages, including compelling cost benefits, which simply cannot be ignored in the economic environment facing most militaries globally."

Other contracts include a maintenance and support agreement for flight training devices owned by Lockheed Martin, and also agreements with Canada's Department of National Defence and Defence Research and Development Canada.

CAE is the world's largest maker of full-scale flight simulators with $1.5-billion of annual revenues from simulator sales and training for civil and military aviation organizations around the world.

It employs more than 7,500 people at more than 100 sites, including its main operational base in Montreal, and has training locations in more than 20 countries.

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