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(John Tomaselli/photos.com)
(John Tomaselli/photos.com)

Your money

Five common tax mistakes to avoid Add to ...

1. Moving expenses

You can only claim moving expenses that your employer hasn't already reimbursed you for. If you have been reimbursed for some or all of your moving expenses, you must include this as income on your tax return.

2. Public transit costs

You can't claim day passes, tokens or tickets. You can only claim a monthly or annual transit pass.

More Related to this Story

Find out how whether you’re eligible and how to claim public transit costs by watching this video from the Canada Revenue Agency.

3. Interest paid on student loans

You can only claim interest on student loans made to you under the Canada Student Loans Act, the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act, or similar provincial or territorial government laws. You can't claim interest paid on any other kind of loan, even if it is to finance your education. Example: a line of credit. You can’t transfer the claim to anyone else, even if they paid the interest on the loan.

4. Union and professional dues

Your employer may withhold dues from your pay. This will be noted on your T4 slip and you can claim a corresponding deduction. You may also get a receipt for these dues from your union or association. But you can only claim the deduction once. If you have been reimbursed for dues paid, you cannot claim any of the dues as a deduction unless your employer has included them as a taxable benefit on your T4.

5. Other deductions (line 232)

You can only use line 232 to claim allowable amounts not deducted anywhere else on your return. You can't use this line to claim personal or living expenses that are not legitimate tax deductions. Examples: funeral costs, wedding costs, legal fees paid for separation or divorce agreements.


 

Content in this section is provided in partnership with Investor Education Fund, a non-profit organization founded and supported by the Ontario Securities Commission that provides unbiased and independent financial tools to help Canadians make better money decisions. To find out more, go to: GetSmarterAboutMoney.ca

 

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