The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Press release from PR Newswire

Planned Maintenance Outage Will Take Indiana Michigan Power's Cook Plant Unit 1 Off-Line Beginning March 12

Friday, March 11, 2011

Planned Maintenance Outage Will Take Indiana Michigan Power's Cook Plant Unit 1 Off-Line Beginning March 1208:00 EST Friday, March 11, 2011BRIDGMAN, Mich., March 11, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Indiana Michigan Power's Cook Nuclear Plant Unit 1 will power down late today in preparation for a planned maintenance outage that will take the unit off-line beginning early March 12. The primary purpose of the outage is to repair the main generator hydrogen seal system. Although a mid-cycle shutdown to make the repair was not required, taking the unit off-line supports AEP's conservative approach to maintaining safety and reliability at Cook Plant. The unit will be at zero percent power while the hydrogen seal system work is in progress, however the reactor will remain at full temperature and pressure, ready to return to full power as soon as the repairs are complete."We have taken the time up front to develop an outage plan that puts safety first, and maximizes opportunities for repairs and maintenance while minimizing the amount of time the unit will be off-line," said Joel Gebbie, Cook Nuclear Plant Site Vice President.At full capacity, the 1,030-net MW Unit 1 and 1,077-net MW Unit 2 combined produce enough electricity for more than one and one half million average homes.Indiana Michigan Power is a unit of American Electric Power (NYSE: AEP). American Electric Power is one of the largest electric utilities in the United States, delivering electricity to more than 5 million customers in 11 states. AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 MW of generating capacity in the U.S. AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined. AEP's transmission system directly or indirectly serves about 10 percent of the electricity demand in the Eastern Interconnection, the interconnected transmission system that covers 38 eastern and central U.S. states and eastern Canada, and approximately 11 percent of the electricity demand in ERCOT, the transmission system that covers much of Texas. AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia and West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service Company of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas). AEP's headquarters are in Columbus, Ohio. SOURCE American Electric PowerFor further information: Bill Downey, Communications Representative, Office: +1-269-466-2955, Cell: +1-269-405-0184, wrdowney@aep.com