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Press release from CNW Group

Absolute Software Provides Tips to Help Dads and Grads Protect New Tech Gifts

Thursday, June 09, 2011

Absolute Software Provides Tips to Help Dads and Grads Protect New Tech Gifts13:57 EDT Thursday, June 09, 2011Consumers Predicted to Spend More Than $1B on Electronics for Father's Day, LoJack® for Laptops by Absolute Software Offers A Critical Layer of Protection From Laptop and Identity TheftVANCOUVER, June 9, 2011 /CNW/ - Laptops and desktop computers continue to grow in popularity as both graduation and Father's Day gifts. In response to this trend, Absolute® Software Corporation ("Absolute" or the "Company") (TSX: ABT), the leading provider of endpoint security and management solutions that reduce IT costs, prove regulatory compliance, respond to computer theft, and optimize productivity, today releases tips to empower recent graduates and deserving dads to protect their new computers.Last year, surveys by BIGresearch® and the National Retail Federation (NRF) revealed that 10.6 percent of consumers purchasing gifts for graduates planned to give electronics, a 9 percent increase from 20091. Additionally, 18.5 percent of those surveyed this year intended to buy consumer electronics or computer-related accessories for Father's Day2. To help consumers protect their new costly devices and sensitive personal information, Absolute offers the following tips:Don't Rely on Free Software Trials - It's easy to forget or ignore alerts when software trials expire, leaving the computer at risk for malicious threats or worse if the device is ever lost or stolen. From day one of use, owners should activate full subscriptions of theft recovery, anti-virus and anti-spyware software. For example, consumers who activate their subscription to LoJack for Laptops are instantly able to take advantage of a full suite of security features to manage and protect their computer.Choose Dynamic Passwords - To achieve strong levels of protection, passwords should be changed often, differ greatly and be difficult to guess. According to research from the Georgia Tech Research Institute, ideal passwords also consist of a mix of randomized upper- and lower- case letters, at least one number and one symbol, and should be longer than 12 characters3.Fill Out The Warranty Information - If the computer is damaged while it is out of the owner's hands, the manufacturer may cover repairs as part of the warranty if the device is recovered. Agreements differ from company to company; however, taking a few minutes to submit warranty information online or via mail can save consumers from additional distress and out-of-pocket expenses.Designate Folders for Sensitive Files - Every second counts after a laptop is stolen. Using the Delete functionality in LoJack for Laptops, users can remotely erase all or specific files so that they are not exposed to prying eyes. To get to important files quickly, computer owners should designate files, under non-descriptive names, to contain this type of information.Remain Alert When Traveling - Many laptop-friendly locations that consumers encounter during travel are also areas at highest risk for laptop theft. Based on customer reports filed to the Absolute Theft Recovery Team, some of the at-risk locations are public transit, hotels, restaurants/cafes and airports. Staying alert and maintaining possession of the computer at all times during travel will help to prevent theft."For a recent graduate, a laptop isn't just a computer; it's a shot at straight A's. For fathers, a laptop might contain a business plan or a library of family photos. Unfortunately, not all computer owners take steps to protect their devices. In fact, according to the Ponemon Institute, 12,000 laptops are lost in U.S. airports each week and two-thirds are never returned4," said Mark Grace, vice president of consumer business, Absolute Software. "For less than 40 dollars, consumers can invest in a year's worth of protection with LoJack for Laptops and get much more in return—the ability to lock, delete, locate and recover a lost or stolen laptop and protect personal data."With LoJack for Laptops' technology in place, personal information can remain protected even when it's in the wrong hands, helping users to prevent costly hardware replacements and identity theft.For dads, recent graduates, or anyone else wanting to take a proactive approach to protecting their computer, Absolute is now offering a buy-one, get-one free promotion* for standard or premium editions of LoJack for Laptops. Visit www.lojackforlaptops.com for more information or to purchase a subscription.*Limited time offer. Promotion expires on June 19, 2011.How Computrace Technology WorksComputrace® and LoJack for Laptops are powered by the Absolute Software patented Computrace persistence technology. When embedded in the firmware of computers from leading computer manufacturers*, Computrace can survive operating system re-installations, as well as hard-drive reformats, replacements and re-imaging, helping to ensure that the service is there when you need it most. Whether a PC or Mac, the software is virtually undetectable and phones home to the Absolute Monitoring Center with location and asset information. If a computer is reported stolen, the Absolute Theft Recovery Team works on behalf of the customer to gather evidence from the computer to identify the thief's location, and then works with local police to get the computer back. Customers can also remotely delete data to help keep it out of the hands of unauthorized users - a reliable contingency in case data protection solutions fail. Computrace or LoJack for Laptops can be easily activated by customers when they install a license ranging from 1-3 years.*For a list of computers with firmware-embedded support, visitwww.absolute.com/firmware.About Absolute SoftwareAbsolute Software Corporation (TSX: ABT) is the leader in tracking, managing, and protecting computers and mobile devices. The Company's Computrace, Absolute Manage and LoJack for Laptops solutions provide theft recovery, data protection and computer lifecycle management capabilities to organizations and consumers. The Company's software agent is embedded in the firmware of computers by global leaders, including Acer, ASUS, Dell, Fujitsu, General Dynamics Itronix, HP, Lenovo, Motion, Panasonic and Toshiba, and the Company has reselling partnerships with these OEMs and others, including Apple. For more information about Absolute Software, visit www.absolute.com and http://blog.absolute.com.Forward-Looking StatementsThis press release contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, the expected performance, functionality and availability of our services and products, and other expectations, intentions and plans contained in this press release that are not historical fact. When used in this press release, the words "plan," "expect," "believe," and similar expressions generally identify forward-looking statements. These statements reflect our current expectations. They are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, changes in technology and general market conditions. In light of the many risks and uncertainties you should understand that we cannot assure you that the forward-looking statements contained in this press release will be realized.©2011 Absolute Software Corporation. All rights reserved. Computrace and Absolute are registered trademarks of Absolute Software Corporation. LoJack is a registered trademark of LoJack Corporation, used under license by Absolute Software Corporation. LoJack Corporation is not responsible for any content herein. U.S. patents No. 5,715,174, No. 5,764,892, No. 5,802,280, No. 5,896,497, No. 6,087,937, No. 6,244,758, No. 6,269,392, No. 6,300,863, No. 6,507,914, No. 7818557, No. 7818803. Canadian patents No. 2.211.735, No. 2,284,806 and No. 2,205,370. U.K. patents No. EP793823, No. GB2298302 and No. GB2338101. German patent No. 695 125 34.6-08. Australian patent No. 699045. Japanese patent No. JP4067035.The Toronto Stock Exchange has neither approved nor disapproved of the information contained in this news release._____________________________________1 NRF and BIGresearch®, "2010 Graduation Consumer Intentions & Actions Survey," May 20102 NRF and BIGresearch®, "2011 Father's Day Consumer Intentions & Actions Survey," May 20113 Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), "Teraflop Troubles: The Power of Graphics Processing Units May Threaten the World's Password Security System," Case Study, August 20104 Ponemon Institute, Airport Insecurity: The Case of Lost Laptops, June 2008For further information: Public Relations: Kate Ryan, Affect kryan@affect.com or 212.398.9680 Investor Relations: Dave Mason, CFA, The Equicom Group dmason@equicomgroup.com or 416.815.0700 x237