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Press release from Marketwire

Inmet Announces Fourth Quarter Earnings of $0.69 per Share

Thursday, February 09, 2012

Inmet Announces Fourth Quarter Earnings of $0.69 per Share20:20 EST Thursday, February 09, 2012TORONTO, CANADA--(Marketwire - Feb. 9, 2012) -All amounts in Canadian dollars unless indicated otherwiseInmet (TSX:IMN) announces fourth quarter earnings of $0.69 per share.Fourth quarter highlightsStrong earnings from operations Earnings from operations were $92 million compared to $93 million in the fourth quarter of 2010. The impact of significantly higher sales volumes this quarter mainly from Las Cruces, was offset by lower average copper and zinc prices. Although sales volumes were higher this quarter, timing of shipments resulted in copper sales lagging production by a combined 3,000 tonnes at Çayeli and Las Cruces. This timing effect reduced earnings from operations by approximately $12 million (or $0.13 per share on an after-tax basis).Las Cruces production increased In the fourth quarter of 2011, Las Cruces produced 14,100 tonnes of copper cathode, and finished the year with December production above 5,000 tonnes. In the last two weeks of 2011, we sustained recoveries above 88 percent at throughput levels and cathode production approaching design capacity. We believe that the commissioning phase of the operation is now essentially complete and anticipate output in 2012 to stabilize at the plant design capacity of 72,000 tonnes per year. Continued strong performance at Çayeli and Pyhäsalmi Çayeli milled a record 316,000 tonnes this quarter and 1,195,000 tonnes for the year. Pyhäsalmi milled 348,000 tonnes this quarter and reached near-record annual throughput of 1,386,000 for the year. Adjustment of applied interest rate for closure liabilities under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)We recognized a charge of $17 million in earnings from operations, or $0.24 per share, for post-closure liabilities at our closed properties primarily as a result of a decrease in the discount rates we applied in determining the liabilities at period end. This compares to a charge of $13 million recognized in the fourth quarter of 2010.Net income decreased Our net income from continuing operations was $49 million lower than for the same quarter of 2010. We recognized after-tax foreign exchange losses of $9 million this quarter, mainly on cash and long-term bonds we held in US dollars. In the fourth quarter of 2010, we disposed of a non-core investment and recognized a gain of $50.5 million. Cobre Panama received approval of Environmental Social Impact Assessment On December 28, 2011, the government of Panama, through the Autoridad Nacional del Ambiente (ANAM), Panama's environmental regulatory authority, approved the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) required for development of Cobre Panama, including the mining operations and related infrastructure, a port facility, and a coal-fired power plant. Korea Panama Mining Corp. (KPMC) election to exercise Cobre Panama optionIn January 2012, we received notice from KPMC that it elected to exercise its option to acquire a 20 percent interest in Minera Panama S.A. (MPSA), the owner and developer of Cobre Panama, which would leave Inmet with an 80 percent interest. The option exercise is expected to close by the end of February 2012. At closing, KPMC will invest approximately US $155 million into MPSA, representing a 20 percent share of development costs to closing, over the US $30 million of such costs KPMC has already funded.Key financial datathree months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands, except per share amounts)20112010Change20112010changeFINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTSSalesGross sales$241,059$230,269+5%$979,045$778,556+26%Net incomeNet income from continuing operations$48,072$96,863-50%$264,732$265,714-Net income from continuing operations per share$0.69$1.73-60%$3.99$4.74-16%Net income from discontinued operations-$47,993-100%$83,439$124,755-33%Net income from discontinued operations per share-$0.84-100%$1.26$2.21-43%Net income attributable to Inmet shareholders$48,072$146,932-67%$348,171$391,876-11%Net income per share$0.69$2.57-73%$5.25$6.95-24%Cash flowCash flow provided by operating activities$73,097$90,515-19%$404,854$254,918+59%Cash flow provided by operating activities per share (1)$1.05$1.59-34%$6.09$4.52+35%Capital spending (2)$58,976$58,862-$208,541$127,619+63%OPERATING HIGHLIGHTSProduction(3)Copper (tonnes)26,20017,500+50%84,80065,500+29%Zinc (tonnes)17,90021,300-16%80,40081,400-1%Gold (ounces)----37,900-100%Pyrite (tonnes)210,500186,800+13%804,900584,100+38%Copper cash cost (US $ per pound)(4)$0.82$0.74+11%$0.86$0.64+34%as at December 31as at December 31FINANCIAL CONDITION20112010Current ratio9.3 to 13.4 to 1Gross debt to total equity1%1%Net working capital balance (millions)$1,304$626Liquidity balance including cash and long-term bonds (millions)$1,706$699Gross debt (millions)$17$17Shareholders' equity (millions)$3,414$2,555(1)Cash flow provided by operating activities divided by average shares outstanding for the period. (2)Year ended December 31, 2011 includes capital spending of $133 million at Cobre Panama and $54 million at Las Cruces. Year ended December 31, 2010 includes capital spending of $85 million at Cobre Panama and $80 million at Las Cruces, reduced by positive cash flow from pre-operating costs net of revenues and working capital changes at Las Cruces of $56 million.(3)Inmet's share. 2010 production does not include our share of Ok Tedi.(4)Copper cash cost per pound is a non-GAAP financial measure - see Supplementary financial information on pages 30 to 32. Fourth quarter press releaseWhere to find itOur financial results5Key changes in 20115Understanding our performance6 Earnings from operations8 Corporate costs12Results of our operations15 Çayeli16 Las Cruces18 Pyhäsalmi20Status of our development project22 Cobre Panama22Managing our liquidity24Financial condition27Accounting changes28Supplementary financial information30In this press release, Inmet means Inmet Mining Corporation and we, us and our mean Inmet and/or its subsidiaries and joint ventures. This quarter refers to the three months ended December 31, 2011. Adoption of International Financial Reporting StandardsWe have prepared our fourth quarter 2011 consolidated financial statements and other financial information according to International Financial Reporting Standards, and restated our 2010 comparative financial statements and other financial information following our IFRS accounting policies. See Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards on page 28 for more information.Caution with respect to forward-looking statements and informationSecurities regulators encourage companies to disclose forward-looking information to help investors understand a company's future prospects. This interim report contains statements about our business, results of operation and future financial condition.These statements are "forward-looking" because we have used what we know and expect today to make a statement about the future. Forward-looking statements usually include words like may, expect, anticipate, believe or other similar words. Our objectives and outlook have been prepared based on our existing operations, expectations and circumstances. Actual events and results could be substantially different, however, because of the risks and uncertainties associated with our business or events that happen after the date of this interim report.You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. As a general policy, we do not update forward-looking statements except if there is an offering document or where securities legislation requires us to do so. Although we have attempted to identify factors that would cause actual actions, events or results to differ materially from those disclosed in the forward-looking statements or information, there may be other factors that cause actions, events or results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. Also, many of the factors are beyond the control of Inmet. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements or information. Inmet undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking statements or information as a result of new information after the date of this interim report except as required by law. All forward-looking statements and information herein are qualified by this cautionary statement.Our financial results three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands, except per share amounts)20112010change20112010changeEARNINGS FROM OPERATIONS (1)Çayeli$35,807$36,810-3%$159,698$148,504+8%Las Cruces41,71023,508+77%126,39244,889+182%Pyhäsalmi31,18245,440-31%143,149120,257+19%Other(16,722)(13,071)+28%(16,722)16,595-201%91,97792,687-1%412,517330,245+25%DEVELOPMENT AND EXPLORATIONCorporate development and exploration(6,541)(5,434)+20%(29,202)(13,495)+116%CORPORATE COSTSGeneral and administration(7,734)(4,758)+63%(34,401)(20,364)+69%Investment and other income(4,011)50,622-108%30,72558,344-47%Stand by costs----(6,753)-100%Finance costs(2,390)(4,294)-44%(9,484)(13,176)-28%Income taxes(23,229)(31,960)-27%(105,423)(69,087)+53%(37,364)9,610-487%(118,583)(51,036)+132%Net income from continuing operations48,07296,863-51%264,732265,714-Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)-47,993-100%83,439124,755-33%Non-controlling interest-(2,076)-100%-(1,407)-100%Net income attributable to Inmet shareholders$48,072$146,932-67%$348,171$391,876-11%Income from continuing operations per common share$0.69$1.73-60%$3.99$4.74-16%Diluted income from continuing operations per common share$0.69$1.73-60%$3.98$4. 73+16%Basic net income per common share$0.69$2.57-73%$5.25$6.95-24%Diluted net income per common share$0.69$2.57-73%$5.23$6.94-25%Weighted average shares outstanding69,33257,053+22%66,43256,345+18%(1)Gross sales less smelter processing charges and freight, cost of sales including depreciation and provisions for mine reclamation at closed properties. Key changes in 2011 (millions)three months ended December 31Year ended December 31see pageEARNINGS FROM OPERATIONSMarket FactorsHigher (lower) copper prices denominated in Canadian dollars$(27)$368Lower zinc prices denominated in Canadian dollars(7)(7)8Other changes in prices denominated in Canadian dollars(1)168Lower smelter processing charges4710Foreign exchange - decreased operating costs2911Operational FactorsHigher sales volume at Las Cruces, net of production costs37114192010 earnings from Troilus-(30)Higher sales volumes at our other mines6188Higher operating costs at our other mines(3)(19)11Higher depreciation due to Las Cruces production(9)(57)12Other(3)(4)Increase (decrease) in operating earnings, compared to 2010(1)83Lower (higher) taxes from lower (higher) income9(37)14Higher corporate development, exploration and administrative costs(4)(30)12Foreign exchange changes(8)1213Gain on sale of investment in Premier Gold Mines Ltd. in 2010(51)(51)13Higher interest income2913Las Cruces standby charges in 2010-714Other46Lower net income from continuing operations compared to 2010(49)(1)Lower income from discontinued operation - Ok Tedi(48)(41)14Non-controlling interest in 2010(2)-Lower net income attributable to Inmet shareholders compared to 2010$(99)$(42)Understanding our performanceMetal pricesThe table below shows the average metal prices we realized in US dollars and Canadian dollars, this quarter and year to date compared to 2010. The prices we realize include finalization adjustments - see Gross sales on page 9.three months ended December 31Year ended December 3120112010change20112010changeUS dollar metal pricesCopper (per pound)US $3.51US $4.10-14%US $3.84US $3.55+8%Zinc (per pound)US $0.87US $1.06-18%US $0.97US $0.96+1%Canadian dollar metal pricesCopper (per pound)C $3.59C $4.15-13%C $3.80C $3.66+4%Zinc (per pound)C $0.89C $1.07-17%C $0.96C $0.99-3%CopperCopper was one of the strongest performing base metals for most of this year, with London Metals Exchange (LME) prices rising from US $4.42 per pound at the beginning of the year, to a record high price of US $4.60 per pound on February 14. Prices remained strong for much of the year, before they fell sharply by 23 percent in the final quarter of 2011, closing the year at US $3.43 per pound. LME copper prices averaged US $4.00 per pound this year, the highest ever average annual price, compared to US $3.42 per pound in 2010. LME copper prices averaged US $3.40 per pound in the fourth quarter, a decrease of 13 percent from the comparative quarter of 2010.ZincLME zinc prices averaged US $0.86 per pound this quarter, a decrease of 18 percent from the fourth quarter of 2010. LME zinc prices averaged US $0.99 per pound this year, slightly higher than the average 2010 zinc price of US $0.98 per pound. Exchange ratesExchange rates affect our revenue and earnings. The table below shows the average exchange rates we realized this quarter and year to date compared to 2010.three months ended December 31Year ended December 3120112010change20112010changeExchange rates1 US$ to C$$1.02$1.01+1%$0.99$1.03-4%1 euro to C$$1.38$1.38-$1.38$1.37+1%1 euro to US$$1.35$1.37-1%$1.39$1.39-1 US$ to Turkish lira TL 1.83 TL 1.46 +25 %TL 1.65 TL 1.50 +10 %Compared to the same quarter last year, the value of the Canadian dollar went down 1 percent relative to the US dollar, and maintained its value relative to the euro. Our earnings are affected by changes in foreign currency exchange rates when we:translate the results of our operations from their functional currency (US dollars or euros) to Canadian dollars translate Çayeli's Turkish lira denominated costs into its functional currency (US dollars) revalue US dollars and euros that we hold in cash and long-term bonds at Corporate. Lower zinc treatment chargesTreatment charges are one component of smelter processing charges. We also pay smelters for content losses and price participation. The table below shows the average charges we realized this quarter and for the year. Our copper contracts with the smelters for 2011 had higher payment terms than 2010, consistent with the overall industry. Additionally, spot smelter processing charges for a portion of the year were significantly higher as the earthquake in Japan in March 2011 caused temporary stoppages in copper smelter production, lowering short-term demand for copper concentrates. Zinc treatment charges were lower in 2011 compared to 2010, reflecting a tightening zinc concentrate market. three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(US$)20112010(1)change20112010(1)changeTreatment chargesCopper (per dry metric tonne of concentrate)US $55US $45+22%US $57US $51+12%Zinc (per dry metric tonne of concentrate)US $184US $239-23%US $216US $244-11%Price participationCopper (per pound)US $0.02US $0.03-33%US $0.02US $0.02-Zinc (per pound)US ($0.02)--100%US ($0.01)US ($0.01)-Freight chargesCopper (per dry metric tonne of concentrate)US $58US $58-US $51US $50+2%Zinc (per dry metric tonne of concentrate)US $11US $12-9%US $22US $26-15%(1)2010 charges exclude Ok Tedi charges.Statutory tax rates remain consistentThe table below shows the statutory tax rates for each of our taxable operating mines.20112010changeStatutory tax ratesÇayeli24%24%-Las Cruces30%30%-Pyhäsalmi26%26%-Earnings from operations three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)20112010change20112010changeGross sales$241,059$230,269+5%$979,045$778,556+26%Smelter processing charges and freight(28,228)(35,733)-21%(130,726)(138,464)-6%Cost of sales:Direct production costs(78,456)(75,887)+3%(302,513)(236,124)+28%Inventory changes7,00312,719-45%6666,426-90%Other non-cash expenses(21,685)(19,799)+10%(25,229)(24,161)+4%Depreciation(27,716)(18,882)+47%(108,726)(55,988)+94%Earnings from operations$91,977$92,687-1%$412,517$330,245+25%Significantly higher gross sales this yearthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)20112010change20112010changeGross sales by operationÇayeli$79,656$79,944-$353,706$333,611+6%Las Cruces100,94166,794+51%356,918128,643+177%Pyhäsalmi60,46281,775-26%268,421242,476+11%Other (Troilus)-1,756-100%-73,826-100%$241,059$230,269+5%$979,045$778,556+26%Gross sales by metalCopper$183,155$153,554+19%$696,257$470,378+48%Zinc34,39449,843-31%177,172176,065+1%Gold-1,756-100%-56,672-100%Other23,51025,116-6%105,61675,441+40%$241,059$230,269+5%$979,045$778,556+26%Key components of the increase in sales: increasing gross sales at Las Cruces, no sales at Troilus (millions)three months ended December 31Year ended December 31Higher (lower) copper prices, denominated in Canadian dollars$(27)$36Lower zinc prices, denominated in Canadian dollars(7)(7)Higher (lower) other metal prices(1)162010 gross sales from Troilus(2)(74)Higher sales volumes at Las Cruces46205Higher sales volumes at our other operations225Other-(1)Higher gross sales, compared to 2010$11$200We record sales that settle during the reporting period using the metal price on the day they settle. For sales that have not settled, we use an estimate based on the month we expect the sale to settle and the forward price of the metal at the end of the reporting period. We recognize the difference between our estimate and the final price by adjusting our gross sales in the period when we settle the sale (finalization adjustment).This quarter, we recorded $4 million in positive finalization adjustments from third quarter sales. At the end of this quarter, the following sales had not been settled:21 million pounds of copper provisionally priced at US $3.45 per pound 10 million pounds of zinc provisionally priced at US $0.83 per pound. The finalization adjustment we record for these sales will depend on the actual price we receive when they settle, which can be up to five months from the time we initially record the sales. We expect these sales to settle in the following months:(millions of pounds)copperzincJanuary 20121110February 20124-March 20126-Unsettled sales at December 31, 20112110Significantly higher copper and pyrite sales volumes, no gold sales volumes this yearOur sales volumes are directly affected by the amount of production from our mines and our ability to ship to our customers.Copper production was significantly higher mainly from Las Cruces. Additionally in late 2010, we acquired the 30 percent non-controlling interest in Las Cruces to increase our ownership to 100 percent. This quarter, timing of shipments resulted in copper sales volumes lagging production volumes by a combined 3,000 tonnes at Çayeli and Las Cruces. Zinc production was lower this quarter than in 2010 due to lower zinc grades at Çayeli and Pyhäsalmi, and in line with 2010 production levels this year. We did not produce any gold this year as Troilus ceased production in 2010. Pyhäsalmi's pyrite sales volumes were higher than in 2010 because of increased customer demand in Europe and China. three months ended December 31Year ended December 31Sales volumes20112010(1)change20112010(1)changeCopper contained in concentrate10,3009,200+12%41,20043,300-5%Copper cathode (tonnes)12,8005,500+133%42,00019,100+120%Total copper (tonnes)23,10014,700+57%83,20062,400+33%Zinc (tonnes)17,30021,000-18%84,40080,700+5%Gold (ounces)-1,300-100%-47,300-100%Pyrite (tonnes)175,900178,200-1%809,200573,300+41%Productionthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31objectiveInmet's share(2)20112010(1)Change20112010(1)change2012Copper (tonnes)Çayeli8,6006,700+28%28,70028,200+2%27,000 - 30,000Las Cruces14,1006,900+104%42,10020,600+104%61,700 - 68,600Pyhäsalmi3,5003,900-10%14,00014,700-5%11,300 - 12,600Troilus----2,000-100%-26,20017,500+50%84,80065,500+29%100,000 - 111,200Zinc (tonnes)Çayeli11,30013,100-14%48,10051,300-6%36,000 - 39,800Pyhäsalmi6,6008,200-20%32,30030,100+7%22,800 - 25,20017,90021,300-16%80,40081,400-1%58,800 - 65,000Gold (ounces)Troilus----37,900-100%-Pyrite (tonnes)Pyhäsalmi210,500186,800+13%804,900584,100+38%800,000(1)2010 volumes exclude Ok Tedi.(2)Inmet's share: 100 percent for Çayeli, Pyhäsalmi and Troilus. Our share of Las Cruces was 70 percent until December 15, 2010 and 100 percent after that.2012 outlook for salesWe use our production objectives to estimate our sales target. We expect copper production in 2012 to be significantly higher than 2011 as Las Cruces operates more consistently towards its nameplate capacity of 72,000 tonnes of copper cathode per year. Pyhäsalmi expects its copper production to decrease in 2012 as fewer higher grade stopes are available in the short-term mining sequence. We expect zinc sales volumes to decrease in 2012 as a result of lower zinc production from Çayeli and Pyhäsalmi as they each move towards their average reserve grade of 4.3 percent and 2.1 percent, respectively. Our Canadian dollar sales revenues are affected by the US dollar denominated metal price we receive and the exchange rate between the US dollar and Canadian dollar. According to international research, global copper supply should grow modestly in 2012. New production should be mostly offset by declining production at large existing copper mines and could possibly also be impacted by labour disruptions. Continued strong demand is expected in China, with increasing economic recovery in the United States, and continued interest from investors. Increasing demand, combined with tighter supply, should translate into historically elevated copper prices during 2012.For zinc, modest increases in both market supply and demand are expected, with a decreasing market surplus compared to 2011, which should continue to support prices in 2012 at levels consistent with those of 2011.Lower smelter processing charges this yearthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)20112010change20112010changeSmelter processing charges and freight by operationÇayeli$14,845$16,899-12%$71,704$75,268-5%Las Cruces363271+34%1,227298+312%Pyhäsalmi13,02018,563-30%57,79558,372-1%Other (Troilus)----4,526-100%$28,228$35,733-21%$130,726$138,464-6%Smelter processing charges and freight by metalCopper$11,351$9,799+16%$43,761$43,806-Zinc11,61818,560-37%65,58770,709-7%Other5,2597,374-29%21,37823,949-11%$28,228$35,733-21%$130,726$138,464-6%Smelter processing charges by type, and freightCopper treatment and refining charges$3,803$2,695+41%$14,884$14,855-Zinc treatment charges6,40110,047-36%35,49839,999-11%Copper price participation430547-21%1,5921,800-12%Zinc price participation(670)(41)+1,534%(1,934)(1,987)-3%Content losses9,22811,992-23%43,82345,109-3%Freight8,72410,234-15%35,61237,240-4%Other312259+20%1,2511,448-14%$28,228$35,733-21%$130,726$138,464-6%2012 outlook for smelter processing charges and freight We expect our costs for copper treatment and refining to be slightly higher in 2012 than in 2011. A tight concentrate supply is expected to keep the copper market in a deficit position in 2012 and treatment costs close to this year's level. We do not expect to pay copper price participation.We expect total zinc smelter processing charges, including price participation, to be lower than in 2011 and a continued deficit to exist in the zinc concentrate market.Las Cruces sells its copper cathode production directly to buyers in the Spanish and Mediterranean markets and therefore does not incur smelting processing charges and has relatively low freight costs. We expect our ocean freight costs to be similar to rates realized in 2011.Higher direct production costs and cost of sales three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)20112010change20112010changeDirect production costs by operationÇayeli$24,779$25,584-3%$96,299$90,927+6%Las Cruces39,03935,769+9%147,63666,702+121%Pyhäsalmi14,63814,534+1%58,57854,590+7%Other (Troilus)----23,905-100%Total direct production costs78,45675,887+3%302,513236,124+28%Inventory changes(7,003)(12,719)-45%(666)(6,426)-90%Charges for mine rehabilitation and other non-cash charges21,68519,799+10%25,22924,161+4%Total cost of sales (excluding depreciation)$93,138$82,967+12%$327,076$253,859+29%Direct production costs Direct production costs were $67 million (or 28 percent) higher in 2011 than they were in 2010 mainly because we began recognizing operating results at Las Cruces in our consolidated income statement effective July 1, 2010, somewhat offset by the closure of Troilus in mid-2010. Inventory changes Copper inventories at Çayeli and Las Cruces increased this quarter end and at the end of the fourth quarter of 2010 because of timing of shipments. Charges for mine rehabilitation and other non-cash charges These charges include accruals for asset retirement obligations, provisions for severance and retirement and other non-cash expenses. We recorded an additional $17 million this quarter, and for the year, for post-closure liabilities at our closed properties primarily as a result of a decrease in the discount rates we applied in determining the liabilities. Under IFRS, we are required to revalue our asset retirement obligations for changes in market risk-free interest rates - this discount rate decrease reflects the significantly reduced current interest rate environment and resulted in a charge of $12 million. See note 3 to our interim consolidated financial statements for more detail on how we recognize our asset retirement obligations. Additionally, we recognized a $5 million increase in our estimated closure obligations at Troilus for on-going treatment of tailings effluent for suspended solids and associated labour costs. In 2010, we recorded increased asset retirement obligations of $16 million: $10 million for closure liabilities at Troilus to reflect the longer time we expect will be required for post-closure monitoring, as well as higher owner and other costs, and $6 million from a decrease in the discount rates we applied.2012 outlook for cost of sales (excluding depreciation)We expect consolidated direct production costs to be higher in 2012 because higher production at Las Cruces will increase total variable costs, primarily electricity and royalties. Our budget for 2012 assumes our costs at Çayeli and Pyhäsalmi will be similar to 2011.Certain variable costs may continue to affect our earnings, depending on metal prices:royalties at Çayeli are affected by its net income royalties at Las Cruces are affected by its net sales. The total amount we spend in Canadian dollars will also be affected by the value of the US dollar and euro relative to the Canadian dollar.Additionally, changes in market risk-free interest rates could significantly increase or decrease our costs related to mine rehabilitation at our closed properties. Higher depreciationthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)20112010change20112010changeDepreciation by operationÇayeli$5,568$4,145+34%$22,037$20,577+7%Las Cruces19,75712,516+58%77,39223,068+235%Pyhäsalmi2,3912,193+9%9,2978,281+12%Other (Troilus)-28-100%-4,062-100%$27,716$18,882+47%$108,726$55,988+94%Depreciation was higher this year mainly because Las Cruces only began to depreciate its operating assets in our consolidated income statement on July 1, 2010 and because this operation's production was higher for 2011 than 2010. There was no depreciation at Troilus in 2011 because it stopped operating in mid-2010. 2012 outlook for depreciationWe expect depreciation to be higher in 2012 because of higher production volumes at Las Cruces. Corporate costsCorporate costs include corporate development and exploration, general and administration costs, interest and other income, stand-by costs and taxes. Spending on corporate development and explorationCorporate development and exploration costs were approximately $16 million higher than 2010. In early 2011, we incurred approximately $6 million of expenses related to the arrangement agreement to merge with Lundin Mining Corporation. We mutually agreed to terminate our arrangement agreement on March 29, 2011. All of the costs incurred in connection with the proposed merger were expensed and classified as corporate development and exploration in the consolidated statement of earnings. Increased costs compared to 2010 also reflect our higher budget for 2011 to explore for world class deposits.2012 outlook for corporate development and explorationWe expect to spend more on exploration in 2012, focusing on Mexico, Chile and Peru, where we have established field offices, and on Cobre Panama to drill more exploration targets on the concession there. We will also continue exploring in areas around our existing operations. General and administrationGeneral and administration costs are largely for management remuneration, governance and strategy. Costs in 2011 were $14 million higher than 2010 ($3 million in the fourth quarter) mainly because of increased human resources and other spending as we plan our move forward with Cobre Panama, and the impact of share-based compensation plans adopted this year.2012 outlook for general and administrationWe expect general and administration costs to be higher than 2011 as we expect to continue to increase our human resources as we plan our move forward with Cobre Panama.Investment and other income three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)2011201020112010Interest income$4,821$2,887$16,627$8,234Foreign exchange gain (loss)(8,601)(1,464)10,789(968)Dividend and royalty income1,5086343,0413,173Gain on sale of investment in Premier Gold Mines Ltd.-50,505-50,505Other(1,739)(1,940)268(2,600)$(4,011)$50,622$30,725$58,344Interest income We recognized higher interest income this year because of higher yields on our held to maturity bond portfolio and because of higher cash balances this year.Gain on sale of investment in Premier Gold Mines Ltd (Premier Gold) - 2010We sold 9.45 million common shares of Premier Gold Mines Ltd. in 2010 for $61 million in cash and recognized a gain of $51 million.Foreign exchange gain (loss)We have a foreign exchange gain or loss when we revalue certain foreign denominated assets and liabilities.Our foreign exchange gains (losses) were from:three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)2011201020112010Translation of US dollar cash and held-to-maturity investments held at corporate$(9,029)$(72)$3,338$(47)Translation of Turkish lira taxes payable at Çayeli(287)(1,131)4,027(672)Translation of other monetary assets and liabilities715(228)3,424(249)$(8,601)$(1,431)$10,789$(968)We continue to hold the proceeds from the sale of our equity interest in Ok Tedi in US dollars and plan to use this money to fund our US dollar denominated capital program at Cobre Panama. We have recognized total foreign exchange gains of $3 million this year on these funds because the US dollar appreciated relative to the Canadian dollar. We recognized a foreign exchange loss of $9 million on these funds in the fourth quarter of 2011 as the US dollar depreciated relative to the Canadian dollar. Çayeli's income taxes are denominated in Turkish lira. This operation recognized a foreign exchange gain of $4 million this year from the revaluation of its taxes payable due to the appreciation of the US dollar (Çayeli's functional currency) relative to the Turkish lira.2012 outlook for investment and other incomeInvestment and other income is affected by cash and held to maturity investment balances, and by interest rates and exchange rates. At December 31, 2011, we held US $276 million in cash and held to maturity investments subject to translation in our Canadian accounts. At the end of January 2012, we converted €150 million to US $200 million in one of our euro functional currency companies. This US $200 million will also be subject to translation, but in our euro accounts.Stand-by costs In the first quarter of 2010, we could not mine ore at Las Cruces because of water levels in the pit. We expensed $7 million in operating and maintenance costs for the water purification plant because they did not relate to production activities. Income tax expense three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(thousands)20112010change20112010changeÇayeli$9,754$12,863$52,620$35,885Las Cruces8,362(20)23,536(4,094)Pyhäsalmi6,83012,21331,71928,996Corporate and other(1,717)6,904(2,452)8,300$23,229$31,960$105,423$69,087Consolidated effective tax rate33%25%+8%28%21%+7%Our tax expense changes as our earnings change. The consolidated effective tax rate is higher year to date compared to last year, mainly because in 2010 Las Cruces recognized a tax recovery on a foreign exchange loss from its intercompany US dollar denominated debt. The foreign exchange eliminates on consolidation, but the tax recovery does not since there is no corresponding tax expense on the foreign exchange gain. Additionally, taxes at Çayeli were higher this year as it recognized a tax expense on a foreign exchange gain from its US dollar denominated cash (Çayeli's income taxes are denominated in Turkish lira). Corporate and other taxes were lower this year as there were no mining duties payable after the closure of Troilus in 2010.2012 outlook for income tax expenseFor Pyhäsalmi, the statutory rate should decrease from 26 percent to 24.5 percent based on changes to enacted rates in Finland. We expect all other statutory tax rates at our operations in 2012 to remain the same as they were in 2011, unless a statutory tax rate change is enacted.Discontinued operation We sold our 18 percent equity interest in Ok Tedi in January 2011, and have reported our results relating to Ok Tedi as discontinued operations retroactively. After-tax income of $83 million in 2011 includes net earnings of $17 million in January, before the sale, and a gain on sale of $66 million net of withholding taxes. We paid Papua New Guinea withholding taxes of $28 million on the sale. We did not pay any Canadian taxes, and we have reduced our tax-effected Canadian tax loss pools by about $3 million.Results of our operations2012 estimatesOur financial review by operation includes estimates for our 2012 operating earnings and operating cash flows. We have based these estimates on our 2012 objectives for production (using the midpoints in our production volume ranges) and cost per tonne of ore milled, as well as the following assumptions for the year: Copper priceUS $3.80 per poundZinc priceUS $0.95 per poundUS $ to C$ exchange rate$1.00euro to C$ exchange rate$1.30Working capitalAssume no changes for the yearÇayelithree months ended December 31Year ended December 3120112010change20112010changeTonnes of ore milled (000's)316288+10%1,1951,147+4%Tonnes of ore milled per day3,4003,100+10%3,3003,150+4%Grades (percent)copper3.53.2+9%3.23.2-zinc5.36.5-18%6.06.3-5%Mill recoveries (percent)copper7973+8%7576-1%zinc6770-4%6871-4%Production (tonnes)copper8,6006,70028%28,70028,200+2%zinc11,30013,100-14%48,10051,300-6%Cost per tonne of ore milled (C$)$79$89-11%$81$79+3%Record throughput achieved this year Çayeli's mine production reached a record 1.2 million tonnes this year and set new records for weekly tonnage of 30,160 tonnes and monthly tonnage of 108,100 tonnes. This increase in performance is the result of improved mine planning processes, the implementation of a mine control system, and additional rehabilitation resources. Çayeli's ground conditions require constant monitoring and reinforcement, including the need to minimize any underground void area. The underground void volume was reduced to an all-time low during the year.Mill production this year also reached a record 1.2 million tonnes despite difficult metallurgy from milling five different ore types with some ore types containing bornite minerals. Bornite activates zinc leading to its inclusion in Çayeli's copper concentrate rather than reporting to the zinc concentrate. This reduced the overall metallurgical recoveries for both copper and zinc this year. Copper grades this year were in line with our target and with last year. Copper production was therefore slightly below our expectations. Zinc production was essentially on target because higher grades offset the impact of lower recoveries.Cost per tonne of ore milled was higher than 2010 mainly because consumables, ground control and royalty costs were higher, somewhat offset by the impact of the depreciation of the Turkish lira relative to the US dollar on Turkish lira costs.2012 outlook for productionIn 2012, production levels should remain at approximately 1.2 million tonnes. As the ore pass project progresses, the mine will rely on two rather than three ore passes for much of 2012, reducing flexibility and increasing ore mixing. This will be mitigated by the introduction of a new mining block in 2012 in close proximity to one of the functioning ore passes. Both copper and zinc recoveries should remain near 2011 levels in 2012, reflecting the ongoing metallurgical challenges presented by the higher percentages of bornite containing ores and the decreasing zinc grade. We expect to produce between 27,000 tonnes and 30,000 tonnes of copper and between 36,000 and 39,800 tonnes of zinc. Zinc production at Çayeli from 2008 to 2011 benefitted from grades well above the average reserve grade of 4.3 percent. In 2012, lower zinc grades expected account for the anticipated decline in zinc production.Financial review Higher copper sales volumes offset by lower realized metal prices this quarterthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31objective(millions of Canadian dollars unless otherwise stated)20112010201120102012Sales analysisCopper sales (tonnes)6,9004,80027,50026,30028,500Zinc sales (tonnes)9,90012,70050,00051,20037,900Gross copper sales$54$45$221$205$239Gross zinc sales202910510979Other metal sales66282017Gross sales8080354334335Smelter processing charges and freight(15)(17)(72)(75)(65)Net sales$65$63$282$259$270Cost analysisTonnes of ore milled (thousands)3162881,1951,1471,200Direct production costs ($ per tonne)$79$89$81$79$80Direct production costs$25$26$96$91$96Change in inventory(3)(4)(1)(4)-Depreciation and other non-cash costs74272332Operating costs$29$26$122$110$128Operating earnings$36$37$160$149$142Operating cash flow$8$42$157$116$130The objective for 2012 uses the assumptions listed on page 15.The table below shows what contributed to the change in operating earnings and operating cash flow between 2011 and 2010.(millions)three months ended December 31Year ended December 31Higher (lower) copper prices, denominated in Canadian dollars$(10)$7Lower zinc prices, denominated in Canadian dollars(3)(1)Higher (lower) other metal prices, denominated in Canadian dollars(1)7Higher copper sales volumes186Lower zinc sales volumes(4)(3)Lower smelter processing charges and freight-4Foreign exchange - decreased production costs29Higher production costs denominated in local currencies(1) (14)Other(2) (4)Higher (lower) operating earnings, compared to 2010(1)11Change in tax expense because of change in taxable income7(10)Changes in working capital (see note 20 on page 74)(42)36Other24Higher (lower) operating cash flow, compared to 2010$(34)$41Capital spending three months ended December 31Year ended December 31objective(thousands)20112010change20112010change2012Capital spending$3,500$6,700-48%$13,100$14,900-12%$20,000We spent $13 million this year to engineer a pair of new ore pass upgrades, add to the underground mobile equipment fleet, install copper concentrate column flotation cells, install a conveyor dust collection system in the mill, add surface storm water runoff capacity, and to continue our mine development. In 2010, we spent $15 million to upgrade underground mobile equipment, remediate the head frame, and install a new double deck screen for the crusher and mine development. 2012 outlook for capital spending We expect to spend $20 million on capital in 2012, including $7 million to upgrade our ore pass system to addresses deterioration that has accumulated over time from normal abrasion, and to extend the shotcrete slickline and replace certain mobile equipment.Las Cruces three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(100 percent)20112010change20112010changeTonnes of ore processed (000's)231164+41%776495+57%Copper grades (percent)6.96.4+8%6.57.0-7%Plant recoveries (percent)8686-8483+1%Cathode copper production (tonnes)14,1009,000+57%42,10028,500+48%Cost per pound of cathode produced (C$)(1)$1.25$1.80-31%$1.59$1.74-9%(1)Subsequent to July 1, 2010Improved plant performanceLas Cruces production in 2011 was significantly higher than 2010, increasing to 42,100 tonnes of copper cathode from 28,500 tonnes. In the fourth quarter of 2011, Las Cruces produced 14,100 tonnes, and finished the year with monthly production above 5,000 tonnes. In the last two weeks of 2011, we sustained recoveries above 88 percent at increased throughput levels and cathode production approached design capacity.Plant reliability and process stability continued to improve throughout the year while copper recoveries increased. In the area of process stability, the largest gains were from improvements to the grinding thickener and oxygen distribution within the leach reactors. Plant reliability has been enhanced by the addition of surge capacity with the leach feed tank and the leach residue tank ahead of the leach filters. Better control of the precipitated solids and redundant pipelines has greatly reduced the downtime experienced previously to clean key components. Rebuilding of the grinding thickener in June was successful in allowing us to reach the designed density for feeding the leach circuit and controlling the leach chemistry. During the year we progressively improved oxygen distributors in the leach reactors and now have a design that allows effective use of the oxygen in the reaction. We completed our program to change all 8 leach reactor agitators to fully stainless steel components and agitator wear has been well controlled. Our water purification and drainage and reinjection well systems performed well this year. We have completed and commissioned all phases of the water purification plant, which has increased our treatment capacity. The addition of new dewatering wells has further reduced pit inflows over the course of the year and at year end, pit and pond water levels were well controlled. Notwithstanding the significant improvements achieved this year, production fell short of our target of 50,200 tonnes of copper cathode. Cost per pound of cathode produced this quarter was significantly lower than earlier in the year and in the same quarter of 2010, as higher production translated into a lower unit cost. 2012 outlook for productionFor 2012, we expect throughput and recoveries to stabilize at the high levels we achieved towards the end of 2011. We have set our production objective as a range of 61,700 to 68,600 tonnes copper cathode, or approximately 90 percent of design capacity. No major construction projects are planned for the year. Routine maintenance is planned for mill relining, solids management and thickener inspection. Additional strengthening of the grinding thickener will take place during our planned shutdown activities to add security to this critical equipment. In total, we expect a minimum of 90 percent operating time throughout 2012.Las Cruces' unit operating costs should continue to decrease as production volumes increase.Financial review Higher operating earnings and operating cash flow this year as Las Cruces ramps upthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31objective(millions of Canadian dollars unless otherwise stated)2011201020112010(1)2012Sales analysisCopper sales (tonnes)12,8007,60042,00015,60065,200Gross copper sales$101$67$357$129$551Smelter processing charges and freight--(1)-(3)Net sales$101$67$356$129$548Cost analysisPounds of copper produced (millions)31209338144Direct production costs ($ per pound)$1.25$1.80$1.591.74$1.14Direct production costs$3936$148$67$164Change in inventory(3)(10)1(11)-Depreciation and other non-cash costs2317812892Operating costs$59$43$230$84$256Operating earnings$42$24$126$45$292Operating cash flow$46$34$195$59$385(1)Subsequent to July 1, 2010 and at 100 percent The objective for 2012 uses the assumptions listed on page 15.The table below shows what contributed to the change in operating earnings and operating cash flow between 2011 and 2010.(millions)three months ended December 31Year ended December 31Higher (lower) copper prices, denominated in Canadian dollars$(12)$23Higher copper sales volumes due to higher production39193Higher smelter processing charges and freights-(1)Higher operating costs due to higher production(3)(80)Higher depreciation(6)(54)Higher operating earnings, compared to 20101881Changes in working capital (see note 20 on page 74)(15)(9)Change in depreciation654Standby charges in 2010-7Other33Higher operating cash flow, compared to 2010$12$136Capital spendingthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31objective(100 percent and millions of Canadian dollars)20112010change20112010change2012Capital$10$28-64%$54$80-33%$48Pre-operating costs capitalized, net of sales, working capital and other-4-100%-(56)-100%-$10$32-69%$54$24+125%$48Capital spending in 2011 and 2010 was mainly for plant improvements, the permanent water purification plant and mine development. 2012 outlook for capital spendingWe expect to spend $48 million on capital projects in 2012. The largest expenditures will come in the areas of mine development, tailings facility expansion and land purchase. Pyhäsalmithree months ended December 31Year ended December 3120112010change20112010changeTonnes of ore milled (000's)348350-1%1,3861,401-1%Tonnes of ore milled per day3,8003,800-3,8003,800-1%Grades (percent)copper1.11.2-8%1.11.1-zinc2.12.6-19%2.62.4+8%sulphur4343-4243-2%Mill recoveries (percent)copper9596-1%9696-zinc9089+1%9190+1%Production (tonnes)copper3,5003,900-10%14,00014,700-5%zinc6,6008,200-20%32,30030,100+7%pyrite210,500186,800+13%804,900584,100+38%Cost per tonne of ore milled (C$)$42$42-$42$39+8%Record pyrite production and salesPyhäsalmi maintained its strong performance in 2011, processing 1.4 million tonnes of ore through the mill and achieving copper recoveries of 96 percent and zinc recoveries of 91 percent. Backfill supply was reliable and the underground open void volume was maintained at planned levels.Copper production in 2011 was higher than target and lower than 2010 because of variations in copper grades. Zinc grades were significantly higher than last year, pushing zinc production higher. A record 805,000 tonnes of pyrite concentrate was produced this year to meet higher customer demand. Operating costs have been higher this year mostly because of increased ground support and consumables costs, and due to the incremental costs associated with producing more pyrite. 2012 outlook for productionPyhäsalmi expects to mine 1.4 million tonnes of approximately 1 percent copper and 2 percent zinc in 2012, and produce between 11,300 tonnes and 12,600 tonnes of copper and 22,800 tonnes and 25,200 tonnes of zinc. Copper and zinc production should be lower than 2011 as fewer higher grade stopes are available in the short-term mining sequence. Both copper and zinc grades should recover after 2012.Pyhäsalmi expects to produce and sell 800,000 tonnes of pyrite in 2012. Financial reviewHigher earnings this year because of significantly higher pyrite sales volumesthree months ended December 31Year ended December 31objective(millions of Canadian dollars unless otherwise stated)20112010201120102012Sales analysisCopper sales (tonnes)3,4004,50013,70014,80011,900Zinc sales (tonnes)7,4008,30034,40029,50024,000Pyrite sales (tonnes)175,900178,200809,200573,300800,000Gross copper sales$28$42$118$121$100Gross zinc sales1521726750Other metal sales1719785460Gross sales6082268242210Smelter processing charges and freight(13)(19)(58)(58)(41)Net sales47$63$210$184$169Cost analysisTonnes of ore milled (thousands)3483501,3861,4011,370Direct production costs ($ per tonne)$42$42$42$39$43Direct production costs$15$15$59$55$58Change in inventory(1)1(1)--Depreciation and other non-cash costs229910Operating costs$16$18$67$64$68Operating earnings$31$45$143$120$101Operating cash flow$24$27$118$80$85The objective for 2012 uses the assumptions listed on page 15.The table below shows what contributed to the change in operating earnings and operating cash flow between 2011 and 2010. (millions)three months ended December 31Year ended December 31Higher (lower) copper prices, denominated in Canadian dollars$(5)$6Lower zinc prices, denominated in Canadian dollars(4)(6)Higher other metal prices-8Higher (lower) sales volumes(9)15Lower smelter processing prices and freight44Higher operating costs-(4)Higher (lower) operating earnings, compared to 2010(14)23Change in tax expense because of change in earnings3(6)Changes in working capital (see note 20 on page 74)918Other(1)3Higher (lower) operating cash flow, compared to 2010$(3)$38Capital spending three months ended December 31Year ended December 31objective(thousands)20112010change20112010change2012Capital spending$2,000$700+186%$7,300$4,000+83%$10,0002012 outlook for capital spendingCapital spending of $10 million in 2012 will primarily be to replace underground mobile equipment, improve the tailings impoundment area, and upgrade the satellite ore grinding circuit and zinc cleaner cells.Status of our development projectCobre PanamaEngineering and infrastructure Basic engineering progressed this quarter and we expect to conclude and report on basic engineering in the second quarter of 2012. We made progress with several early works projects in the quarter in preparation for a final notice to proceed with construction, including the start of construction on a pioneer road and other road by-passes, preparation for bridge construction, and initiation of several permits required for additional work. ESIA approval by ANAM On December 28, 2011, the Government of Panama, through ANAM, approved the ESIA required for development of Cobre Panama, including the mining operations and related infrastructure, a port facility and a coal-fired power plant. The ESIA describes the existing socio-environmental conditions in the project area, the likely impacts and benefits that will result from the project and the commitments that MPSA will undertake to minimize the impacts and enhance the benefits. KPMC decision to exercise Cobre Panama option Our announcement of the approval of the ESIA on January 3, 2012 triggered a seven-day period by which KPMC was required to provide Inmet and MPSA with notice as to its election to acquire a 20 percent interest in MPSA. On January 10, 2012, Inmet and MPSA received formal written notice from KPMC that KPMC elected under its option agreement to acquire a 20 percent interest in MPSA. The option agreement, announced October 28, 2009, requires KPMC to invest approximately US $155 million in exchange for its 20 percent interest in the project. The US $155 million investment represents KPMC's share of historical development costs incurred to the date of the option agreement and its proportionate share of development costs incurred above a cap of US $150 million. We expect the transaction with KPMC to close by the end of February 2012. Partnership processWe continue to engage with potential new partners in Cobre Panama. Interested parties are engaged at various stages of due diligence under confidentiality agreements. 2012 outlook for developmentWe plan to:continue to build our privilege to operate through intensive dialogue with stakeholders at the community, regional and national levels, to increase their understanding of the project and its benefits to Panama, and our understanding of their potential concerns continue to improve site access and infrastructure, including the completion of early works projects that will facilitate contractors' mobilization for site capture complete additional work on resource definition, metallurgical recoveries, pit design and other engineering to allow us to include the Balboa and Brazo mineralization in our mine plan for Cobre Panama complete basic engineering and prepare to initiate site capture upon receipt of the main permits continue to work with SK Engineering and Construction to complete basic engineering for the coal-fired power plant and begin detail engineering and procurement develop a range of financing options including a project level limited recourse facility, capital market alternatives and potential new partners update the capital and operating expenditure estimates for the development project at the conclusion of basic engineering develop and implement, with the assistance of our EP+CM contractors, project specific Health & Safety and Environmental and Social mitigation plans that are consistent with the ESIA and Inmet's corporate responsibility standards continue to grow the strength of our management team and human resources dedicated to the project. After basic engineering is completed and we have received the appropriate approvals, site capture, preparation and construction should take approximately 48 months.We expect to spend $105 million on a 100 percent basis in the first quarter of 2012 to carry out work on the Cobre Panama project up to the point of consideration of a final decision to proceed with construction. Further capital expenditure guidance for 2012 will be provided after a decision is made.Managing our liquidityWe develop our financing strategy by considering our long-term capital requirements and deciding on the optimal mix of cash, future operating cash flow, credit facilities and project financing. Our capital structure includes a liquidity cushion that gives us the flexibility to deal with operational disruptions or general market downturns. three months ended December 31Year ended December 31(millions)2011201020112010CASH FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIESÇayeli$8$42$157$117Las Cruces463419559Pyhäsalmi242711880Other (Troilus)---44Corporate development and exploration not incurred by operations(5)(4)(21)(9)General and administration(8)(5)(34)(20)Settlement of asset retirement obligations at closed sites(4)(4)(11)(10)Investment income and other1211(6)7391405255CASH FROM INVESTING AND FINANCINGPurchase of property, plant and equipment(59)(59)(209)(128)Purchase and maturing of long-term investments, net1426(233)(270)Foreign exchange on cash held in foreign operations(24)(11)(5)(27)Issuance of common shares--502-Acquisition of non-controlling interest in Las Cruces-(151)-(151)Sale of Premier Gold Mines Ltd.-61-61Other(11)10(10)22(80)(124)45(493)CASH FROM DISCONTINUED OPERATION (OK TEDI)-(65)30730Increase (decrease) in cash(7)(98)757(208)Cash and short-term investmentsBeginning of period1,090424326534End of period$1,083$326$1,083$326Our available liquidity also includes $623 million of held to maturity investments ($373 million at December 31, 2010), providing a total of $1,706 million in cash available to finance our growth strategy as at December 31, 2011 ($699 million at December 31, 2010).OPERATING ACTIVITIESKey components of the change in operating cash flows (millions)three months ended December 31Year ended December 31Higher (lower) earnings from operations (see page 5)$(1)$83Add back higher depreciation included in earnings from operations953Lower (higher) income tax expense because of change in taxable earnings12(7)Higher corporate development and administrative costs(4)(30)Realized foreign exchange loss on cash held by Inmet corporate-(8)Standby charges in 2010 at Las Cruces-7Changes in working capital (see note 20 on page 74)(46)38Other1214Higher (lower) operating cash flow, compared to 2010$(18)$150Operating cash flows for the fourth quarter were lower than 2010 because working capital was higher mainly due to the timing of tax installment payments.Operating cash flows this year were higher than 2010 because:our operating earnings before depreciation were higher working capital was lower at year end because metal prices and, therefore, accounts receivable balances were lower, and from the timing of payments from customers. 2012 outlook for cash from operating activitiesThe table below shows expected operating cash flow from our operations, based on our outlook for metal prices and production (see page 15), and on the assumptions in Results of our operations (starting on page 15). 2012 estimated operating cash flow by operation (millions)Çayeli$130Las Cruces385Pyhäsalmi85$600INVESTING AND FINANCINGCapital spending three months ended December 31Year ended December 31objective(millions)20112010201120102012Çayeli$4$7$13$15$20Las Cruces1032542448Pyhäsalmi217410Cobre Panama431913385105(1)$59$59$207$128$183(1)represents expected spending in the first quarter of 2012 to carry out work up to the point of a final decision to proceed with construction. Further capital spending guidance will be provided after a decision is made. Please see Results of our operations and Status of our development project on page 22 for a discussion of actual results and our 2012 objective. Capital spending this year was mainly for Cobre Panama. Purchase of long-term investmentsIn 2011, we used most of the US dollar proceeds from the sale of Ok Tedi to buy US $274 million in US Treasury bonds with AA credit ratings. The bonds mature between March 2012 and January 2016 and have a weighted average annual yield to maturity of 1.2 percent. In 2010, we bought $296 million in medium-term Canadian government and corporate bonds with credit ratings of A to AAA.Acquisition of non-controlling interest in Las Cruces - 2010 We paid $151 million in cash and 5.4 million Inmet common shares to acquire Leucadia's 30 percent indirect equity interest and subordinated sponsor loans in Las Cruces.Sale of investment in Premier Gold - 2010 We sold our 9.45 million common shares of Premier Gold for $61.4 million in cash.Proceeds from issuing common shares On May 17, 2011, a subsidiary of Temasek Holdings (Private) Ltd. exchanged its subscriptions receipts for 7.78 million Inmet common shares and we received $500 million in cash, plus accrued interest on funds in escrow during the subscription period.Cash from discontinued operationIn January 2011, we sold our 18 percent equity interest in Ok Tedi for net proceeds of $307 million (after Papua New Guinea withholding taxes). 2012 outlook for investing and financingCapital spendingWe expect capital spending to be $183 million in 2012. The more significant items include: $48 million at Las Cruces, including $22 million for mine development, as well as several smaller expenditures including a tailings facility expansion, land purchase and certain plant improvements $105 million on a 100 percent basis at Cobre Panama in the first quarter of 2012 In January 2012, we received notice from KPMC that it had elected, under its option agreement, to acquire a 20 percent interest in MPSA. This transaction is expected to close by the end of February 2012. At closing, KPMC would be required to invest approximately US $155 million into MPSA, representing KPMC's share of historical development costs incurred to the date of the option agreement and their proportionate share of development costs incurred above a funding cap of US $150 million. After closing, KPMC would continue to fund its 20 percent share of the development costs of Cobre Panama and would enter into an off-take agreement, enabling KPMC to purchase a 20 percent share of MPSA's concentrates production on arm's length market terms, subject to KPMC's arranging for related financing.Financial conditionOur strategy is to ensure we have sufficient liquidity (including cash and committed credit facilities) to finance our operating requirements as well as our growth projects. At December 31, 2011, we had $1,706 million in total funds, including $1,083 million in cash and short-term investments and $623 million invested in long-term bonds.CashAt December 31, 2011, cash and short-term investments of $1,083 million included cash and money market instruments that mature in 90 days or less, and short-term investments that mature in 91 days to a year. Our policy is to invest excess cash in highly liquid investments of the highest credit quality, and to limit our exposure to individual counterparties to minimize the risk associated with these investments. We base our decisions about the length of maturities on our cash flow requirements, rates of return and other factors.At December 31, 2011, we held cash and short-term investments in the following:A to AAA rated treasury funds and money market funds managed by leading international fund managers, who are investing in money market and short-term debt securities and fixed income securities issued by leading international financial institutions and their sponsored securitization vehicles. Cash, term and overnight deposits with leading Canadian and international financial institutions. See note 7 on page 67 in the consolidated financial statements for more details about where our cash is invested.Medium-term bonds We have created a bond portfolio to provide better yields with no change to our investment risk. As at December 31, 2011, the portfolio was $623 million (Held to maturity investments - note 9): 58 percent US Treasury bonds 4 percent Government of Canada bonds 33 percent Canadian Provincial Government bonds 5 percent corporate bonds. The bonds mature between January 2012 and August 2016. Although our intention is to hold these investments to maturity, there is a liquid market for them and they are available to us at any time.Restricted cashOur restricted cash balance of $73 million as at December 31, 2011 included:$17 million in cash collateralized letters of credit for Inmet $54 million at Las Cruces related to a reclamation bond, issuing letters of credit to suppliers and the local water authority and for its labour bond to the government $2 million for future reclamation at Pyhäsalmi. COMMON SHARESCommon shares outstanding as of December 31, 2011 and February 9, 201269,332,492Deferred share units outstanding as of December 31, 2011 (redeemable on a one-for-one basis for common shares)121,069Accounting changesAdoption of International Financial Reporting StandardsThe Accounting Standards Board incorporated International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) into the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants Accounting Handbook effective for interim and annual financial statements relating to fiscal years beginning on or after January 1, 2011. The first quarter of 2011 was the first presentation of our results under IFRS, with an effective transition date of January 1, 2010. While the adoption of IFRS did not change our business activities, it has significantly changed our reported financial position. Our key controls over financial reporting did not change as a result of our transition to IFRS. For all changes to policies and procedures that have been identified, the effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures has been assessed and any required changes have been implemented. In addition, controls over the IFRS changeover process have been implemented as necessary.See note 3 to our interim consolidated financial statements for a complete list of our significant accounting policies followed on adoption of IFRS. See note 6 to the financial statements for a detailed description of our conversion to IFRS, including a line-by-line reconciliation of our financial statements previously prepared under Canadian GAAP to those under IFRS for the three months and year ended December 31, 2010. The table below reconciles total equity under Canadian GAAP to total equity under IFRS, and illustrates the after-tax effect that each of the most significant adjustments had on equity.NotesJanuary 1, 2010December 31, 2010Canadian GAAP equity$2,238,145$2,758,484IFRS adjustments:Reclassification of non-controlling interest to equity78,005-Revenue recognitioni14,21030,023Reversal of impairment of assets - Çayeliii42,39534,005Provision for asset retirement obligationsiii(38,349)(41,310)Acquisition of the non-controlling interest in Las Crucesiv-(254,056)Property, plant and equipment associated with asset retirement obligationsv8,30412,175Other18,70215,218IFRS equity$2,361,412$2,554,539i) Revenue Under Canadian GAAP, we recognized revenue when title was legally transferred to the purchaser. For certain shipments at Çayeli, Pyhäsalmi and Ok Tedi, we transfer title when we receive the first provisional payment, which is later than the transfer point for risks and rewards of ownership.Under IFRS, we recognize revenue when all significant risks and rewards of ownership of our products are transferred to the purchaser. ii) Impairment of assetsUnder Canadian GAAP, we used a two-step approach to impairment testing: first comparing asset carrying values with undiscounted future cash flows to determine whether impairment exists then measuring any impairment by comparing asset carrying values with fair values (generally assessed using a discounted cash flow valuation process). Under IFRS we use a one-step approach to test for and measure impairment, and compare asset carrying values directly with the higher of fair value less costs to sell and value in use (which uses discounted future cash flows). IFRS also requires a full or partial reversal of previous impairment losses when circumstances have changed and the impairments have been reduced. Impairment losses were not reversed under Canadian GAAP. We increased January 1, 2010 property plant and equipment at Çayeli by approximately $50 million to reverse an impairment charge we recognized for this operation in 1996. The increase results in the IFRS carrying amount we would have calculated, net of depreciation, if we had not recognized the original impairment. This will also result in a higher ongoing depreciation expense for Çayeli, including an increase of $8 million for the year ended December 31, 2010.iii) Asset retirement obligationsUnder Canadian GAAP, we used a credit adjusted risk free interest rate to measure asset retirement obligations and were not required to update the rate when market rates changed. Under IFRS, we measure asset retirement obligations using a risk free interest rate and revalue when market risk free interest rates change.iv) Business combinationsUnder Canadian GAAP, companies that acquired an additional interest in an entity they already controlled accounted for it as a step acquisition. Under IFRS, acquiring a non-controlling interest is not considered a business combination, and is instead accounted for as an equity transaction.Under IFRS, we have accounted for our acquisition of the remaining 30 percent interest in Las Cruces in December 2010 as an equity transaction, because we already controlled it. We recognized the difference between the non-controlling interest (as determined under IFRS) and the fair value of the consideration paid in retained earnings.v) First time adoption of IFRS: property, plant and equipment associated with asset retirement obligationsFirst time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS 1) provides specific exemptions that we used when we adopted IFRS. IFRS and Canadian GAAP both require us to recognize a corresponding change in asset retirement obligations in the carrying value of the related property, plant and equipment (where we identify an asset) and depreciate this amount prospectively. The amount under IFRS was different from the amount determined under Canadian GAAP because of the different way asset retirement obligations are measured under IFRS. We used an optional transitional calculation to determine the property, plant and equipment associated with our provision for asset retirement obligations. Under the transitional calculation, we measured the provision at the transition date and discounted it to the date the liability first arose. The result became the initial asset value. Depreciation was applied to this value. We applied this exemption to certain mines instead of determining property, plant and equipment associated with asset retirement obligations retrospectively.Supplementary financial informationPages 31 and 32 include supplementary financial information about cash costs. These measures do not fall into the category of International Financial Reporting Standards. We use unit cash cost information as a key performance indicator, both on a segmented and consolidated basis. We have included cash costs as supplementary information because we believe our key stakeholders use these measures as a financial indicator of our profitability and cash flows before the effects of capital investment and financing costs, such as interest. Since cash costs are not recognized financial measures under International Financial Reporting Standards, they should not be considered in isolation of earnings or cash flows. There is also no standard way to calculate cash costs, so they are not a reliable way to compare us to other companies.About InmetInmet is a Canadian-based global mining company that produces copper, zinc and pyrite. We have three wholly-owned mining operations: Çayeli (Turkey), Las Cruces (Spain) and Pyhäsalmi (Finland). We also have a 100 percent interest in Cobre Panama, a development property in Panama.This press release is also available at www.inmetmining.com.Fourth quarter conference call Will be held onFriday, February 10, 2012 8:30 a.m. Eastern Time webcast available at http://events.digitalmedia.telus.com/inmet/021012/index.php or www.inmetmining.comYou can also dial in by callingLocal or international: +1.416.695.6616 Toll-free within North America: +1.800.952.6845 Starting at approximately 10:30 a.m. (ET) Friday, February 10, 2012, a conference call replay will be availableLocal or international: +1.905.694.9451 passcode 7433427 Toll-free within North America: +1.800.408.3053 passcode 7433427 INMET MINING CORPORATIONSupplementary financial informationCash costs 2011 For the year ended December 31per pound of copperÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMITOTAL(US dollars)Direct production costs$1.35$1.55$1.93$1.54Royalties and variable compensation0.180.07-0.10Smelter processing charges and freight1.480.011.160.70Metal credits(2.41)-(4.02)(1.48)Cash cost$0.60$1.63$(0.93)$0.862010 For the year ended December 31per pound of copperÇAYELILAS CRUCES (1)PYHÄSALMITOTAL(US dollars)Direct production costs$1.28$1.64$1.63$1.46Royalties and variable compensation0.140.06-0.08Smelter processing charges and freight1.410.011.111.01Metal credits(2.19)-(3.02)(1.91)Cash cost$0.64$1.71$(0.28)$0.64Reconciliation of cash costs to statements of earnings2011 For the year ended December 31per pound of copper(millions of Canadian dollars, except where otherwise noted)ÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMITOTALGAAP referencepage 17page 19page 21Direct production costs$96$148$59$303Smelter processing charges and freight72158131By product sales(133)-(150)(283)Adjust smelter processing and freight, and sales to production basis358Operating costs net of metal credits$38$149$(28)$159US$ to C$ exchange rate$0.99$0.99$0.99$0.99Inmet's share of production (000's)63,30092,90030,800187,000Cash cost (US dollars)$0.60$1.63$(0.93)$0.862010 For the year ended December 31per pound of copper(millions of Canadian dollars, except where otherwise noted)ÇAYELILAS CRUCES (1)PYHÄSALMITOTALGAAP referencepage 17page 19page 21Direct production costs$91$67$55$213Smelter processing charges and freight75-58133By product sales(129)-(121)(250)Adjust smelter processing and freight, and sales to production basis4-(1)3Operating costs net of metal credits$41$67$(9)$99US$ to C$ exchange rate$1.03$1.03$1.03$1.03Inmet's share of production (000's)62,10028,20032,400122,700Cash cost (US dollars)$0.64$1.71$(0.28)$0.64(1) Las Cruces' results are included from July 1, 2010 INMET MINING CORPORATIONSupplementary financial informationCash costs2011 For the three months ended December 31 per pound of copperÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMITOTAL(US dollars)Direct production costs$1.15$1.19$1.86$1.27Royalties and variable compensation0.090.05-0.06Smelter processing charges and freight1.130.010.920.50Metal credits(1.71)-(3.36)(1.01)Cash cost$0.66$1.25$(0.58)$0.822010 For the three months ended December 31 per pound of copperÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMITOTAL(US dollars)Direct production costs$1.50$1.75$1.69$1.64Royalties and variable compensation0.220.06-0.11Smelter processing charges and freight1.610.011.240.89Metal credits(2.76)-(3.85)(1.90)Cash cost$0.57$1.82$(0.92)$0.74Reconciliation of cash costs to statements of earnings2011 For the three months ended December 31 per pound of copper(millions of Canadian dollars, except where otherwise noted)ÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMITOTALGAAP referencepage 17page 19page 21Direct production costs$25$39$15$79Smelter processing charges and freight15-1328By product sales(26)-(32)(58)Adjust smelter processing and freight, and sales to production basis(2)--(2)Operating costs net of metal credits$12$39$(4)$47US$ to C$ exchange rate$1.02$1.02$1.02$1.02Inmet's share of production (000's)19,00031,1007,70057,800Cash cost (US dollars)$0.66$1.25$(0.58)$0.822010 For the three months ended December 31 per pound of copper(millions of Canadian dollars, except where otherwise note)ÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMITOTALGAAP referencepage 17page 19page 21Direct production costs$26$36$15$77Smelter processing charges and freight17-1936By product sales(35)-(40)(75)Adjust smelter processing and freight, and sales to production basis1-(2)(1)Operating costs net of metal credits$9$36$(8)$37US$ to C$ exchange rate$1.01$1.01$1.01$1.01Inmet's share of production (000's)14,60015,2008,50038,300Cash cost (US dollars)$0.57$1.82$(0.92)$0.74INMET MINING CORPORATIONQuarterly review(unaudited)Latest Four Quarters(thousands of Canadian dollars, except per share amounts)2011 Fourth quarter2011 Third quarter2011 Second quarter2011 First quarterSTATEMENTS OF EARNINGSGross sales$241,059$261,757$221,952$254,277Smelter processing charges and freight(28,228)(37,043)(33,870)(31,585)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(93,138)(81,144)(73,644)(79,150)Depreciation(27,716)(27,321)(26,649)(27,040)91,977116,24987,789116,502Corporate development and exploration(6,541)(4,688)(4,562)(13,411)General and administration(7,734)(9,987)(8,258)(8,422)Investment and other income(4,011)35,7784,731(5,773)Finance costs(2,390)(2,377)(2,386)(2,331)Income tax expense(23,229)(33,770)(21,264)(27,160)Income from continuing operations48,072101,20556,05059,405Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)---83,439Net income attributable to Inmet equity holders$48,072$101,205$56,050$142,844Income from continuing operations per shareBasic$0.69$1.46$0.86$0.97Diluted$0.69$1.46$0.86$0.96Income from discontinuing operations per shareBasic$-$-$-$1.36Diluted$-$-$-$1.35Net Income per shareBasic$0.69$1.46$0.86$2.33Diluted$0.69$1.46$0.86$2.31INMET MINING CORPORATIONQuarterly review (continued)(unaudited)Previous Four Quarters(thousands of Canadian dollars, except per share amounts)2010(1) Fourth quarter2010(1) Third quarter2010(1) Second quarter2010(1) First quarterSTATEMENTS OF EARNINGSGross sales$230,269$225,960$161,165$161,162Smelter processing charges and freight(35,733)(34,358)(35,272)(33,101)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(82,967)(70,503)(48,123)(52,266)Depreciation(18,882)(19,062)(10,328)(7,716)92,687102,03767,44268,079Corporate development and exploration(5,434)(2,758)(2,524)(2,779)General and administration(4,758)(3,985)(6,200)(5,421)Investment and other income50,6223,1973,3211,204Stand-by costs---(6,753)Finance costs(4,294)(5,239)(1,770)(1,873)Income tax expense(31,960)(25,266)(8,775)(3,086)Income from continuing operations96,86367,98651,49449,371Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)47,99333,56912,47530,718Net income$144,856$101,555$63,969$80,089Net income attributable to:Inmet equity holders$146,932$91,678$68,495$84,771Non-controlling interest(2,076)9,877(4,526)(4,682)$144,856$101,555$63,969$80,089Income from continuing operations per shareBasic$1.73$1.04$1.00$0.96Diluted$1.73$1.04$1.00$0.96Income from discontinuing operations per shareBasic$0.84$0.60$0.22$0.55Diluted$0.84$0.60$0.22$0.55Net Income per shareBasic$2.57$1.64$1.22$1.51Diluted$2.57$1.64$1.22$1.51(1) Information from 2010 restated in accordance with IFRS, including presentation of our share of Ok Tedi as discontinued operations.(2) Information from 2009 is presented in accordance with Canadian GAAP and was not required to be restated to IFRS. Consolidated financial statementsINMET MINING CORPORATIONConsolidated statements of financial position(unaudited)(thousands of Canadian dollars)Note referenceDecember 31, 2011December 31, 2010(1)January 1, 2010(1)AssetsCurrent assets:Cash and short term investments7$1,082,893$326,425$533,913Restricted cash881061715,130Accounts receivable105,213119,426155,761Inventories90,53372,15498,324Current portion of held to maturity investments9181,69953,9159,993Assets held for sale10-319,082-1,461,148891,619813,121Restricted cash871,82270,059101,589Property, plant and equipment1,830,9921,736,0651,945,669Investments in equity securities3,1612,69442,411Held to maturity investments9441,775318,61589,891Deferred income tax assets3278,7212,360Other assets1,4252,3351,903Total assets$3,810,650$3,030,108$2,996,944LiabilitiesCurrent liabilities:Accounts payable and accrued liabilities11$143,149$136,345$170,524Provisions1213,51717,66817,417Derivatives--1,543Liabilities associated with assets held for sale10-111,896-156,666265,909189,484Long-term debt17,12616,619200,026Provisions12175,609162,399196,430Other liabilities17,71918,11720,695Derivatives--3,165Deferred income tax liabilities29,28212,52525,732Total liabilities396,402475,569635,532Commitments and contingencies21EquityShare capital131,591,9481,089,576669,952Contributed surplus66,75266,13164,809Share based compensation148,5276,5425,170Retained earnings1,911,8051,577,5071,527,109Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)15(164,784)(185,217)19,093Total equity attributable to Inmet equity holders3,414,2482,554,5392,286,133Non-controlling interest--75,279Total equity3,414,2482,554,5392,361,412Total liabilities and equity$3,810,650$3,030,108$2,996,944(1) Refer to note 6 for effects of adoption of IFRS (See accompanying notes)INMET MINING CORPORATIONSegmented statements of financial position(unaudited) 2011 As at December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)AssetsCash and short-term investments$734,794$137,590$136,128$47,623$26,758$-$1,082,893Other current assets189,74946,19786,68353,5972,029-378,255Restricted cash16,842-53,3641,616--71,822Property, plant and equipment1,236142,260897,86068,274721,362-1,830,992Investments in equity securities3,161-----3,161Held to maturity investments359,45282,323----441,775Other non-current assets1,303449----1,752$1,306,537$408,819$1,174,035$171,110$750,149$-$3,810,650LiabilitiesCurrent liabilities$22,006$42,822$54,898$16,957$19,983$-$156,666Long-term debt17,126-----17,126Provisions71,08318,02355,62630,877--175,609Other liabilities676-17,043---17,719Deferred income tax liabilities--17,65611,626--29,282$110,891$60,845$145,223$59,460$19,983$-$396,4022010 As at December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)AssetsCash and short-term investments$53,184$107,750$59,866$97,056$8,569$-$326,425Other current assets60,78558,95959,60266,193686318,969565,194Restricted cash16,906-51,5211,632--70,059Property, plant and equipment779152,653941,43466,984574,215-1,736,065Investments in equity securities2,694-----2,694Held to maturity investments253,74964,866----318,615Other non-current assets9525,7544,350---11,056$389,049$389,982$1,116,773$231,865$583,470$318,969$3,030,108LiabilitiesCurrent liabilities$30,286$39,654$47,220$28,913$7,940$111,896$265,909Long-term debt16,619-----16,619Provisions57,53621,60756,43926,817--162,399Other liabilities676-17,441---18,117Deferred income tax liabilities176--12,349--12,525$105,293$61,261$121,100$68,079$7,940$111,896$475,569INMET MINING CORPORATIONSegmented statements of financial position (continued)(unaudited)2010 As at January 1CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)AssetsCash and short-term investments$251,570$158,631$10,039$66,314$10,728$36,631$533,913Other current assets37,59140,34173,50149,88246877,425279,208Restricted cash16,492-56,8781,854-26,365101,589Property, plant and equipment13,508168,3891,034,94772,183537,251119,3911,945,669Investments in equity securities42,411-----42,411Held to maturity investments89,891-----89,891Other non-current assets7292,196412--9264,263$452,192$369,557$1,175,777$190,233$548,447$260,738$2,996,944LiabilitiesCurrent liabilities$42,278$35,144$29,173$27,665$10,855$44,369$189,484Long-term debt18,094-181,932---200,026Provisions56,28121,21455,92921,522-41,484196,430Other liabilities676-20,019---20,695Derivatives-----3,1653,165Deferred income tax liabilities3,128--11,448-11,15625,732$120,457$56,358$287,053$60,635$10,855$100,174$635,532INMET MINING CORPORATIONConsolidated statements of changes in equity(unaudited)Attributable to Inmet equity holdersNon-controlling interestTotal equity(thousands of Canadian dollars)Share CapitalRetained earningsContributed surplusShare based compensationAccumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(note 13)TotalBalance as at January 1, 2010(1)$669,952$1,527,109$64,809$5,170$19,093$2,286,133$75,279$2,361,412Comprehensive income-391,876--(197,405)194,471(8,312)186,159Equity settled share-based compensation plans--1,3221,372-2,694-2,694Dividends on common shares-(11,210)---(11,210)-(11,210)Acquisition of non-controlling interest in Las Cruces419,624(330,268)--(6,905)82,451(66,847)15,604Other------(120)(120)Balance as at December 31, 2010(1)$1,089,576$1,577,507$66,131$6,542$(185,217)$2,554,539$-$2,554,539Comprehensive income-$348,171--20,433368,604-368,604Equity settled share-based compensation plans204-6211,985-2,810-2,810Dividends-(13,873)---(13,873)-(13,873)Issuance of share capital13502,168----502,168-502,168Balance as at December 31, 2011$1,591,948$1,911,805$66,752$8,527$(164,784)$3,414,248$-$3,414,248(1) Refer to note 6 for effects of adoption of IFRS (See accompanying notes)INMET MINING CORPORATIONConsolidated statements of earnings(unaudited)Three Months Ended December 31Year Ended December 31(thousands of Canadian dollars except per share amounts)Note reference20112010(1)20112010(1)Gross sales$241,059$230,269$979,045$778,556Smelter processing charges and freight(28,228)(35,733)(130,726)(138,464)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(93,138)(82,967)(327,076)(253,859)Depreciation(27,716)(18,882)(108,726)(55,988)Earnings from operations91,97792,687412,517330,245Corporate development and exploration(6,541)(5,434)(29,202)(13,495)General and administration(7,734)(4,758)(34,401)(20,364)Investment and other income16(4,011)50,62230,72558,344Stand-by charges---(6,753)Finance costs17(2,390)(4,294)(9,484)(13,176)Income before taxation71,301128,823370,155334,801Income tax expense18(23,229)(31,960)(105,423)(69,087)Income from continuing operations48,072$96,863$264,732$265,714Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)12-47,99383,439124,755Net income48,072$144,856$348,171$390,469Net income attributable to:Inmet equity holders48,072$146,932$348,171$391,876Non-controlling interest-(2,076)-(1,407)48,072$144,856$348,171$390,469Earnings per common share19Income from continuing operationsBasic$0.69$1.73$3.99$4.74Diluted$0.69$1.73$3.98$4.73Income from discontinued operationBasic$-$0.84$1.26$2.21Diluted$-$0.84$1.25$2.21Net incomeBasic$0.69$2.57$5.25$6.95Diluted$0.69$2.57$5.23$6.94(1) Refer to note 6 for effects of adoption of IFRS(See accompanying notes)INMET MINING CORPORATIONSegmented statements of earnings(unaudited)2011 For the year ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Gross sales$-$353,706$356,918$268,421$-$-$979,045Smelter processing charges and freight-(71,704)(1,227)(57,795)--(130,726)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(16,722)(100,267)(151,907)(58,180)--(327,076)Depreciation-(22,037)(77,392)(9,297)--(108,726)Earnings from operations(16,722)159,698126,392143,149--412,517Corporate development and exploration(21,267)(1,665)(449)(3,592)(2,229)-(29,202)General and administration(34,401)-----(34,401)Investment and other income20,7337,7681,74146221-30,725Finance costs(3,843)(589)(4,159)(893)--(9,484)Income tax expense2,452(52,620)(23,536)(31,719)--(105,423)Net income from continuing operations$(53,048)$112,592$99,989$107,407$(2,208)$-$264,732Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)-----83,43983,439Net income (loss)$(53,048)$112,592$99,989$107,407$(2,208)$83,439$348,1712010 For the year ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Gross sales$73,826$333,611$128,643$242,476$-$-$778,556Smelter processing charges and freight(4,526)(75,268)(298)(58,372)--(138,464)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(48,643)(89,262)(60,388)(55,566)--(253,859)Depreciation(4,062)(20,577)(23,068)(8,281)--(55,988)Earnings from operations16,595148,50444,889120,257--330,245Corporate development and exploration(8,799)(700)-(3,996)--(13,495)General and administration(20,364)-----(20,364)Investment and other income58,957(190)(423)---58,344Stand-by charges--(6,753)---(6,753)Finance costs(3,836)(590)(8,042)(708)--(13,176)Income tax expense(8,300)(35,885)4,094(28,996)--(69,087)Net income from continuing operations$34,253$111,139$33,765$86,557$-$-$265,714Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)-----124,755124,755Net income$34,253$111,139$33,765$86,557$-$124,755$390,469INMET MINING CORPORATIONSegmented statements of earnings(unaudited)2011 For the three months ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Gross sales$-$79,656$100,941$60,462$-$-$241,059Smelter processing charges and freight-(14,845)(363)(13,020)--(28,228)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)$(16,722)(23,436)(39,111)(13,869)--(93,138)Depreciation-(5,568)(19,757)(2,391)--(27,716)Earnings from operations(16,722)35,80741,71031,182--91,977Corporate development and exploration(4,613)(389)(443)(1,096)--(6,541)General and administration(7,734)-----(7,734)Investment and other income(5,726)496939161119-(4,011)Finance costs(972)(153)(1,042)(223)--(2,390)Income tax expense1,717(9,754)(8,362)(6,830)--(23,229)Net income from continuing operations$(34,050)$26,007$32,802$23,194$119$-$48,072Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)-------Net income (loss)$(34,050)$26,007$32,802$23,194$119$-$48,0722010 For the three months ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Gross sales$1,756$79,944$66,794$81,775$-$-$230,269Smelter processing charges and freight-(16,899)(271)(18,563)--(35,733)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(14,799)(22,090)(30,499)(15,579)--(82,967)Depreciation(28)(4,145)(12,516)(2,193)--(18,882)Earnings from operations(13,071)36,81023,50845,440--92,687Corporate development and exploration(4,078)(249)-(1,107)--(5,434)General and administration(4,758)-----(4,758)Investment and other income52,602(1,088)(892)---50,622Finance costs(974)(145)(2,996)(179)--(4,294)Income tax expense(6,904)(12,863)20(12,213)--(31,960)Net income from continuing operations$22,817$22,465$19,640$31,941$-$-$96,863Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)-----47,99347,993Net income$22,817$22,465$19,640$31,941$-$47,993$144,856INMET MINING CORPORATIONConsolidated statements of comprehensive income (unaudited)Three Months Ended December 31Year Ended December 31(thousands of Canadian dollars)Note reference20112010(1)20112010(1)Net income$48,072$144,856$348,171$390,469Other comprehensive income for the period:Continuing operationsChanges in fair value of investments(671)7,855(3,669)21,168Currency translation adjustments(110,620)(74,984)4,158(168,390)Reclassifications to net income of gains and losses realized on:Gain on sale of investments-(50,280)-(50,280)Other3,553-3,553-Income tax recovery related to investments - other comprehensive income-6,172164,866(107,738)(111,237)4,058(192,636)Other comprehensive income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)-(7,118)16,375(11,674)Comprehensive income$(59,666)$26,501$368,604$186,159Comprehensive income attributable to:Inmet equity holders$(59,666)$31,093$368,604$194,471Non-controlling interests-(4,592)-(8,312)$(59,666)$26,501$368,604$186,159(1) Refer to note 6 for effects of adoption of IFRS(See accompanying notes)INMET MINING CORPORATIONConsolidated statements of cash flows(unaudited)Three Months Ended December 31Year Ended December 31(thousands of Canadian dollars)Note reference20112010(1)20112010(1)Cash provided by (used in) operating activities(2)Net income from continuing operations$48,072$96,863$264,732$265,714Add (deduct) items not affecting cash:Depreciation27,71618,882108,72655,988Deferred income taxes9,5376,68826,342(2,770)Accretion expense on provisions and capital leases1,9161,7737,6366,283Increase in asset retirement obligations at closed sites16,72214,29516,72214,295Foreign exchange loss (gain)6,230181(21,053)(652)Gain on disposition of equity securities-(50,280)-(50,280)Other10,2542,7437,6609,110Settlement of asset retirement obligations12(4,347)(3,621)(10,854)(9,719)Net change in non-cash working capital20(43,003)2,9914,943(33,051)73,09790,515404,854254,918Cash provided by (used in) investing activitiesPurchase of property, plant and equipment(58,976)(58,862)(208,541)(127,619)Acquisition of held to maturity investments(2,191)-(301,599)(295,846)Maturing of held to maturity investments16,12526,09768,69226,097Acquisition of non-controlling interest in Las Cruces-(150,600)-(150,600)Funding received under Cobre Panama option agreement-4,06512,71414,427Sale of equity securities-61,827-61,827Sale (purchase) of short-term investments, net82,684(7,296)(259,897)19,700Other(3,853)(494)(3,875)5,00833,789(125,263)(692,506)(447,006)Cash provided by (used in) financing activitiesIssuance of common shares13--502,168-Dividends on common shares(6,940)(5,600)(13,873)(11,210)Financial assurance (payments) receipts(209)11,498(2,575)11,498Other(540)(67)(2,859)994(7,689)5,831482,8611,282Foreign exchange on cash held in foreign currencies(23,545)(11,241)(5,375)(27,469)Cash provided by discontinued operation12-28,384306,982123,340Reclassification of our share of Ok Tedi cash to assets held for sale-(92,853)-(92,853)Increase (decrease) in cash:75,652(104,627)496,816(187,788)Cash:Beginning of period740,293423,756319,129506,917End of period$815,945$319,129$815,945$319,129Short term investments266,9487,296266,9487,296Cash and short-term investments$1,082,893$326,425$1,082,893$326,425(1) Refer to note 6 for effects of adoption of IFRS(See accompanying notes)(2)Supplementary cash flow information:Cash interest paid$-$-$1,155$1,146Cash taxes paid$29,992$12,429$95,127$75,548INMET MINING CORPORATIONSegmented statements of cash flows(unaudited)2011 For the year ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Cash provided by (used in) operating activitiesBefore net change in non-cash working capital$(57,133)$136,402$205,154$117,696$(2,208)$-$399,911Net change in non-cash working capital(4,767)20,404(10,511)(183)--4,943(61,900)156,806194,643117,513(2,208)-404,854Cash provided by (used in) investing activitiesPurchase of property, plant and equipment(1,090)(13,125)(53,641)(7,255)(133,430)-(208,541)Acquisition of held to maturity investments(285,916)(15,683)----(301,599)Maturity of held-to-maturity investments68,692-----68,692Funding received under Cobre Panama option agreement----12,714-12,714Sale (purchase) of short-term investments(267,174)-7,277---(259,897)Other(3,875)-----(3,875)(489,363)(28,808)(46,364)(7,255)(120,716)-(692,506)Cash provided by (used in) financing activities488,059-(5,198)---482,861Foreign exchange on cash held in foreign currencies-663(3,905)(2,694)561-(5,375)Cash provided by discontinued operation-----306,982306,982Intergroup funding (distributions)477,866(98,821)(55,618)(156,997)140,552(306,982)-Increase (decrease) in cash414,66229,84083,558(49,433)18,189(306,982)496,816Cash:Beginning of year53,184107,75052,57097,0568,569-319,129End of period467,846137,590136,12847,62326,758(306,982)815,945Short term investments266,948-----266,948Cash and short-term investments$734,794$137,590$136,128$47,623$26,758$-$1,082,8932010 For the year ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Cash provided by (used in) operating activitiesBefore net change in non-cash working capital$(4,320)$132,739$61,157$98,393$-$-$287,969Net change in non-cash working capital2,815(15,901)(1,678)(18,287)--(33,051)(1,505)116,83859,47980,106--254,918Cash provided by (used in) investing activitiesPurchase of property, plant and equipment(222)(14,911)(23,978)(3,974)(84,534)-(127,619)Acquisition of held to maturity investments(228,500)(67,346)----(295,846)Maturing of held to maturity investments26,097-----26,097Acquisition of non-controlling Interest in Las Cruces(150,600)-----(150,600)Funding received under Cobre Panama option agreement----14,427-14,427Sale (net) of equity investments61,827-----61,827Sale (purchase) of short-term investments26,996-(7,296)---19,700Other5,008-----5,008(259,394)(82,257)(31,274)(3,974)(70,107)-(447,006)Cash provided by (used in) financing activities(11,919)-13,201---1,282Foreign exchange on cash held in foreign currencies-(9,954)(2,768)(14,388)(359)-(27,469)Cash provided by discontinued operation-----123,340123,340Reclassification of our share of Ok Tedi cash to assets held for sale-----(92,853)(92,853)Intergroup funding (distributions)101,428(75,508)3,893(31,002)68,307(67,118)-Increase (decrease) in cash(171,390)(50,881)42,53130,742(2,159)(36,631)(187,788)Cash:Beginning of year224,574158,63110,03966,31410,72836,631506,917End of period53,184107,75052,57097,0568,569-319,129Short term investments--7,296---7,296Cash and short-term investments$53,184$107,750$59,866$97,056$8,569$-$326,425INMET MINING CORPORATIONSegmented statements of cash flows(unaudited)2011 For the three months ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS -OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Cash provided by (used in) operating activitiesBefore net change in non-cash working capital$(6,542)$34,760$62,016$25,747$119$-$116,100Net change in non-cash working capital1,443(26,312)(16,483)(1,651)--(43,003)(5,099)8,44845,53324,096119-73,097Cash provided by (used in) investing activitiesPurchase of property, plant and equipment(357)(3,549)(9,984)(1,977)(43,109)-(58,976)Acquisition of held-to-maturity investments(1,866)(325)----(2,191)Maturing of held-to-maturity investments16,125-----16,125Funding received under Cobre Panama option agreement-------Sale (purchase) of short-term investments82,685-(1)---82,684Other(2,882)(971)----(3,853)93,705(4,845)(9,985)(1,977)(43,109)-33,789Cash provided by (used in) financing activities(7,062)-(627)---(7,689)Foreign exchange on cash held in foreign currencies-(5,600)(8,951)(7,462)(1,532)-(23,545)Intergroup funding (distributions)51,213(56)(15,158)(78,407)42,408-Increase (decrease) in cash132,757(2,053)10,812(63,750)(2,114)-75,652Cash:Beginning of year335,089139,643125,316111,37328,872-740,293End of period467,846137,590136,12847,62326,758-815,945Short term investments266,948-----266,948Cash and short-term investments$734,794$137,590$136,128$47,623$26,758$-$1,082,8932010 For the three months ended December 31CORPORATE & OTHERÇAYELILAS CRUCESPYHÄSALMICOBRE PANAMADISCONTINUED OPERATIONS - OK TEDITOTAL(thousands of Canadian dollars)(Turkey)(Spain)(Finland)(Panama)(Papua New Guinea)Cash provided by (used in) operating activitiesBefore net change in non-cash working capital$(11,744)$26,794$35,662$36,812$-$-$87,524Net change in non-cash working capital(659)15,584(1,736)(10,198)--2,991(12,403)42,37833,92626,614--90,515Cash provided by (used in) investing activitiesPurchase of property, plant and equipment(90)(6,682)(31,812)(710)(19,568)-(58,862)Maturing of held to maturity investments26,097-----26,097Repurchase of long term debt(150,600)-----(150,600)Funding received under Cobre Panama option agreement----4,065-4,065Sale (purchase) of equity securities61,827-----61,827Sale of short-term investments--(7,296)---(7,296)Other(494)-----(494)(63,260)(6,682)(39,108)(710)(15,503)-(125,263)Cash provided by (used in) financing activities(5,810)-11,641---5,831Foreign exchange on cash held in foreign currencies-(3,398)(2,812)(4,660)(371)-(11,241)Cash provided by discontinued operation-----28,38428,384Reclassification of our share of Ok Tedi cash toassets held for sale-----(92,853)(92,853)Intergroup funding (distributions)(12,324)373(1,389)(3,018)16,722(364)-Increase (decrease) in cash(93,797)32,6712,25818,226848(64,833)(104,627)Cash:Beginning of year146,98175,07950,31278,8307,72164,833423,756End of period53,184107,75052,57097,0568,569-319,129Short term investments--7,296---7,296Cash and short-term investments$53,184$107,750$59,866$97,056$8,569$-$326,425Notes to the consolidated financial statements1. Corporate information Inmet Mining Corporation is a publicly traded corporation listed on the Toronto stock exchange. Our registered and head office is 330 Bay Street, Suite 1000, Toronto Canada. Our principal activities are the exploration, development and mining of base metals.2. Basis of presentation and statement of complianceInternational Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) require us to make an explicit and unreserved statement that our financial statements are in compliance with IFRS. We have made this statement when we issued our 2011 annual financial statements. These condensed interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and using the accounting policies we expect to adopt in our consolidated financial statements for the year ending December 31, 2011. This is the first year we have prepared our financial statements in accordance with IFRS. See note 6, First time adoption of IFRS, for information about our transition from Canadian GAAP. You should read our interim statements in conjunction with our annual statements which you can find in our 2011 Annual Report.We have prepared the consolidated financial statements under the historical cost convention, modified by the revaluation of certain financial instruments we have measured in accordance with IFRS. The financial statements are in Canadian dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest thousand except where otherwise indicated. These statements have been approved by Inmet's board of directors and have been reviewed by our external auditors. Our segmented statements reflect the management structure of our company in which each operation retains its own management team and compiles its own financial information, following the accounting policies outlined here.Çayeli - a mine in Turkey that produces copper and zinc concentrates. Çayeli is a wholly-owned subsidiary. Las Cruces - a high grade copper deposit in Spain that produces cathode copper. Las Cruces is a wholly-owned subsidiary. Pyhäsalmi - a mine in Finland that produces copper and zinc concentrates. Pyhäsalmi is a wholly-owned subsidiary. Cobre Panama - a copper, gold and molybdenum deposit currently under development in Panama. We have a 100 percent interest in Cobre Panama. Korea Panama Mining Corporation owns an option to acquire a 20 percent interest in Cobre Panama (note 22). Corporate and other - our head office and closed properties. As a result of the closure of Troilus, we no longer consider it to be a separate reportable operating segment and included its results in Corporate and other retroactively. 3. Summary of significant accounting policiesWe have applied the accounting policies set out below consistently for all periods presented in these consolidated financial statements and in preparing the opening IFRS statement of financial position at January 1, 2010 for the purposes of our transition to IFRSs, unless otherwise indicated.Basis of consolidation Entities we controlWe have control of an entity when we have the right to govern its operating and financial policies (usually when we have more than 50 percent voting power through ownership or agreements), unless a non-controlling interest is able to prevent us from exercising control. We consolidate the results of entities we control and eliminate all intercompany balances and transactions. When we acquire a new entity, we consolidate from the day that control passes to us. We consolidate those we sell until the day control passes to the acquirer. Interests in jointly controlled entitiesWe jointly control an entity when we hold a long-term interest in it, and share joint control over its operating and financial decisions with one or more other parties under a contractual arrangement. We proportionately consolidate our share of any entity we jointly control, combining its line-by-line results with similar line items in our financial statements. Foreign exchange Functional and presentation currencyInmet Mining's functional currency is the Canadian dollar. We report our consolidated financial statements in Canadian dollars.Our entities measure the items in their financial statements in their functional currency (the currency of the primary economic environment they operate in). Çayeli and Cobre Panama use the US dollar and Pyhäsalmi and Las Cruces use the euro.Foreign currency transactionsMonetary items denominated in foreign currencies are translated into each entity's functional currency at the rate of exchange on the balance sheet date, and gains and losses on translation are recognized in the statement of earnings for the year. We recognize all other transactions in foreign currencies at the exchange rate at the time of the transaction.Financial statements of foreign operationsFor operations that have a functional currency other than the Canadian dollar, we translate the statement of earnings and balance sheet as follows:assets and liabilities: translated at the closing rate at the end of the year. revenues and expenses: translated for each statement of earnings at rates approximating the exchange rates at the time of the transactions. resulting differences: recognized as a separate component of accumulated other comprehensive income. We also recognize exchange differences relating to long-term intercompany loan balances with foreign operations that form part of the net investment in the foreign operation in this separate component of accumulated other comprehensive income.When we sell all or part of a foreign operation, or repay its share capital or intercompany debt considered part of the net investment, we recognize exchange differences arising from the translation of the net investment in the statement of earnings. Business combinationsWhen we acquire a subsidiary, we account for it using the purchase method. The cost of the business combination is the fair value at the date of exchange of: the assets we gave the liabilities we incurred or assumed, and the equity instruments we issued in exchange for control. We allocate total consideration paid to the identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities (identifiable net assets) we acquired, at their fair value on the date of the acquisition, including mineral reserves and resources that can be reliably valued.We expense transaction costs related to an acquisition as incurred. If the fair value of our share of the identifiable net assets acquired is greater than the fair value of the consideration paid, we recognize the difference in the statement of earnings on the acquisition date. Non controlling interest is the portion of an entity that we do not own (the profit or loss and net assets we are not entitled to). We record non controlling interests in equity, separate from our shareholders' equity. RevenueGross sales include the sale of all concentrate, cathode copper and gold doré. It does not include smelter processing charges and freight, which are presented as a separate line item in the statement of earnings.We recognize revenue when all significant risks and rewards of ownership of our products have been transferred to the customer - usually when the customer takes on the insurance risk and the goods have been delivered to the shipping agent. Most of our sales contracts set the sales price at the commodity's market price on a specified future date. To calculate our revenue from the sale of our products, we use the forward price of the commodity for the day we expect the contract to settle. Variations between the price we record on the date of initial revenue recognition and the final price we receive due to changes in market prices represents an embedded derivative in our sales contracts. We adjust our revenue every period for any change in the value of the contract using the period end forward price for the day the contract is expected to settle. When it settles, we record the difference between the forward price and the final price we receive in revenue. We recognize interest income in investment and other income, based on the principal outstanding and the effective interest rate.We recognize dividends and royalties in investment and other income when we have established the right to receive payment.Inventories Inventories include:stockpiled ore, materials and supplies: ore, goods and supplies that will be consumed directly or indirectly in the production process work in process: inventory in an intermediate state that has not yet passed through all stages of the production process finished goods: concentrate, cathode copper and gold doré that are ready for sale. We measure inventory at the lower of cost or net realizable value, as follows: cost: a weighted average that includes all costs directly related to bringing the inventory to its current location and condition, such as mining and milling costs and an allocation of production overheads and depreciation based on normal capacity net realizable value: the estimated selling price less any additional costs we expect to incur for completion and sale of the related inventory. We classify inventories of stockpiled ore that we do not expect to process in the next year as other assets.Property, plant and equipment On initial acquisition, we recognize property, plant and equipment at cost. Cost includes the purchase price, costs that can be directly attributed to acquiring it, and the cost required to bring the asset to the location and the condition necessary to operate in the way we intended it to. In subsequent periods, we recognize it at cost less accumulated depreciation and any impairment in value. We depreciate the cost, less estimated residual values of property, plant and equipment, as follows: property: depreciated in proportion to the depletion of proven and probable reserves on a unit of production basis. plant and equipment: depreciated using a straight-line method based on estimated useful life. The expected useful lives of plant and equipment range from 5 to 15 years, but do not exceed the life of mine. When different parts (or components) of an asset are significant and have different useful lives, we depreciate the individual components separately, considering both a component's physical life, and the present estimated mineral reserves at the mine where the component is located. We review estimates in remaining useful lives and residual values at least annually and account for any changes prospectively.When we carry out a major maintenance refit, we may replace or overhaul assets or parts of assets. When we replace an asset or a component that we have been depreciating separately, we capitalize these costs if this extends its useful life and it is probable that this will result in future economic benefits to the operation. In addition, we write off the asset or component that has been replaced. If we replace part of an asset that was not considered a component, we use the replacement value to estimate the carrying amount of the replaced asset and immediately write that off. We expense all other regular maintenance costs as incurred. Exploration and evaluation expenditures We expense the costs of exploration and evaluation as incurred, except for the following:in areas currently under development where we can reasonably expect to convert existing mineral resources into mineral reserves or add additional mineral resources with further drilling and evaluations the cost to acquire an early stage entity conducting primarily exploration and evaluation activities. In the first two instances, we capitalize costs as development expenditures. In the third instance, we capitalize costs as exploration and evaluation assets.Development expenditures We capitalize the costs of acquiring and developing mineral reserves and resources on the balance sheet as we incur them. These costs include accessing the ore body, designing and constructing the production infrastructure, interest and financing relating to construction, and costs that can be directly attributed to bringing the assets to the condition necessary for their intended use. This includes costs during the commissioning period when required before the asset can operate at normal levels. Development expenditures are not depreciated. When production begins, we reclassify these costs to the appropriate category of property, plant and equipment and depreciate them according to our accounting policy. Capitalized stripping In open pit mining operations, we remove overburden and other waste in order to access the ore body (stripping). During development, we capitalize the cost of stripping as part of the cost of mine development and reclassify it to property when production begins. During the production phase, we capitalize these costs to property when stripping activity gives us access to reserves that would not otherwise have been accessible, and that we expect will be mined in the future. We amortize production phase stripping costs over the reserves that are directly affected by the stripping activity on a units-of-production basis.LeasingWe determine whether an arrangement is, or contains, a lease based on the substance of the arrangement, considering whether the arrangement is dependent on the use of a specific asset or whether the arrangement conveys a right to use the asset. We classify a lease as financial when we carry substantially all of the risks and rewards of owning the asset. We capitalize assets under financial leases at either the fair value of the leased asset or the present value of the minimum lease payments over the lease term using the interest rate in the lease agreement - whichever is lower. We determine these amounts at the inception of the lease and depreciate the corresponding asset over its estimated useful life or the lease term - whichever is shorter. We recognize a corresponding amount representing our future obligation for finance leases in Other liabilities in the balance sheet, and recognize the associated accretion expense over time in finance costs in the statement of earnings. We classify a lease as operating when we do not have substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership. We recognize rentals payable under operating leases in the statement of earnings on a straight line basis over the term of the lease.Impairment of assets At each reporting date, we look for indications of impairment of our non-current assets. If there are indicators of impairment, we carry out a formal test to see whether the asset's carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. An asset's recoverable amount is its fair value less costs to sell or its value-in-use - whichever is higher. Fair value less costs to sell is the amount we would receive from the sale of the asset in an arm's-length transaction between knowledgeable and willing parties. For our mining assets, we generally use the present value of future cash flows we expect from their continued use, including any expansion prospects, and from their eventual disposal. When assessing cash flows and discounting them to present value, we use assumptions that we believe an arm's length party would consider appropriate. We calculate the value-in-use of an asset by using the present value of cash flows we expect from its continued use in its present form, and from its disposal, without taking into account any future development. Value-in-use is likely to be different from fair value because we use different assumptions. If the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its recoverable amount, we recognize an impairment loss in the statement of earnings to reflect the lower amount of the asset. We recognize impairment losses related to continuing operations in the statement of earnings in the expense category that relates to the asset's function.We carry out these reviews for each asset, unless the asset does not generate cash flows on its own. In this case, we will carry out the review at the cash-generating unit level. Cash generating units are the smallest identifiable group of assets and liabilities that generate cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets. This generally results in an evaluation of assets at the mine entity level.We reverse an impairment loss in the statement of earnings if the estimates we used to calculate the recoverable amount have changed since we recognized the impairment. We increase the carrying amount to the recoverable amount, net of the depreciation or amortization that would have arisen if we had not recognized the original impairment loss. After a reversal, we recognize depreciation over the asset's remaining useful life based on its revised carrying amount, less any residual value.Government subsidies We recognize government subsidies when there is reasonable assurance we will receive the subsidy and will comply with all of the associated conditions. We credit government subsidies related to a capital expenditure against the carrying amount of the related asset, and amortize the subsidy over the expected useful life of the asset. We credit subsidies that are not associated with an asset to income, to match them with the expenses they relate to.Provisions for asset retirement obligationsOur mines, closed properties and joint ventures are subject to environmental laws and regulations in Canada and the other countries we operate in. Mining companies are legally obligated to rehabilitate land and other property that has been damaged or contaminated in the course of their business activities. While rehabilitation activities usually happen after the site has been closed, companies are required to estimate reclamation costs from both operating sites and closed sites. We incur obligations to restore and rehabilitate land and the environment as we carry out the regular construction and operation of our mines. Costs can include, among other things, the dismantling and demolition of infrastructure, removal of residual materials and remediation of disturbed areas. We recognize a provision for these costs as the related disturbances occur, using our best estimate of future costs based on information available at the balance sheet date, including an adjustment for risk when there is significant variability in possible outcomes. We discount the provision using a current inflation adjusted pre-tax risk free interest rate and include the accretion of the discounted amount over time in finance costs in the statement of earnings.When we recognize a provision, we record a corresponding increase in the carrying amount of the related asset (where we can identify one) and recognize depreciation following our accounting policies for property, plant and equipment. We review these provisions annually for changes to our obligations, legislation or discount rates that affect our cost estimates or lives of operations. We adjust the provision and the cost of the related asset (where we can identify one) when there is a change in the estimated cash flows or discount rate, and depreciate the adjusted cost of the asset prospectively. When we do not identify an asset, such as at our closed sites, we record a provision or a change in provision in cost of sales.See note 12 for more information on our asset retirement obligations.Other provisionsWe recognize a provision when we have a legal or constructive obligation because of past events, and it is probable that, to settle the obligation, we will be required to make a payment that we can reliably estimate. If its effect is material, we discount the provision to net present value using a pre-tax risk free interest rate. We recognize the accretion of discounted provisions over the time of the obligation in finance costs in the statement of earnings.Income taxesWe calculate current income tax expense for each of our taxable entities based on the local taxable income at the local statutory tax rate enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet date, and include adjustments to income taxes payable or recoverable for previous periods. We calculate deferred tax assets and liabilities based on temporary differences between the carrying amounts in our balance sheet and their tax bases, using income tax rates we expect to be in effect when the temporary differences are likely to be settled. We present all deferred taxes as non-current assets and liabilities on the balance sheet. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset if there is a legally enforceable right to offset current tax liabilities and assets, and they relate to income taxes levied by the same tax authority on the same taxable entity, or on different tax entities, but they intend to settle current tax liabilities and assets on a net basis or their tax assets and liabilities will be realized simultaneously.We only recognize deferred tax assets when it is probable that we will have enough taxable income in the future to recover them. We include the effects of changes in tax rates in income when the change is enacted or substantively enacted. We recognize deferred tax assets or liabilities for all temporary differences, except for: A deferred tax liability on the initial recognition of goodwill; A deferred tax asset or liability arising from the initial recognition of an asset or liability in a transaction which is not a business combination and at the time of the transaction affects neither accounting profit or loss nor taxable profit or loss; and A deferred tax liability with respect to investments in subsidiaries, branches, associates and interests in joint ventures, when we can control the timing of the reversal of the temporary difference and that it is probable that the temporary difference will not reverse in the foreseeable future. We review the carrying amount of deferred income tax assets at each balance sheet date and adjust it if:an asset not previously recognized meets the criteria for recognition our estimate of future taxable income available to recover them changes. We recognize current and deferred tax that relates to equity items in equity, and not in the statement of earnings. Assets held for sale and discontinued operationsAssets held for saleWe classify assets and disposal groups as held for sale if we will recover their carrying amounts through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. This condition is regarded as met only when the sale is highly probable and the assets or disposal groups are available for immediate sale in their present condition. We must be committed to the sale, which should be expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale within one year of the date of classification.We carry assets (or disposal groups) held for sale at the lower of the carrying amount before being classified as held for sale, and the fair value less costs to sell. We present the assets and liabilities of a disposal group classified as held for sale separately as one line in the assets and liabilities sections on the statement of financial position.Discontinued operationsA discontinued operation is a component of an entity that has been disposed of or classified as held for sale, with operations and cash flows that are clearly distinguished both operationally and for financial reporting purposes from the rest of the entity. To be classified as a discontinued operation, an operation must:represent a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations be part of a single coordinated plan to dispose of a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations, or be a subsidiary acquired only for resale. When the operation is discontinued at the balance sheet date, the results are presented in one line on the statement of earnings, and prior period results are represented as discontinued.See note 10 for a breakdown of our results from discontinued operations.Cash and short-term investmentsCash includes cash and money market instruments that mature in 90 days or less from the date of acquisition. Short-term investments mature in 91 days to a year.In the consolidated statements of cash flows, we disclose: short-term investments we buy with cash during the year as cash used in investing activities short-term investments we sell to generate cash as a source of cash from investing activities See note 7 for a breakdown of our cash and short-term investments.Restricted cash Restricted cash includes cash that has been pledged for other uses, such as reclamation, and is not available for immediate disbursement. See note 8 for a breakdown of our restricted cash.Financial instruments Financial instruments include cash, as well as any contract that gives rise to a financial asset to one party and a financial liability or equity instrument to another party. We classify financial instruments at their initial recognition. We initially recognize financial instruments at their fair value.Fair value is the value a financial instrument can be closed out or sold at, in a transaction with a willing and knowledgeable counterparty. It is usually the instrument's quoted market price. If a quoted market price is not available, we determine fair value with models using market-based or independent information and assumptions.Cash and short-term investments, accounts receivable from metal sales, restricted cash and accounts payable and accrued liabilities These financial instruments have been designated as fair value through profit and loss and are recorded at fair value. We record any changes in their fair value in net income. We record interest and dividends earned on cash, short-term investments and restricted cash in Investment and other income. For cash, we calculate fair value using published price quotations in an active market where there is one. Otherwise fair value represents cost plus accrued interest, which is reasonable given its short-term nature. We record accounts receivable related to metal sales at fair value based on forward market metal prices on the date of the balance sheet (see our Revenue policy above). We record accounts payable and accrued liabilities at amortized cost, which approximates fair value because of their short-term nature. Investments Our investments in equity securities are designated as available-for-sale and recorded at fair value. We calculate fair value using the bid price of the investment as quoted in an active market. We record changes in the fair value of our investments in Other comprehensive income. The change in fair value of an investment in an equity security appears in Investment and other income only when it is sold or impaired.Our investments in long-term government and corporate bonds are designated as held to maturity. We initially recognize these investments at fair value and subsequently at amortized cost with the related interest income recorded in Investment and other income. We only designate investments as held to maturity when we intend, and have the ability, to hold them to maturity.We capitalize transaction costs related to investments we make and include these in the investment's initial carrying value.Loans and receivables All non-metal receivables are designated as loans and receivables. We initially measure these assets at fair value. In subsequent periods, we measure them at amortized cost using the effective interest rate method. Long-term debtOur long-term debt is designated as other liabilities and is accounted for at amortized cost. We record interest expense on long-term debt in finance costs in the statement of earnings unless it relates specifically to a development project, and has been accounted for using our accounting policy for borrowing costs. Derecognition of financial instrumentsWe will derecognize a financial asset when:our rights to receive cash flows from the asset have expired our right to receive cash flows has been retained, but we have assumed an obligation to pay them in full to a third party without material delay, or our right to receive cash flows has been transferred, together with substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership. We derecognize financial liabilities when the associated obligation is discharged, cancelled or has expired.Impairment of financial assetsWe review our investments for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on both quantitative and qualitative criteria, including the extent that cost exceeds market value, the length of a market decline and the financial health of the issuer. For loans and receivables and our investments in long-term bonds, we measure the amount of the loss as the difference between the asset's carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset's original effective interest rate. We reduce the carrying amount of the asset and recognize the amount of the loss in the income statement in investment and other income. If, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognized, we reverse the previously recognized impairment loss. We recognize any subsequent reversal of an impairment loss in the income statement, to the extent that the carrying value of the asset does not exceed its amortized cost at the reversal date.If our investments in equity securities are impaired, we transfer the difference between its cost and its current fair value, less any impairment loss previously recognized in the income statement, from accumulated other comprehensive income to the income statement in investment and other income.Embedded derivativesWhen we enter into a contract, we determine whether it contains an embedded derivative. We separate an embedded derivative from its host contract if the derivative is not measured at fair value through profit and loss, and when its economic characteristics and risks are not closely related to the host contract. In these circumstances, we recognize the embedded derivative according to our accounting policy for derivatives.Derivatives and hedgingWe designate non-financial derivative contracts as held-for-trading and record them at fair value on the balance sheet. We include mark-to-market adjustments on these instruments in net income, unless the instruments are designated as part of a hedge relationship.We record derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value. On the date we enter into a derivative, we designate it as a hedging instrument or a non-hedge derivative. A hedging instrument is designated in either: a fair value hedge relationship with a recognized asset or liability, or a cash flow hedge relationship with either a forecasted transaction, the variable future cash flows arising from a recognized asset or liability, or a foreign currency risk in an unrecognized firm commitment. When we enter into a hedging contract, we formally document the relationship between the hedging instrument and the items it hedges, and the related risk-management strategy. This documentation: links the hedging instrument to a specific asset or liability, specific forecasted transaction, firm commitment or variable future cash flows defines how we assess retrospective and prospective hedge effectiveness. At the end of every quarter, we determine whether we expect a hedging instrument to be highly effective in offsetting risk in the future. If we do not expect it to be highly effective, we stop hedge accounting prospectively, and keep accumulated gains or losses in other comprehensive income until the hedged item affects earnings. We also stop hedge accounting prospectively if: a derivative is settled it is no longer highly probable that a forecasted transaction will occur we de-designate a hedging relationship. If we conclude that it is probable that a forecasted transaction will not happen within the documented time frame, we immediately transfer all gains and losses accumulated in other comprehensive income to earnings. When hedge accounting stops, we reclassify the derivative as a non-hedge derivative prospectively. We classify cash flows from a derivative in the same category as the cash flows from the item it hedges. We record cash flows from non-hedge derivatives as operating cash flows. We record derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value and record changes in the fair value of derivatives at the end of every period: fair value hedges: we record the change in the fair value of the derivative and the item it hedges in earnings cash flow hedges: we record the change in the fair value of the derivative in other comprehensive income until earnings are affected by the item it hedges, except for any hedge ineffectiveness which we immediately record in earnings non-hedge derivatives: we record the change in the fair value of the derivative in investment and other income. Borrowing costsWhen we can attribute borrowing costs directly to the acquisition, construction or production of an asset that takes a substantial period of time to get ready for its intended use, we capitalize these costs as part of the asset's carrying value and amortize them over its useful life. Otherwise, we capitalize borrowing costs related to the establishment of a loan facility as long-term debt, and amortize them over the life of the loan facility. We recognize other borrowing costs as an expense when we incur them. Share capitalWhen we issue common shares, we recognize them in share capital at the net proceeds received (the fair value of the consideration we received, less costs we incurred to issue the shares). Share-based compensation plans We have a number of equity-settled and cash settled share-based compensation plans for senior management under which we issue either Inmet common shares or make cash payments based on the value of Inmet common shares. We calculate the cumulative expense at each balance sheet date before vesting, basing it on the vesting period remaining and our best estimate of the fair value of awards that we ultimately expect to vest, and recognize any change in the statement of earnings in general and administration. Annually, we adjust the estimated forfeiture rate for actual forfeitures in the year. For equity settled awards, we determine the fair value at the grant date and recognize our obligation in equity. For cash-settled awards, we recalculate the fair value at each balance sheet date until the awards are settled and recognize our obligation as a liability. Our share-based compensation plans comprise the following:Stock option plan: Stock options are equity-settled by issuing shares from treasury. We estimate the fair value of stock options at the grant date using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Options vest evenly over a four-year period. Performance share unit (PSU) plan: PSUs are cash-settled and are subject to certain vesting requirements and vest at the end of a three year performance period. Vesting requirements are based on performance criteria established by the board of directors (Board). We re-measure the fair value of PSUs at each balance sheet date using a Monte Carlo pricing model that takes into account expected volatility, expected dividend yield and the risk-free interest rate over the life of the PSUs to generate potential outcomes for share prices, which are used to estimate the probability of the PSUs vesting at the end of the three year performance measurement period. A Monte Carlo pricing model is a technique used to approximate the probability of certain outcomes, called simulations, based on normally distributed random variables and highly subjective assumptions. This model generates potential outcomes for stock prices and allows for the simulation of multiple stocks in tandem resulting in an estimated probability of vesting.Deferred share unit (DSU) program: this program allows Inmet directors to receive director fees in the form of DSUs rather than cash. DSUs are equity-settled by issuing shares from treasury and directors can only redeem their units for Inmet common shares when they retire. DSUs are fully vested when granted. We determine the fair value of DSUs at the grant date based on the closing trading price of an Inmet common share.Long-term incentive plan (LTIP): this plan ties a portion of incentive compensation to the completion of specific development projects as defined under the plan. LTIP units are equity-settled by issuing shares from treasury. The Board uses its discretion to determine the vesting date for an award, but vesting is generally when the development project is determined to be substantially complete and has operated for enough time to be able to assess its ongoing operating parameters. The Board determines the number of units that vest by assessing senior management's performance against the expectations underlying the Board's original decision to develop the project. We calculate the stock based compensation expense using the estimated vesting date for the project associated with an award, and an estimate of senior management's ultimate performance for an award based on performance to date (estimated performance). We determine the fair value of LTIP units at the grant date based on the closing trading price of an Inmet common share.Share award plan (SAP): at the time a share award is made, it is equity-settled by purchasing an equivalent number of Inmet common shares on the open market and we record this amount against contributed surplus. The share awards vest evenly over a period of four years.See note 14 for more information related to our share based compensation plans.Net income per shareWe calculate basic net income per share by dividing net income available to the common shareholders of Inmet Mining by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the year.We calculate diluted net income per share by taking into consideration the dilutive effects of stock options, DSUs and LTIP units. For stock options, we calculate dilution based upon the net number of common shares to be issued assuming in-the-money options are exercised and the proceeds are used to repurchase common shares at the average market price in the period. We also adjust the weighted average number of common shares by the number of DSUs outstanding and the number of LTIP units that are expected to vest. See note 19 for our calculation of basic and diluted net income per share.Employee future benefits We provide a defined contribution retirement benefit to employees in Canada.Employees in the other jurisdictions where we operate either have state pension arrangements or do not receive pension benefits.Certain employees take part in the defined contribution employee benefit plans. Our cost for these plans is the required contributions based on specified percentages of salaries we are required to make. For certain executives, our total contribution to the defined contribution component of the registered plan, including the annual cash payment in lieu of a supplementary pension plan, is equivalent to 9 to 12 percent of their salary and bonus.We expense contributions as they come due.4. Application of critical accounting judgements and estimatesPreparing our consolidated financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires us to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements, and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates and assumptions are based on our experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. We continuously evaluate these estimates, but actual outcomes could be different. The most critical judgements, estimates and assumptions are described below. Purchase price allocationWe account for acquisitions by the purchase method of accounting whereby the purchase price is allocated to the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed based on fair value at the time of the acquisition. The excess purchase price over the fair value of identifiable assets and liabilities acquired is goodwill. The determination of fair value often requires us to make assumptions and estimates about future events. The assumptions and estimates with respect to determining the fair value of property, plant and equipment acquired generally require a high degree of judgement, and include estimates of mineral reserves acquired, future metal prices and discount rates. Changes in any of the assumptions or estimates used in determining the fair value of acquired assets and liabilities could impact the amounts assigned to assets, liabilities and goodwill in the purchase price allocation. Estimated mineral reservesOur mineral reserves are estimates of the amount of ore that can be economically and legally extracted from our mining properties. To calculate reserves, we use estimates and assumptions about a range of geological, technical and economic factors, including quantities, grades, production techniques, recovery rates, production and freight costs, commodity prices and exchange rates. Our reserves for all operations are estimated based on information compiled by or under the supervision of a qualified person as defined under National Instrument 43-101.Changes in our reserve estimates can affect:asset carrying values due to changes in estimated future cash flows and impairment analysis depreciation in the statement of earnings, when depreciation is based on units of production, or when the useful economic life of an asset changes asset retirement obligations where changes in estimated reserves affect expectations about the timing or cost of these activities. Provision for asset retirement obligationsOur closed mines, operations and joint ventures are subject to environmental laws and regulations in Canada, the United States and the other countries in which we operate. Our provision for asset retirement obligations is our best estimate of the present value of the future costs of mine closure, and involves a significant number of technical issues, estimates and assumptions, with many uncertainties, including changes to the relevant legal and regulatory framework, the magnitude of possible contamination and the timing and extent of the cost of required restoration activities. We will record any changes that arise prospectively, as follows:operating mines: we record changes in the balance sheet by adjusting the reclamation asset and provision, which affects both future depreciation and finance costs closed properties: we immediately recognize changes to estimated costs in the statement of earnings as cost of sales. Impairment of assetsIf we believe an asset may be impaired, we calculate its recoverable amount as either its fair value less costs to sell, or its value in use (whichever is higher), following our Impairment of assets accounting policy described in note 3. When following this policy, we make estimates and assumptions about future production and sales volumes, future commodity prices, recoverable mineral reserves, discount rates, foreign exchange rates, future operating and capital costs. We may also make assumptions about our ability to obtain financing for a project or to recover costs by selling an asset. Actual outcomes could be different.Income taxes We operate in a number of countries around the world and are subject to, and pay annual income taxes under the regimes in countries in which we operate. These tax regimes are determined under general corporate income tax laws in those countries. We file all required income tax returns and pay the taxes reasonably determined to be due. The tax laws in many countries can be complex and subject to interpretation. From time to time, there may be disagreement with the taxing authorities over our interpretation of the country's income tax rules. The final outcome of these disputes could be materially different from our estimated tax liabilities.We have significant Canadian tax benefits from capital losses, capital cost allowances and mining resource pools. We only recognize deferred tax assets arising from tax loss carry forwards, capital losses and temporary differences when it is probable that we will have enough taxable income in the future to recover them, therefore this is dependent on the generation of sufficient future taxable income. Our estimates of future taxable income include assumptions about interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and other factors. Our deferred tax asset could be reduced if future taxable income is reduced resulting in a corresponding charge to income tax expense in the statement of earnings. Plant constructionIn the construction of plant and equipment, we capitalize costs that can be directly attributed to bringing the asset into working condition for its intended use, including costs during a commissioning period, before the asset is able to operate at normal levels. We use several criteria to determine when an asset is able to operate at normal levels. These are complex, and depend on each development property's plan and its economic, political and environmental condition. Criteria can include:producing saleable material completing a reasonable period of testing of the plant and equipment in the mine, mill and/or plant achieving certain level of recoveries from the ore mined and processed sustaining ongoing production and reaching a certain level of production. Once these criteria are met, we stop capitalizing the costs related to the commissioning period, and begin to recognize production costs in the statement of earnings. 5. Standards issued but not yet effectiveThe IASB has issued the following new standards and amendments to existing standards. These changes in accounting are not yet effective at December 31, 2011, and could have an impact in future periods: IFRS 9Financial instrumentsIFRS 9 simplifies the current measurement model for financial instruments under IFRS and establishes two measurement categories for financial assets: amortized cost and fair value. Existing IAS 39 categories of loans and receivables, held-to-maturity investments, and available-for-sale financial assets will be eliminated. A financial asset can be measured at amortized cost when: - the objective of the business model is to hold assets in order to collect contractual cash flows, and - the contractual terms give rise, on contractual dates, to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on principal outstanding. All other financial assets are measured at fair value.IFRS 7 and IAS 32Offsetting financial assets and liabilitiesThe IASB published amendments to IFRS 7 and IAS 32, the standards that address disclosure and presentation requirements for financial instruments, respectively, related to offsetting financial assets and liabilities. The amendments provide new disclosure requirements relating to offsetting of financial assets and financial liabilities and do not change the criteria required for offsetting. We expect this standard will not result in a significant impact to our consolidated financial statements.IFRS 10Consolidated financial statementsIFRS 10 provides a definition of control determined by the following three elements: power over an investee, exposure to variable returns from an investee, and the ability to use power to affect the reporting entity's returns. Power is not defined as the legal or contractual right to direct activities, but is based on the ability to direct activities, which requires the entity to exercise significant judgment. Accounting requirements and consolidation procedures remain unchanged from IAS 27.IFRS 11Joint arrangementsIFRS 11 introduces a principle-based approach where a party to a joint arrangement recognizes its own rights and obligations arising from the arrangement. Joint arrangements not structured through a separate vehicle are classified as a "joint operation" and the accounting for transactions is in accordance with the contractual arrangement. Joint arrangements structured through a separate vehicle must be evaluated based on their legal form and the terms of the contractual arrangement; these arrangements are classified as either a joint operation or a joint venture based on this evaluation. Joint ventures are accounted for using the equity method. The most significant impact of this standard is therefore the elimination of proportionate consolidation as a method to account for joint arrangements.IFRS 12Disclosure of interests in other entitiesIFRS 12 enhances, and replaces the disclosure requirements for subsidiaries, joint arrangements, associates and unconsolidated structured entities. The standard requires a reporting entity to disclose information that helps users assess the nature and financial effects of the reporting entity's relationship with other entities. Disclosure requirements include information that helps users in understanding the judgments and assumptions made by a reporting entity when deciding how to classify its involvement with another entity, understand the interest that non-controlling interests have in consolidated entities, and assess the nature of the risks associated with interests in other entities.IFRS 13Fair value measurementIFRS 13 defines fair value, sets a framework for measuring fair value, and requires disclosures about fair value measurements. Generally, the standard does not introduce new requirements to measure assets or liabilities at fair value, change what is measured at fair value in IFRS, or address how to present changes in fair value, but rather consolidates guidance on fair value into a single standard and better clarifies measurement and disclosure objectives.IAS 19Employee benefitsThe IASB published amendments to IAS 19, the standard dealing with accounting for pensions and other post-retirement and post-employment benefits, most significantly: - Immediate recognition of all changes in a plan's funded status (i.e. removal of the corridor approach option for recognizing actuarial gains and losses) - streamlining the presentation of changes in assets and liabilities arising from defined benefit plans, including requiring re-measurements to be presented in other comprehensive income (OCI), thereby separating those changes from changes that many perceive to be the result of an entity's day-to-day operations - expanded disclosures about defined benefit plans, with an additional focus on describing the risks to which the plan sponsor is exposed because of the plan and the effect of the plan on the plan sponsor's future cash flows - We expect this standard will not result in a significant impact to our consolidated financial statements.IFRIC 20Stripping costs in the production phase of a surface mineIFRIC 20 is a new interpretation issued to provide guidance on stripping costs incurred in the production phase of a surface mine. The interpretation requires that production stripping costs incurred as part of a stripping campaign are capitalized as a component of the larger asset to which they relate. Subsequent to initial recognition, the component is recognized at cost less amortization, based on the expected useful life of the specific section of ore body that becomes directly accessible as a result of the stripping campaign, and less any impairment losses. As this guidance is consistent with our current accounting policy for stripping costs, we do not expect this interpretation to have a significant effect on our consolidated financial statements.We are currently assessing the impact that IFRS's 9, 10, 11 and 12 will have on our consolidated financial statements.6. First time adoption of IFRSWe have adopted IFRS from January 1, 2011, as required for publicly accountable enterprises in Canada. Our transition date is January 1, 2010 and we have adjusted the 2010 comparative information from what was previously reported under Canadian GAAP in order to conform to IFRS. Under IFRS 1 - First time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards, we must apply IFRS retrospectively at the transition date, changing retained earnings to incorporate all adjustments to assets and liabilities as stated previously under Canadian GAAP, except where we apply any exemptions that are available. We have applied the following significant exemptions:we did not restate acquisitions we made prior to January 1, 2010 in accordance with IFRS 3 - Business combinationswe reset the cumulative translation gains and losses in accumulated other comprehensive income to nil at January 1, 2010 and made the corresponding adjustment to retained earnings we applied IFRS 2 - Share based payments only to equity settled share based payment awards we granted after November 7, 2002 and that had not vested by January 1, 2010 for certain mines, we used a transitional calculation to determine the property, plant and equipment associated with our provision for asset retirement obligations. Under this calculation, we measured the provision at the transition date and discounted to the date the liability first arose. The result became the initial asset value we applied depreciation to. Balance sheet reconciliationsThe schedule below reconciles our Canadian GAAP and IFRS balance sheets as at January 1, 2010 (our transition date to IFRS).Canadian GAAPReclassificationsSubtotalAdjustmentsNotesIFRSAssetsCurrent assets:Cash and short-term investments$533,913$-$533,913$-$533,913Restricted cash15,130-15,130-15,130Accounts receivable129,987-129,98725,774i155,761Inventories103,108-103,108(4,784)i, ii98,324Current portion of held to maturity investments9,993-9,993-9,993Deferred income tax assets8,466(8,466)---800,597(8,466)792,13120,990813,121Restricted cash101,589-101,589-101,589Property, plant and equipment1,860,616-1,860,61685,053ii, iii, iv, v1,945,669Investments in equity securities42,411-42,411-42,411Held to maturity investments89,891-89,891-89,891Deferred income tax assets6,1515,07611,227(8,867)vii, viii2,360Other assets2,894-2,894(991)1,903$2,904,149$(3,390)$2,900,759$96,185$2,996,944LiabilitiesCurrent liabilities:Accounts payable and accrued liabilities$185,145$(15,047)$170,098$426i$170,524Provisions-17,41717,417-17,417Derivatives1,543-1,543-1,543Deferred income tax liabilities4,612(4,612)---191,300(2,242)189,058426189,484Long-term debt200,026-200,026-200,026Asset retirement obligations145,038(145,038)---Provisions-156,456156,45639,974vi196,430Other liabilities32,113(11,418)20,695-20,695Derivatives3,165-3,165-3,165Deferred income tax liabilities16,357(1,148)15,20910,523vii, viii25,732Non-controlling interest78,005(78,005)---666,004(81,395)584,60950,923635,532EquityShare capital669,952-669,952-669,952Contributed surplus63,296-63,2961,51364,809Stock based compensation5,170-5,170-5,170Retained earnings1,541,803-1,541,803(14,694)1,527,109Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(42,076)-(42,076)61,169ix19,093Total equity attributable to Inmet equity holders2,238,145-2,238,14547,9882,286,133Non-controlling interest-78,00578,005(2,726)75,279Total equity2,238,14578,0052,316,15045,2622,361,412Total liabilities and equity$2,904,149$(3,390)$2,900,759$96,185$2,996,944The schedule below reconciles our Canadian GAAP and IFRS balance sheets as at December 31, 2010.Canadian GAAPRe-classificationsSubtotalAdjustmentsNotesIFRSAssetsCurrent assets:Cash and short-term investments$326,425$-$326,425$-$326,425Restricted cash617-617-617Accounts receivable91,893-91,89327,533i119,426Inventories84,077-84,077(11,923)i, x72,154Current portion of held to maturity investments53,915-53,915-53,915Deferred income tax assets27,614(27,614)---Assets held for sale282,255-282,25536,827xi319,082866,796(27,614)839,18252,437891,619Restricted cash70,059-70,059-70,059Property, plant and equipment1,921,843-1,921,843(185,778)ii, iii, iv, v, x1,736,065Investments in equity securities2,694-2,694-2,694Held to maturity investments318,615-318,615-318,615Deferred income tax assets1,33612,78214,118(5,397)vii, viii8,721Goodwill76,368-76,368(76,368)x-Other assets4,865-4,865(2,530)2,335$3,262,576$(14,832)$3,247,744$(217,636)$3,030,108LiabilitiesCurrent liabilities:Accounts payable and accrued liabilities$153,111$(17,668)$135,443$902i$136,345Provisions-17,66817,668-17,668Liabilities associated with assets held for sale102,447-102,4479,449111,896255,558-255,55810,351265,909Long-term debt16,619-16,619-16,619Asset retirement obligations108,592(108,592)---Provisions-118,598118,59843,801vi162,399Other liabilities28,123(10,006)18,117-18,117Deferred income tax liabilities95,200(14,832)80,368(67,843)vii, viii12,525504,092(14,832)489,260(13,691)475,569EquityShare capital1,015,698-1,015,69873,878x1,089,576Contributed surplus64,972-64,9721,15966,131Stock based compensation6,542-6,542-6,542Retained earnings1,889,491-1,889,491(311,984)1,577,507Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(218,219)-(218,219)33,002ix(185,217)Total equity2,758,484-2,758,484(203,945)2,554,539Total liabilities and equity$3,262,576$(14,832)$3,247,744$(217,636)$3,030,108Notes to the balance sheet reconciliations as at January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010:ReclassificationsWe reclassified several items to conform to IFRS. The following are the most significant:non-controlling interests are under a separate component of equity. Under Canadian GAAP, we reported these as a liability. current deferred income tax assets and liabilities are under long term assets and liabilities. Under IFRS, all deferred income taxes assets and liabilities must be classified as long term. asset retirement obligations are under provisions. We previously reported these as a separate long term liability. certain employee compensation obligations are under current and long term provisions. Under Canadian GAAP, we reported them in accounts payable if they were current obligations, or as other liabilities if they were long term obligations. AdjustmentsRevenue recognition - at January 1, 2010 we increased accounts receivable by $25.8 million (December 31, 2010 - $27.5 million) and reduced inventory by $5.6 million (December 31, 2010 - $6.3 million). Under IFRS, we recognize revenue when all significant risks and rewards of ownership of our products are transferred to the purchaser. Under Canadian GAAP, title also had to legally transfer to the purchaser before revenue was recognized. For certain shipments at Çayeli, Pyhäsalmi and Ok Tedi, we transfer title when we receive the first provisional payment, which is later than the transfer point for risks and rewards of ownership. Reversal of impairment of assets - at January 1, 2010, we increased property plant and equipment by $51.9 million (December 31, 2010 - $41.1 million) to reverse an impairment charge we recognized for Çayeli in 1996. The increase is the IFRS carrying amount we would have calculated, net of depreciation, if we had not recognized the original impairment. Canadian GAAP did not allow for reversal of impairment charges after they were initially recognized. Under IFRS, we must reverse an impairment loss if there is a change in the estimates we used to determine the recoverable amount. In 1996, after Çayeli's first 2 years of operations, we recognized an impairment charge of $128 million against property, plant and equipment. At the time, zinc and copper recoveries were significantly lower than feasibility levels, and were continuing to deteriorate. The complex mineralogy of the Çayeli ore body, continuing poor metallurgical results and the possibility that no improvements may have been achievable were the main reasons for the impairment. After many initiatives and capital improvements, and many years of significantly improved production performance since that time, we concluded the extensive uncertainties underlying the original impairment no longer apply and, that Çayeli's recoverable amount exceeds its carrying value on our transition to IFRS. Plant and equipment at Ok Tedi - at January 1, 2010, we increased property, plant and equipment by $14.5 million. For plant and equipment that has been purchased after our initial proportionate consolidation of Ok Tedi, we used Ok Tedi's accumulated depreciation, which Ok Tedi has determined historically under IFRS. Property, plant and equipment associated with asset retirement obligations - at January 1, 2010, we increased property, plant and equipment by $8.8 million on our transition to IFRS (December 31, 2010 - $12.1 million). Under both IFRS and Canadian GAAP, we recognize a corresponding change in the provision for asset retirement obligations in the carrying value of the related property, plant and equipment and depreciate this amount prospectively. The amount of our asset retirement obligations under IFRS is different from the amount under Canadian GAAP as described in (vi) below, and therefore has an impact on our related assets. Foreign exchange forward contract - at January 1, 2010, we increased property, plant and equipment by $13.4 million on our transition to IFRS (December 31, 2010 - $11.5 million). To fix the amount of euros under its credit facility upon conversion to a US dollar denominated loan, Las Cruces entered into a forward contract to exchange US $215 million for €171.1 million. In 2008, this derivative settled on a net basis with Las Cruces receiving cash of €32.6 million ($52.3 million). Under Canadian GAAP, we applied hedge accounting for this contract. During the period that the credit facility was outstanding, Las Cruces capitalized the related interest under its credit facility as a cost of deferred development. We amortized the gain in property, plant and equipment, as a reduction of this capitalized interest. Under IFRS, this instrument does not qualify as a hedge for accounting purposes, and we reclassed the amount we had recognized against property, plant and equipment to retained earnings. Provision for asset retirement obligations - at January 1, 2010, we increased our provision for asset retirement obligations by $39.8 million (December 31, 2010 - $43.6 million). Under IFRS, we measure asset retirement obligations using a risk free interest rate, and revalue for changes in market risk free interest rates. Under Canadian GAAP, we used a credit adjusted risk free interest rate and were not required to remeasure for changes in market rates. Deferred income taxes - translation of non-monetary items - at January 1, 2010, we increased deferred income tax assets by $3.3 million (December 31, 2010 - $1.3 million). Under IFRS, when an entity's taxes are denominated in a currency that is not its functional currency (Çayeli and Ok Tedi), we are required to recognize deferred income taxes and liabilities related to the foreign exchange gains and losses for foreign non-monetary assets and liabilities that are re-measured into the functional currency, using historical foreign exchange rates. This was not allowed under Canadian GAAP. Deferred income taxes - as a result of the tax effect of changes to our opening balances under IFRS, we decreased deferred income tax assets by $12.2 million (December 31, 2010 - $6.4 million) and increased deferred income tax liabilities by $10.7 million (December 31, 2010 - decrease of $65.9 million). Cumulative translation adjustment - at January 1, 2010, we reset the cumulative translation gains and losses in accumulated other comprehensive income to nil, and recognized a corresponding decrease of $61.2 million in retained earnings, using an election under IFRS 1. Acquisition of non-controlling interest in Las Cruces - at December 31, 2010, we decreased inventory by $6.8 million, decreased property, plant and equipment by $247.0 million, decreased goodwill by $76.4 million and increased share capital by $73.9 million. Under Canadian GAAP, companies that acquire an additional interest in an entity they already control must account for it as a step acquisition. Under IFRS, acquiring a non-controlling interest is not considered a business combination, and is instead accounted for as an equity transaction. Under IFRS, we have accounted for our acquisition of the remaining 30 percent interest in Las Cruces which closed in December 2010, as an equity transaction, because we already controlled it. Assets and liabilities held for sale for Ok Tedi - on January 29, 2011, Ok Tedi Mining Limited repurchased our 18 percent equity interest in Ok Tedi for US $335 million, and we classified it as held for sale at December 31, 2010 (consistent to our Canadian GAAP presentation). Our share of Ok Tedi's assets and liabilities classified as held for sale under IFRS were $36.8 million and $9.4 million higher respectively than they were under Canadian GAAP because of the adjustments outlined above. Equity reconciliation - The table below reconciles total equity under Canadian GAAP to total equity under IFRS, and illustrates the after-tax effect of each of the most significant adjustments had on equity. NotesJanuary 1, 2010December 31, 2010Canadian GAAP equity$2,238,145$2,758,484IFRS adjustments:Reclassification of non-controlling interest to equity78,005-Revenue recognitioni14,21030,023Reversal of impairment of assets - Çayeliii42,39534,005Plant and equipment - Ok Tediiii10,18411,179Property, plant and equipment associated with asset retirement obligationsiv8,30412,175Foreign exchange forward contract - Las Crucesv9,3868,034Provision for asset retirement obligationsvi(38,349)(41,310)Deferred income taxesvii3,4812,870Acquisition of the non-controlling interest in Las Crucesx-(254,056)Other(4,349)(6,865)IFRS equity$2,361,412$2,554,539The schedule below reconciles our Canadian GAAP and IFRS net income for the three months ended December 31, 2010. The Canadian GAAP statement of earnings is presented in an IFRS format.(1)Canadian GAAPReclassi- ficationsOk TediAdjustmentsNotesIFRSGross sales$318,128$-$(116,582)$28,723i$230,269Smelter processing charges and freight(38,440)-10,220(7,513)i(35,733)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(98,625)2,03923,270(9,651)i(82,967)Depreciation(23,361)-6,949(2,470)iii, iv(18,882)Earnings from operations157,7022,039(76,143)9,08992,687Corporate development and exploration(3,975)--(1,459)(5,434)General and administration(4,767)--9(4,758)Investment and other income50,331-(19)310ii50,622Stand-by costs-----Finance costs(2,520)(2,306)224308(4,294)Income before taxation196,771(267)(75,938)8,257128,823Income tax expense(54,307)26727,945(5,865)vi(31,960)Income from continuing operations$142,464$-$(47,993)$2,392$96,863Income from discontinued operation (net of taxes)--47,993-47,993Net income$142,464$-$-$2,392$144,856Attributable to:Inmet equity holders$144,505$-$-$2,427$146,932Non-controlling interest(2,041)--(35)(2,076)$142,464$-$-$2,392$144,856(1) Under Canadian GAAP, we deducted the non-controlling interest's share of Las Cruces' income when calculating net income. Under IFRS, no deduction for this is made and net income is presented as separately attributable to the equity holders of Inmet Mining and to the non-controlling interest.The schedule below reconciles our Canadian GAAP and IFRS net income for the year ended December 31, 2010. The Canadian GAAP statement of earnings is presented in an IFRS format.(1)Canadian GAAPReclassificationsOk TediAdjustmentsNotesIFRSGross sales$1,098,087$-$(356,629)$37,098i$778,556Smelter processing charges and freight(166,754)-36,448(8,158)i(138,464)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)(345,764)6,34395,871(10,309)i, v(253,859)Depreciation(81,844)-27,513(1,657)i, iii, iv(55,988)Earnings from operations503,7256,343(196,797)16,974330,245Corporate development and exploration(12,036)--(1,459)(13,495)General and administration(20,638)--274(20,364)Investment and other income35,416-(32)22,960ii58,344Stand-by costs(6,753)---(6,753)Finance costs(6,873)(7,148)910(65)(13,176)Income before taxation492,841(805)(195,919)38,684334,801Capital tax expense(373)---(373)Income tax expense(134,682)80571,164(6,001)vi(68,714)Income from continuing operations$357,786$-$(124,755)$32,683$265,714Income from discontinued operation--124,755-124,755Net income$357,786$-$-$32,683$390,469Net income attributable to:Inmet equity holders$358,898$-$-$32,978$391,876Non-controlling interest(1,112)--(295)(1,407)$357,786$-$-$32,683$390,469(1) Under Canadian GAAP, we deducted the non-controlling interest's share of Las Cruces' income when calculating net income. Under IFRS, no deduction for this is made and net income is presented as separately attributable to the equity holders of Inmet Mining and to the non-controlling interest. Notes to the reconciliation of the statement of earnings for three months and year ended December 31, 2010:ReclassificationsWhen we adopted IFRS, we reclassified accretion of asset retirement obligations and capital lease obligations to finance costs. We recognized it as part of cost of sales under Canadian GAAP. Ok TediIn January 2011, we sold our 18 percent equity interest in Ok Tedi. As the operations and cash flows for Ok Tedi have been eliminated as a result of this disposal and we have no continuing involvement with this operation, we have presented our proportionately consolidated results from Ok Tedi as discontinued operations retroactively. The sale of our investment in Ok Tedi did not qualify for treatment as discontinued operations under Canadian GAAP. This change affects our entire income statement so we have disclosed it separately.AdjustmentsRevenue - for the three months ended December 30, 2010 we increased revenue by $28.7 million (year ended December 31, 2010 - $37.1 million) and made associated adjustments to smelter processing charges and freight, cost of sales and depreciation. Under IFRS, we recognize revenue when all significant risks and rewards of ownership of our products are transferred to the purchaser. Under Canadian GAAP, title also had to legally transfer to the purchaser before revenue was recognized. For certain shipments at Çayeli, Pyhäsalmi and Ok Tedi, we transfer title when we receive the first provisional payment, which is later than the transfer point for risks and rewards of ownership. Foreign exchange gains and losses - for the three months ended December 31, 2010, we reversed foreign exchange losses recognized under Canadian GAAP, which increased investment and other income by $nil million (year ended December 31, 2010 - $22.7 million). Under IFRS, only dividends that represent a return on capital invested in a foreign operation require recognition of previously deferred foreign exchange gains or losses. Under Canadian GAAP, dividends, including those related to the accumulation of earnings are considered a return on investment, and we recognized the deferred foreign exchange gains or losses on these amounts in investment and other income. Depreciation - we increased property, plant and equipment relating to the reversal of an impairment charge recognized for Çayeli, and made an associated increase in depreciation of $1.8 million for the three months ended December 31, 2010 (year ended December 31, 2010 - $7.9 million). Depreciation of property, plant and equipment associated with asset retirement obligations - we recognized a $0.2 million increase in depreciation for the three months ended December 31, 2010 (year ended December 31, 2010 - $6.3 million decrease). Under both IFRS and Canadian GAAP, we recognize a corresponding change in the provision for asset retirement obligations in the carrying value of the related property, plant and equipment and depreciate this amount prospectively. The amount of our asset retirement obligations under IFRS is different from the amount under Canadian GAAP, and therefore has an impact on our related assets and depreciation expense. Provision for asset retirement obligations - we increased cost of sales by $6.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 to increase our asset retirement obligations at our closed properties as a result of changes in discount rates. Under IFRS, we measure asset retirement obligations using a risk free interest rate, and revalue for changes in market risk free interest rates. Under Canadian GAAP, we used a credit adjusted risk free interest rate and were not required to remeasure for changes in market rates. Deferred income taxes - as a result of the tax effect of changes recognized in our income statement under IFRS, we increased income tax expense by $4.3 million for the three months ended December 31, 2010 (year ended December 31, 2010 - $4.8 million increase). The schedule below reconciles our Canadian GAAP and IFRS comprehensive income for the three months and year ended December 31, 2010. The Canadian GAAP statement of comprehensive income is presented in an IFRS format.Notesthree months ended December 31, 2010year ended December 31, 2010Comprehensive income reported under Canadian GAAP$22,668$181,643Total adjustments to net income2,39232,683Adjustments to other comprehensive income (loss):Currency translation adjustmentsi, ii1,441(28,167)Comprehensive income under IFRS$26,501$186,159Notes to the reconciliation of the statement of comprehensive income for the three months and the year ended December 31, 2010AdjustmentsCurrency translation adjustments - for the three months ended December 31, 2010, we reversed foreign exchange losses previously recognized in the statement of earnings under Canadian GAAP, which decreased other comprehensive income by $nil million (year ended December 31, 2010 - $22.7 million). Under IFRS, only dividends that represent a return on capital invested in a foreign operation require recognition of previously deferred foreign exchange gains or losses. Under Canadian GAAP, dividends, including those related to the accumulation of earnings and repayment of intercompany debt, are considered a return on investment, and we recognized the deferred foreign exchange gains or losses on these amounts in investment and other income. Currency translation adjustments - as a result of the currency translation impact of recognizing changes to our balance sheet under IFRS, we decreased other comprehensive income by $1.4 million for the three months ended December 31, 2010 (year ended December 31, 2010 - $5.5 million). Cash flow statementThe IFRS transition adjustments above did not have an impact on our cash and short-term investments. Differences in our cash flow statements between Canadian GAAP and IFRS are the result of non-cash adjustments to items in the statements of earnings outlined above and the presentation of Ok Tedi cash flows as discontinued operations (note 10). 7. Cash and short-term investmentsDecember 31, 2011December 31, 2010January 1, 2010Cash and cash equivalents:Liquidity funds$387,857$194,603$205,190Term deposits6,76352,99140,140Overnight deposits72,7014,31954,435Bankers acceptances920-92,200Money market funds130,48540,04819,951Corporate11,974--Bank deposits32,76427,16895,001Provincial short-term notes172,481--815,945319,129506,917Short-term investments:Corporate50,184-26,996Term deposits-7,296-Provincial short term notes193,339--Bankers acceptances23,425--266,9487,29626,996Total cash and short-term instruments$1,082,893$326,425$533,9138. Restricted cashDecember 31, 2011December 31, 2010January 1, 2010Collateralized cash for letter of credit facility - Inmet Mining$16,842$16,906$16,492In trust for Ok Tedi reclamation (note 10)--26,365Collateralized cash for letters of credit - Las Cruces54,17452,13872,008Collateralized cash for Pyhäsalmi reclamation1,6161,6321,85472,63270,676116,719Less current portion:Collateralized cash for letters of credit - Las Cruces(810)(617)(15,130)$71,822$70,059$101,5899. Held to maturity investmentsIn 2011, we purchased $287 million (2010 - $67 million) of US Treasury bonds and $15 million (2010 - $229 million) of long-term Canadian and Provincial government bonds. During the year, bonds with a face value of $69 million matured (2010 - $26 million).10. Sale of our interest in Ok TediOn January 29, 2011, Ok Tedi Mining Limited repurchased our 18 percent equity interest in Ok Tedi for US $335 million. Our interest in Ok Tedi met the criteria of an asset held for sale, so we presented our share of the results of operations of Ok Tedi as discontinued operations in the consolidated statements of earnings and the consolidated statements of cash flow retroactively. In 2011, after-tax income of $83 million from this discontinued operation includes net earnings of $17 million in January, before the sale, and a gain on sale of $66 million net of withholding taxes. Papua New Guinea withholding taxes of $28 million were paid on the sale and no Canadian taxes were payable because we used our Canadian tax pool attributes. The following tables provide a breakdown of our share of the earnings and cash flows at Ok Tedi for the three months and year ended December 31, 2010 and 2011.Statements of earnings three months ended December 31year ended December 312011201020112010Gross sales$-$116,582$44,865$356,629Smelter processing charges and freight-(10,220)(4,051)(36,448)Cost of sales (excluding depreciation)-(23,270)(12,116)(95,871)Depreciation-(6,949)(2,272)(27,513)-76,14326,426196,797Investment and other income-19(80)32Finance costs-(224)(33)(910)Income tax expense-(27,945)(9,670)(71,164)-47,99316,643124,755Gain on sale of our interest--79,029-Income tax expense on sale of our interest--(12,233)-Net income from discontinued operation$-$47,993$83,439$124,755Statements of cash flow three months ended December 31year ended December 312011201020112010Cash provided by operating activitiesBefore net change in non-cash working capital$-$61,348$-$153,962Net change in non-cash working capital-(16,529)-455-44,819-154,417Cash provided by (used in) investing activitiesCash proceeds on sale, net of withholding tax--306,982-Purchase of property, plant and equipment-(4,481)-(16,344)-(4,481)306,982(16,344)Cash used in financing activities-(9,268)-(10,556)Foreign exchange change on cash held in foreign currency-(2,686)-(4,177)Net cash from discontinued operation$-$28,384$306,982$123,34011. Accounts payable and accrued liabilitiesDecember 31, 2011December 31, 2010January 1, 2010Accounts payable and accrued liabilities$121,592$94,792$106,701Amounts payable related to metal sales761592103Income taxes payable20,79640,96163,720$143,149$136,345$170,52412. ProvisionsThe table below shows the significant components of our provisions.December 31, 2011December 31, 2010January 1, 2010Asset retirement obligations (a)$176,007$168,589$198,291Employee benefits and other13,11911,47815,556189,126180,067213,847Less current portion:Asset retirement obligations (a)(11,279)(16,417)(13,500)Employee benefits and other(2,238)(1,251)(3,917)(13,517)(17,668)(17,417)$175,609$162,399$196,430(a)Asset retirement obligationsWe recorded an additional $17 million this quarter, and for the year, for closure liabilities at our closed properties. $12 million of this increase is the result of a decrease in the discount rates we applied in determining the liabilities. Additionally, we recognized a $5 million increase in our estimated closure obligations at Troilus for higher tailings pond and labour costs. In 2010, we recorded increased asset retirement obligations of $16 million: $10 million for closure liabilities at Troilus to reflect the longer time we expect will be required for post-closure monitoring, as well as higher owner and other costs, and $6 million from a decrease in the discount rates we applied.13. Common share issuance On May 17, 2011, Temasek Holdings (Private) Ltd. exchanged its subscriptions receipts for 7.78 million Inmet common shares and we received cash of $500 million, plus accrued interest on funds in escrow during the subscription period.14. Stock-based compensation During the second quarter of 2011, a number of changes were made to equity-based compensation plans following a review of senior management compensation: Stock option planOn June 27, 2011, shareholders approved a share option plan (SOP) for senior management, enabling them to purchase Inmet common shares, with a reserve of 2.8 million common shares. The exercise price is determined by the Board at the time the option is granted, and may not be less than the volume weighted average price of Inmet common shares for the five preceding trading days (5 day VWAP). In the absence of specific vesting conditions determined by the Board at the grant date, each grant will vest 25 percent per year for four years, with each amount vesting on the anniversary of the grant date (graded vesting).An initial grant of 380,000 options was made to senior management on May 10, 2011, with an exercise price of $65.11, graded vesting and an expiry date of May 10, 2018. We calculated the compensation expense for these options using the Black Scholes valuation model assuming the following weighted average parameters, resulting in a weighted average fair value per option of $28.86 per option: 5 year expected life, 49 percent expected volatility, expected dividend rate of 0.3 percent annually and a risk free interest rate of 2 percent. Performance share unit planEffective May 10, 2011, we adopted a performance share unit plan (PSUP) for senior management with an initial grant of 29,488 performance share units (PSUs). The Board grants PSUs at its sole discretion with grants generally being equal in value to a percentage of an executive's annual base salary. The vesting period for the PSUs is the three year period commencing on January 1 of the year in which a PSU grant is made and ending on November 25th of the second year following the year in which the grant is made. Each PSU is settled in cash based on the 5 day VWAP prior to November 25 of the second year following the year of the grant.We used a Monte Carlo simulation model to calculate the compensation expense for the PSUs assuming no forfeitures, 3 year historical average volatilities and a risk free interest rate of 0.95%, resulting in a December 31, 2011 fair value of $101.87 per PSU. Long-term incentive planOn May 10, 2011, the LTIP units associated with Las Cruces were redeemed with a vesting performance factor of 60 percent, based on the board's assessment of senior management performance for the project. The board decided to redeem the LTIP units for $3.4 million in cash based on the 5 day VWAP of $65.11. Additionally, the LTIP has been replaced by the SOP and PSUP described above. The 312,000 LTIP units associated with Cobre Panama remain in place and will be redeemed in accordance with the LTIP provisions. However, no additional LTIP units will be granted as a result of the replacement of the plan. Share award planThe share award plan has been terminated for the 2011 year onwards in conjunction with the establishment of the SOP and PSUP. Shares already awarded under the plan will continue to vest according to the original vesting period and no additional shares will be awarded.In 2011, we recognized the following share-based compensation expense in general and administration:three months ended December 31year ended December 312011201020112010Stock option plan$1,428$-$3,808$-Performance share unit plan470-775-Long-term incentive plan--759382Deferred share unit plan2322171,030990Share award plan1513326211,322$2,281$579$6,993$2,69415. Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) includes:December 31, 2011December 31, 2010January 1, 2010Unrealized losses on gold forward sales contracts (net of tax of nil) (December 31, 2010 - $2,427, January 1, 2010 - $2,015)$-$(5,661)$(4,701)Unrealized gains (losses) on investments (net of tax of $94) (December 31, 2010 - $78, January 1, 2010 - $4,788))(552)(452)23,794Currency translation adjustment(164,232)(179,104)-Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)$(164,784)$(185,217)$19,093Currency translation adjustmentsThe table below is breakdown of our currency translation adjustments.December 31, 2011December 31, 2010January 1, 2010Pyhäsalmi (euro functional currency)$(28,277)$(24,354)$-Las Cruces (euro functional currency)(106,456)(93,427)-Çayeli (US dollar functional currency)(15,563)(20,908)-Cobre Panama (US dollar functional currency)(13,936)(29,701)-Ok Tedi (US dollar functional currency)-(10,714)-$(164,232)$(179,104)$-The Canadian dollar to US dollar exchange rate was $1.02 at December 31, 2011, $0.99 at December 31, 2010 and $1.05 at January 1, 2010. The Canadian dollar to euro exchange rate was $1.32 at December 31, 2011, $1.33 at December 31, 2010 and $1.50 at January 1, 2010.16. Investment and other incomethree months ended December 31year ended December 312011201020112010Interest income$4,821$2,887$16,627$8,234Dividend and royalty income1,5086343,0413,173Foreign exchange gain (loss)(8,601)(1,464)10,789(968)Gain on sale of investments-50,505-50,505Other(1,739)(1,940)268(2,600)$(4,011)$50,622$30,725$58,344Foreign exchange gain is a result of: three months ended December 31year ended December 312011201020112010Translation of US dollar cash and held-to-maturity investments$(9,029)$(72)$3,338$(47)Translation of Turkish lira taxes payable at Çayeli(287)(1,131)4,027(672)Translation of other monetary assets and liabilities715(228)3,424(249)$(8,601)$(1,431)$10,789$(968)17. Finance coststhree months ended December 31year ended December 312011201020112010Interest on note payable$292$292$1,156$1,148Accretion on note payable182162692618Interest on loans from non-controlling shareholder In Las Cruces- 2,066- 5,107Accretion on provisions and capital lease obligations1,9161,7747,6366,303$2,390$4,294$9,484$13,17618. Income taxFor the three months ended December 31, 2011:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalCurrent income taxes$(1,629)$8,166$82$7,073$13,692Deferred income taxes(88)1,5888,280(243)9,537Income tax expense$(1,717)$9,754$8,362$6,830$23,229For the three months ended December 31, 2010:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalCurrent income taxes$544$14,828$-$9,900$25,272Deferred income taxes6,360(1,965)(20)2,3136,688Income tax expense$6,904$12,863$(20)$12,313$31,960For the year ended December 31, 2011:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalCurrent income taxes$(2,242)$48,378$625$32,320$79,081Deferred income taxes(210)4,24222,911(601)26,342Income tax expense$(2,452)$52,620$23,536$31,719$105,423For the year ended December 31, 2010:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalCurrent income taxes$6,386$38,706$-$26,765$71,857Deferred income taxes1,914(2,821)(4,094)2,231(2,770)Income tax expense$8,300$35,885$(4,094)$28,996$69,08719. Net income per sharethree months ended December 31year ended December 31(thousands)2011201020112010Income from continuing operations available to common shareholders$48,072$98,939$264,732$267,121Income from discontinued operations available to common shareholders-47,99383,439124,755Net income available to common shareholders$48,072$146,932$348,171$391,876three months ended December 31year ended December 31(thousands)2011201020112010Weighted average common shares outstanding69,332 57,05366,432 56,345Plus incremental shares from assumed conversions:Deferred share units122108122108Long term incentive plan units-431843Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding69,454 57,20466,572 56,496The table below shows our earnings per common share for the three months ended December 31. three months ended December 31(Canadian dollars per share)20112010BasicDilutedBasicDilutedNet income from continuing operations per share$0.69$0.69$1.73$1.73Income from discontinued operations per share--0.840.84Net income per share$0.69$0.69$2.57$2.57The table below shows our earnings per common share for the year ended December 31.year ended December 31(Canadian dollars per share)20112010BasicDilutedBasicDilutedNet income from continuing operations per share$3.99$3.98$4.74$4.73Income from discontinued operations per share1.261.252.212.21Net income per share$5.25$5.23$6.95$6.9420. Statements of cash flowsThe tables below show the components of our net change in non-cash working capital by segment.For the three months ended December 31, 2011:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalAccounts receivable$355$(18,222)$(6,980)$6,522$(18,325)Inventories-(3,108)(5,147)(1,329)(9,584)Accounts payable and accrued liabilities2,326843(4,438)1,534265Taxes payable(1,184)(6,809)82(8,114)(16,025)Provisions(54)---(54)Other-984-(264)720$1,443$(26,312)$(16,483)$(1,651)$(43,003)For the three months ended December 31, 2010:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalAccounts receivable$973$10,671$(613)$(22,335)$(11,304)Inventories89(4,416)(9,844)1,426(12,745)Accounts payable and accrued liabilities(5,066)6498,9364,0348,553Taxes payable2,0528,591-6,67717,320Other1,29389(215)-1,167$(659)$15,584$(1,736)$(10,198)$2,991For the year ended December 31, 2011:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalAccounts receivable$(185)$13,319$(11,271)$16,396$18,259Inventories-(1,158)(7,966)(1,372)(10,496)Accounts payable and accrued liabilities1,1797,8658,815(242)17,617Taxes payable(5,048)(829)(89)(14,701)(20,667)Provisions(713)---(713)Other-1,207-(264)943$(4,767)$20,404$(10,511)$(183)$4,943For the year ended December 31, 2010:Corporate and otherÇayeli (Turkey)Las Cruces (Spain)Pyhäsalmi (Finland)TotalAccounts receivable$10,289$(15,559)$(1,290)$(22,859)$(24,419)Inventories9,881(5,263)(11,975)32(7,325)Accounts payable and accrued liabilities(9,791)(2,009)11,802(1,207)(1,205)Taxes payable(8,853)8,118-5,7475,012Other1,289(1,188)(215)-(114)$2,815$(15,901)$(1,678)$(18,287)$(33,051)21. Capital commitments Our operations had the following capital commitments as at December 31, 2011:Las Cruces committed $3.4 million for the purchase of plant and water equipment. Cobre Panama committed $187.0 million for the design and supply of two SAG mills, four ball mills and the related gearless drives, basic engineering, resource drilling and early works. 22. Events after balance sheet date In January 2012, we received notice from KPMC that it had elected, under its option agreement, to acquire a 20 percent interest in MPSA, the owner and developer of Cobre Panama, which would leave Inmet with an 80 percent interest. At closing, KPMC would be required to invest approximately US $155 million into MPSA, representing KPMC's share of historical development costs incurred to the date of the option agreement and their proportionate share of development costs incurred above a funding cap of US $150 million.FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Jochen TilkInmet Mining CorporationPresident and Chief Executive Officer+1.416.860.3972ORFlora WoodInmet Mining CorporationDirector, Investor Relations+1.416.361.4808www.inmetmining.com