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Luxury houses and apartments with multi-million dollar price tags tower over Sydney Harbour, September 19, 2003. The booming Australian economy is being fuelled largely by soaring house prices, but the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned that the "housing bubble" may burst, leaving many heavily-mortgaged Australian homeowners in financial hardship. (WILL BURGESS)
Luxury houses and apartments with multi-million dollar price tags tower over Sydney Harbour, September 19, 2003. The booming Australian economy is being fuelled largely by soaring house prices, but the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned that the "housing bubble" may burst, leaving many heavily-mortgaged Australian homeowners in financial hardship. (WILL BURGESS)

Personal Finance Reader

On strike for lower housing prices Add to ...

The best of the Web on money, markets and all things financial, as chosen daily by Globe and Mail personal finance columnist Rob Carrick.



On Strike For Lower Housing Prices

A tax-reform group in Australia came up with an interesting idea to fight soaring house prices - encourage people to go on a home-buying strike. It didn't work, in large part because many people don't actually want house prices to decline.

More related to this story

They're Hip To Our Tricks

Five negotiating strategies for buying cars and other stuff that don't impress sales people as much as we might think.

Hot Coffee, Cold Calculations

A look back what transpired in a multi-million dollar lawsuit that a 79-year-old woman launched against McDonald's after she was burned by the fast food chain's takeout coffee. Bet you don't know the real story.

They Don't Want Your Junk

Charities like the Salvation Army are always in the market for used stuff they can sell to raise money, but they're not a disposal service for the junk in your basement. In fact, junk dumped at Salvation Army donation centres has cost the charity big bucks in disposal fees.





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