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Social Studies

Can your dog get you dates? Add to ...

Can your dog get you dates?

“Having trouble securing a date for Friday night? You might want to blame your dog,” says The Huffington Post. “According to a recent survey by mobile pet app Klooff, certain dog breeds are more likely to attract members of the opposite sex than others. And while the results differ slightly among men and women, caring for Labrador retrievers and golden retrievers seem to be a surefire way to be noticed. The study of 1,000 pet owners and non-owners also revealed that although some pooches might attract singles looking for relationships, some breeds tend to attract individuals just looking for some action. Men noted that they judged women with Chihuahuas as dumb, hot and easy; while women said they viewed men with bulldogs as one-night-stands, according to the report.”

The mass of the masses

“Humanity could stand to lose a few pounds,” writes Rachael Rettner for MyHealthNewsDaily. “If the entire human population stepped on a scale, the weight would be 316 million tons, or 632 billion pounds, a new study finds. The overweight people in the world carry a total of 16 million tons of extra weight – that’s the equivalent of 242 million normal-weight people. … The average body mass, globally, was 136 pounds (62 kg). In North America, which has the highest body mass of any continent, the number was 178 pounds (80.7 kg).” The study, by Ian Roberts of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, is published in the journal BMC Public Health.

Sleeping Beauty syndrome

“Sleepy Stacey Comerford, 15, suffers from a rare neurological disorder which means she enters a sleeping state for months at a time,” reports Britain’s The Sun. “The last – her longest at two months – meant she missed nine exams after being predicted straight As. Stacey, from Telford, Shropshire, is just one of 1,000 people worldwide to suffer from Kleine Levin Syndrome, also known as Sleeping Beauty Syndrome. … During an episode she can sleep for 20 hours a day and only gets up in a trancelike state to sip water or use the loo. Mum Bernie Richards slips in some food to keep her alive before she makes it back to bed. Stacey has lost nearly two stone [12.7 kg] because of the condition. Mum-of-six Bernie, 53, said: ‘There’s never any warning. I’ve even found her fast asleep on the kitchen floor.’ ” There is no known cure for the syndrome but some sufferers grow out of it.

Laugh like a dog

“Humans can imitate sounds of dog laughter,” says Discover magazine, “but it takes conscious monitoring of mouth shape to get the sound pattern right. Producing dog laughter correctly, says [Stanley Coren, author of the forthcoming book Do Dogs Dream?], can make your dog sit up, wag his tail, approach you from across the room, and even laugh along.”

Round your lips slightly to make a “hhuh” sound. Note: The sound has to be breathy with no actual voicing.

Use an open-mouthed smiling expression to make a “hhah” sound. Again, breathe the sound. Do not voice it.

Combine steps one and two to create canine laughter. It should sound like “hhuh-hhah-hhuh-hhah.”

Intolerable laughter

“When you’re smiling, the whole world smiles with you,” says The Daily Telegraph, “but when you’re laughing, your neighbours complain of ‘mental agony, pain and public nuisance.’ At least, they do in Mumbai where the High Court has ordered members of a ‘laughter yoga’ club to restrain their joy. … The case was brought by 78-year-old lawyer Vinayat Shirsat and his family after an informal yoga club started meeting in a lakeside gazebo by their bungalow. They complained that between 10 and 30 devotees gathered outside their house every morning at 6 a.m. and started signing devotional songs, clapping and exhorting one another to laugh out louder.”

Krypton, not Akron

“Ohio officials said they are seeking alternative slogans for a Superman-themed licence plate that DC Comics did not want to say “Birthplace of Superman,” United Press International reports. “State Representative Bill Patmon said officials wanted a Superman plate to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Man of Steel, but DC Comics and Warner Communications objected to the ‘birthplace’ slogan because it might cause confusion about the character’s origins on the planet Krypton.”

Thought du jour

“In Britain, police officers stormed into a village pub that was advertising live music “from 4am” – only to find that was the name of the band,” says Orange Co. UK. “Two police officers and two licencing officers had called in at The Feathers in Laleham, Surrey, to stop the performance.”

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