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Social Studies

Not all mustache implants are created equal Add to ...

Mustache transplants

“Thick, handsome mustaches have long been prized by men throughout the Middle East as symbols of virility, wisdom and maturity,” says CNN. “But not all mustaches are created equal and, in recent years, increasing numbers of Middle Eastern men have been going under the knife to attain the perfect specimen. Turkish plastic surgeon Selahattin Tulunay says the number of mustache implants he performs has boomed in the past few years. He now performs 50 to 60 of the procedures a month on patients who hail mostly from the Middle East and travel to Turkey as medical tourists. He said his patients generally want thick mustaches as they feel they will make them look mature and dignified.”

 

Movember goes coed

A Staffordshire housewife has joined thousands of men around Britain by sprouting facial hair for Movember, Orange Co. U.K. reported last week. “Siobhan Fletcher, 36, who has suffered from excessive facial hair since she was a teenager, is growing a mustache and goatee. In the past, the condition, caused by polycystic ovary syndrome, has left her afraid to leave the house, reports The Mirror. … She said: ‘It was a spur of the moment decision. It isn’t a sideshow. I’m doing it to raise awareness for cancer.’”

 

To sleep, perchance to drive?

 

“More people are reporting sending text messages during their sleep, says Dr. Kirstie Anderson, who runs the Neurology Sleep Service for the Newcastle Upon Tyne Foundation Trust,” reports BBC News, which notes that many Britons own cellphones and many also take them to bed. “‘It is very common for people to do things in their sleep that they do repeatedly during the day,’ says Anderson. This is largely down to sleep disorders called parasomnias. These are unwanted behaviours that occur during sleep. They can be as small as opening your eyes while asleep or, at the very extreme end, driving a car while sleeping. Anderson has even treated someone who carefully dismantled grandfather clocks while asleep.”

 

Body and soul’s window

“Contrary to popular belief, looking at someone’s face alone is not enough to tell us whether they are roaring in celebration or screaming in frustration, researchers claim,” writes Nick Collins in The Daily Telegraph. “While people may believe they have the ability to read each other’s faces, body language is the real clue that reveals whether strong emotions someone is feeling are positive or negative. In a study published in the journal Science, groups of participants were shown a series of intense facial expressions – such as tennis players photographed just after winning or losing a point. In some cases, the volunteers were able to see the player’s full body, but in others they were only shown either their face or their body with the other removed. Participants could clearly tell whether the players were winning or losing when shown the full picture or just the body, but their guesses were no better than chance when based on the face alone.”

 

Dogs? Expensive companions

 

“Millionaires prefer to have dogs as pets, according to a recent study by Spectrem Group,” says The Huffington Post. “While 58 per cent of millionaire pet owners have a dog, only 37 per cent reported having a cat.” It’s not just millionaires, added the Post. Mre than 70 per cent of executives who owned pets reported that they owned a dog. “The millionaire preference for pooches could be explained by the costs of pet ownership. Dogs are more expensive to provide routine health care for, to travel with and to feed, according to the American Pet Products Association.”

 

Thought du jour

The dog … commends himself to our favour by affording play to our propensity for mastery.

-Thorstein Veblen, American economist (1857-1929)

 

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