Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Impress Your Guests

Origami as a table accent Add to ...

After years of entertaining, one thing has become clear to me: People love to see their names when they approach a dining table. Consequently, I always make sure to incorporate stylish and unique place cards, which not only direct guests to their seats, but can also serve as mementos for guests to take home.

More Related to this Story

Not long ago, one of my kids received an origami starter kit on his birthday and I thought the folded shapes we constructed would make beautiful table accents. The lotus flower was among my favourites, as it sits flat and will hold a name card in its petals nicely.

To make my own, I went to The Paper Place, a Toronto shop that carries the finest chiyogami paper. This lovely, thick paper is ideal for place cards and comes in a variety of colours and patterns. Choose versions that complement your table and get creative. The following instructions are a simplified version. You can see a detailed instruction video at www.origami-fun.com)

Turn an 8-by-8-inch square of paper pattern-side down and fold it on the diagonal, then open it up and fold on the other diagonal. This will form reference lines in an X pattern.

Fold each corner into the centre so you have four triangles popping up. Repeat, folding four more corners into the centre.

Flip the square over and fold the four corners into the centre of the backside. Crease the edges, then unfold so it lies flat.

Flip the square over and fold the four corners into the centre of the backside. Crease the edges, then unfold so it lies flat.



Flip the shape over, taking care to retain the same horizontal alignment. Fold the four corners of the square shape into the centre. This will form four petals.

Carefully flip it again and lift the final four points away from the centre, exposing the plain side of the paper.
Grasping the flower at its centre, carefully ease each of the final points around to the front until you have a second set of petals.

(Repeat steps 1 to 6 using a smaller sheet of paper and glue or tape the second lotus into the centre of the larger flower.)

Sebastien Centner is the director of Eatertainment Special Events in Toronto ( www.eatertainment.com).

 

In the know

Most popular videos »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most popular