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Lemcon cured can be served with fresh fruit, meringue, vanilla ice cream or yogurt or use to fill bite-size tart shells. (Tad Seaborn for The Globe and Mail)
Lemcon cured can be served with fresh fruit, meringue, vanilla ice cream or yogurt or use to fill bite-size tart shells. (Tad Seaborn for The Globe and Mail)

Impress guests with this no-fuss lemon curd Add to ...

If I wasn’t so lazy I’d be eating lemon curd all the time. But that would require standing and stirring the egg-yolk lemon mixture over a bain marie, a technique I imagine pulling out only for special dinner parties if I really want to impress my guests. But recently I heard about a microwave lemon curd recipe and my heart skipped a beat (this had happened once before when I discovered making bacon in the oven).

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One bowl, a few stirs, the pressing of a button. And suddenly I had a jar of lemon curd – to eat any time, totally alone, no guests allowed. Mine. All mine. Go away and make your own.

This will make about 2 cups.

In a medium, microwave-safe bowl combine 3 eggs and 3/4 cups white sugar. Whisk until well combined.

Add 1/2 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice, 2 teaspoons of lemon rind and 1/2 cup melted butter.

Microwave, uncovered for 3-5 minutes, stirring every minute until the mixture thickens (it should coat the back of a spoon).

Allow to cool in the fridge where it will set further.

Note: The reason you cook a curd in a bain marie is to prevent the eggs from scrambling by using indirect heat. If your microwave is newer, or very powerful, start a couple notches below full power to cook slower and keep the curd smooth. If you do end up with a grainy first batch, you can just pass it through a fine sieve.

Serve with fresh fruit, meringue, vanilla ice cream or yogurt or use to fill bite-size tart shells.

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