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Warm potato and asparagus salad Add to ...

This salad has lots of flavour, but without too much heat. It is adapted from a recipe by Segar Kulasegarampillai, whose restaurant Segar in Toronto is known for its tasty intercontinental food. This will serve two as a vegetarian main course or can be a side dish with anything off the grill.

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  • Preparation time: 15 minutes
  • Cooking time: 20 minutes
  • Ready time: 35 minutes
  • Servings: 4

Ingredients

1 pound (500 grams) Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled

12 stalks fresh asparagus

Pinch turmeric

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 medium onion, thinly sliced

½ teaspoon mustard seeds

½ teaspoon cumin seeds

1 teaspoon garam masala

3 tablespoons coriander leaves

3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Method

Cut potatoes into 1-inch cubes. Remove tough ends from asparagus and cut stalks into 3-inch pieces.

Add potatoes to a pot of cold salted water with turmeric and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-high and cook for 10 minutes or until just barely tender. Strain and spread out to cool.

Add asparagus to a pot of boiling salted water and blanch for 1 minute or until just undercooked. Drain and rinse until cold.

Heat vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes or until transparent. Add mustard, cumin seeds and garam masala and cook for 1 minute or until fragrant. Fold in potatoes and asparagus and toss to coat vegetables. Cook for 2 minutes to heat through, then stir in coriander leaves and lemon juice. Season well with salt and pepper.

Serves 4

Suggested Wine Pairings

Our ancient ancestors must have eaten asparagus without the benefit of a cool glass of sauvignon blanc. My only question is: How? The pairing is close to perfect. Herbaceous sauvignon blanc matches the zesty vegetable in flavour as well as freshness. For these recipes, I'd choose one from New Zealand, where they specialize in a fruity style that's both savoury and suggestively sweet because of its conspicuous tropical fruit notes. Other good choices include pinot gris, gruener veltliner or semillon. -Beppi Crosariol

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