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I lost 30 pounds for my wedding. How do I keep the weight off now that it’s over? Add to ...

The question: I lost 30 pounds before my wedding. I don’t want to slip back into old habits now that I am married. I want to lose a final five pounds. Any advice?

The answer: Going forward, try not to fixate on the number on the scale. The closer you are to your ideal weight, the harder it will be for you to lose weight on the scale. Plus, the scale doesn’t differentiate between fat, water and muscle loss. I don’t want you to get discouraged if you lose inches and fat, instead of weight on the scale.

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So, sure, aim to lose five more pounds, but find additional ways to measure your health success. The more methods you use to track your progress, the more reasons you have to stay on a positive health track.

Aim for your clothes to fit differently, your monthly measurements to change and, most importantly, for your fitness level to improve.

Train for a 5K race, join a sports team or work toward doing a certain number of push-ups or squats.

Lastly, and this may sound obvious: Be honest with yourself. Many of us, either consciously or unconsciously, sabotage ourselves by misrepresenting reality. This is especially true after a big, exhausting life event like a wedding. Sure, you think you want to lose five pounds, but staying disciplined after a pivotal moment often takes more energy then one is able (or willing) to give. If you decide you want extra wine, or to skip a workout, enjoy the wine and the rest. Just own the choice. Be honest with yourself regarding how your indulgence will effect your goals, and try not too overindulge too frequently.

Trainer’s tip: We are all more than a number on a scale. At least once per day, take a moment to acknowledge the positive health choices you made. This will allow you to replicate positive choices, and will hopefully propel you to have a generally more positive day. I am not suggesting you take an “oh well, who cares” approach to your health, just keep life in perspective. You just got married and lost 30 pounds – don’t forget how awesome those two things are!

Kathleen Trotter has been a personal trainer and Pilates equipment specialist for 10 years. Her website is www.kathleentrotter.com.

Follow us on Twitter: @Globe_Health

 

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