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What can I snack on after an intense workout? Add to ...

The question

I'm always famished after my workout. What are some good snack options? (Some vegan suggestions would be appreciated.)

The answer

I can totally relate. Sometimes after an intense workout I am so hungry, I feel like I could eat the entire fridge.

Having nutritious food ready and convenient is key for me, so I don't end up grabbing any old thing. I suggest packing a healthy snack containing both carbs and protein in your gym bag. The more intense the workout, the more important it is for you to refuel within 45 minutes to ensure proper muscle repair.

More related to this story

A few suggestions:

- 16 ounces of chocolate milk, soy milk or almond milk.

- an apple and a small handful of almonds.

- a pre-made shake with water, protein powder and fruit. A good vegan protein powder is made by Vega.

Also, you may feel famished because you are leaving too much time between eating and working out. Try to have a snack two to three hours beforehand.

Trainer's tip: I like to prepare healthy snack options at the beginning of the week. This way I always have healthy food, in appropriate portions, available at my fingertips. I cut up vegetables and store them in a Tupperware container so I can quickly assemble a salad, and I prepare individual plastic bags of snacks like trail mix that I can grab whenever I need portable fuel.



Send certified personal trainer Kathleen Trotter your questions at trainer@globeandmail.com. She will answer select questions, which could appear in The Globe and Mail and/or on The Globe and Mail web site. Your name will not be published if your question is chosen.

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