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How to handle a family divided Add to ...

Dementia is a disease of the family: when a loved one becomes sick, family members can often be divided on the steps for treatment.

For Pat Mutch, it was her husband - who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's himself - who refused to accept the disease and the treatment that was prescribed.

Readers asked questions and shared their stories: Read the discussion on family mediation with elder mediation expert Judy McCann-Beranger and Pat Mutch. Readers using mobile phones can see a friendlier version here.

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