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Baby Point house on large lot sells to first visitor Add to ...

29 BABY POINT CRES., TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $2,395,000

SELLING PRICE $2,370,000

PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE $785,000 (1994)

TAXES $15,219 (2014)

DAYS ON THE MARKET Two

LISTING AGENT Nutan Brown, Royal LePage West Realty Group Ltd.

The Action: When it hit the market, this stately three-storey house was one of only two available on this short crescent street in Baby Point. It sold to the first house hunter to step inside.

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What They Got: This 86-year-old structure on a 75-by-170-foot lot has a centre hall plan with five bedrooms, five bathrooms and both formal and casual entertaining areas, plus a detached double garage.

There are fireside living and family rooms, a formal dining room and office with hardwood floors, as well as a custom kitchen with slate floors, island and walkout to a covered portico, south-facing deck and fenced-in yard with gardens and mature oaks.

The largest bedroom is a second-floor master suite with a walk-in closet, fireplace and bathroom, while one of the smallest is on the lower level off a recreation room with a wet bar and fireplace.

The Agent’s Take: “The presentation was really lovely, it had been nicely updated over the years … and added a main-floor family room, open-concept kitchen and powder room, so it checked a lot of boxes of what people are looking for,” agent Nutan Brown says. “It’s a nice combination of an older home with modern updates.”

The outdoor living space was another perk. “It also has a beautiful setting overlooking a ravine-like [area],” Ms. Brown says.

“The timing [of the sale] was great – the garden was starting to bloom, so everything looked lush and green.”

Editor's note: Done Deals contain information gathered from real estate agents, home buyers, home sellers and sale prices that are publicly available from government sources. While we try to publish Done Deals as soon as possible after the transaction has occurred, long closings can cause delays.

 

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