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Condo’s tasteful blend of past and present tempted buyers Add to ...

38 EARL ST., NO. 5, TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $529,000

SELLING PRICE $520,000

PREVIOUS SELLING PRICES $498,000 (2013); $455,000 (2011); $326,000 (2008); $237,000 (2003); $130,000 (1995)

TAXES $2,707 (2014)

DAYS ON THE MARKET 34

LISTING AGENTS Jenelle Cameron, Laura Golbeck and Miranda Mckenna, Re/Max Hallmark Realty Ltd.

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The Action: On a quiet street a few blocks from Sherbourne subway station on Bloor Street, a small conversion project rarely has vacancies, so it was uncommon to have three units available this year. This one-bedroom model was toured by about 15 buyers before a deal was signed mid-June.

What They Got: A Victorian mansion was reconfigured to house 13 condominium townhouses, each with their own entrance, but different sizes and setups. This two-storey unit occupies the main and lower levels of one wing of the brick structure and features 1,250 square feet of living space with 10-foot ceilings and hardwood floors.

There is a fireside living room, a dining area and custom kitchen recently revamped with new cabinetry, granite counters and stainless-steel appliances, including a wine fridge, plus a lower-level bedroom and patio.

Tucked away is a four-piece bathroom, laundry facilities and storage, as well as interior access to parking underground. Monthly fees are $614.

The Agent’s Take: “It’s the only [converted mansion] I know of and the way the mansion was set up, it almost looks like this one is in a house on its own,” says agent Jenelle Cameron.

“The little patch of grass in front looks like it would belong to this unit, but it doesn’t.”

Buyers were also enamoured of the mix of past and present styles. “It’s beautifully renovated throughout, full of windows and light, high ceilings, and the kitchen was absolutely stunning, [which the sellers] spent $30,000 renovating,” Ms. Cameron says.

“It has a Victorian feel to it, and crown moulding and everything else was replicated to give it a unique feel.”

 

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