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Ground-floor Liberty Village loft space was project’s model suite Add to ...

43 HANNA AVE., NO. 126, TORONTO

ASKING PRICE

$585,000

SELLING PRICE

$575,000

PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE

Not available

TAXES

$3,962 (2012)

DAYS ON THE MARKET

Four

LISTING AGENT

Christopher Bibby, Sutton Group-Associates Realty Inc.

The Action: In the Toy Factory Lofts in Liberty Village, this one-bedroom-plus-den loft was listed unsuccessfully for months.So the seller recruited Christopher Bibby – an expert at selling lofts and downtown condominiums – who minimized and reorganized the furnishings and raised its price tag to reflect its fashionable and functional makeover. Within days, there were about 20 showings and a serious buyer who negotiated a deal that offered more money than the original list price.

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What They Got: A historic brick building once serving as a factory for Irwin Toy is now a premium destination filled primarily with authentic lofts, such as this roughly 1,200-square-foot version with exposed brick walls and 13-foot wood ceilings.

This ground-floor space was the project’s model suite, so the sellers enjoyed its tailor-made furnishings and finishes, from built-in Miele and Viking appliances in the Scavolini kitchen to dark hardwood floors and glass and wood-panelled walls in the living and dining area.

Semi-enclosed spaces include a den and a master suite with a walk-in closet and the smaller of two marble-clad bathrooms.

Ensuite laundry facilities, a locker and parking are factored into the price of the unit, which is tied to monthly fees of $387 for water and heating, concierge and amenities, such as a gym, party room and terrace with barbecue stations.

The Agent’s Take: “If you want to live in a hard loft in Liberty Village, this is the only option because it’s all condos and soft lofts [there],” Mr. Bibby said. “To get into the building you’re looking at over half a million dollars, whereas the other buildings, the average is in the mid-$300,000s or high $300,000s.”

But some buyers were willing to pay the price for a one-of-a-kind loft like this.

“This is probably the most renovated and unique plan I’ve seen at the Toy Factory Lofts,” Mr. Bibby said.

“As an incentive, the builder [originally] left the suite ‘as is,’ … all the lighting, custom-made furniture and the kitchen was custom, not the traditional Scavolini kitchen that all the other units had.”

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