Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

The condo unit 302 at One Columbus Ave. features a streamlined Scavolini kitchen with opaque glass doors on the cabinets and integrated appliances.
The condo unit 302 at One Columbus Ave. features a streamlined Scavolini kitchen with opaque glass doors on the cabinets and integrated appliances.

Home of the Week: Former Toronto factory goes glam loft Add to ...

One Columbus Ave., Unit 302

Asking price: $1.295-million

Maintenance fees: $736.47 monthly

Agent: Robin Pope (Brad J. Lamb Realty Inc.)

The Back Story

For many years, workers arrived at a red brick factory in Parkdale to stitch baseball gloves for Rawlings.

By the mid-1990s Rawlings had long departed and One Columbus was converted into a hard loft. Large wood posts, steel beams and walls of honey-coloured brick are reminders of the building’s past. The old freight elevator shaft on the west side of the factory was converted into a series of balconies.

More related to this story

The building has 10 lofts, no common areas, and no amenities on offer.

“It’s a small building – very intimate and very private,” says real estate agent Robin Pope of Brad J. Lamb Realty Inc.

The early residents arrived to a gritty neighbourhood that was a long way from gentrification. But the trendy areas of Queen and Dundas streets have migrated west and One Columbus is now walking distance to some of the coolest bars and restaurants in the city.

“This part of the city is an extension of Queen West,” says Mr. Pope. “It finally feels connected to the downtown core.”

Sociable Sorauren Park – which has gone through a renaissance of its own – is right across the street.

The Unit

When the owner first visited the former baseball glove factory, he was quite sure he wanted to live closer to downtown. But when he saw Unit 302, it suited him so well he bought it with all of the previous owner’s furniture in place, says Mr. Pope.

Unit 302 is one of the many with a private elevator that rises straight to the suite.

“People like the cachet of direct elevator access,” says Mr. Pope.

The elevator doors open into a large living space that combines the living room, dining room and kitchen. The unit offers 2,300 square feet.

“Every room in the place is huge,” says Mr. Pope.

The streamlined Scavolini kitchen has opaque glass doors on the cabinets and integrated appliances. The island is topped with a thick slab of stone.

Along a corridor, two bedrooms and a den overlook the quiet street below. To bring more light to the interior, the previous owners installed reclaimed windows along the walls of the corridor.

Doors reclaimed from an old Toronto hotel and vintage pieces in the bathroom add character.

The balcony in the steel framework of the former elevator shaft offers a view over the rooftops and trees of the neighbourhood.

Another uncommon aspect of the unit is that it has assigned parking for three cars, says Mr. Pope. There is a garage plus two surface parking spots.

“It’s really unusual to secure a private garage.”

The Best Feature

The current owner decided to bring some 1930s-era glamour to the master suite. The ensuite bathroom was renovated with black-and-white marble mosaic floors and a built-in marble-topped vanity. In the bedroom, wallpaper with images reminiscent of art deco Manhattan adds drama.

In the know

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories