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The high-rise home of Sebastian Koo, penthouse three, 25 Capreol Court, CityPlace, Toronto (William Kwok/William Kwok)
The high-rise home of Sebastian Koo, penthouse three, 25 Capreol Court, CityPlace, Toronto (William Kwok/William Kwok)

Home of the Week: Sky-high living in the heart of Toronto Add to ...

25 CAPREOL COURT, PENTHOUSE 3, TORONTO

ASKING PRICE: $1.2999-million

MAINTENANCE FEES: $856.18

AGENT: Boris Kholodov, Royal LePage Johnston and Daniel Division

THE BACK STORY

Sebastian Koo is more accustomed to sky-high living than most people: The young designer has lived in penthouses in Hong Kong, Shanghai, San Francisco and Vancouver.

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In Hong Kong, he lived on the 72nd floor, he explains, so he’s accustomed to the view from up high. In this case he’s on the 34th-floor at Luna in Concord CityPlace.

Mr. Koo chose the penthouse for its south-facing view and wrap-around balcony that looks over Lake Ontario and the Billy Bishop Toronto City airport.

It’s one of only three suites on the floor.

It’s also far enough from the ground that he doesn’t hear the noise of traffic passing by on the Gardiner Expressway between CityPlace and the lake.

THE PENTHOUSE TODAY

Mr. Koo purchased the 1,550 square-foot unit move-in ready, with the usual kitchen and flooring and bathrooms in place. But he immediately tore out everything except the bathrooms.

His aim, he says, was to create a large, open space where his guests could mingle at parties without feeling crowded.

“I like to be able to entertain 30 or 40 people at a time.”

Mr. Koo is a home theatre designer who is passionate about interior and has done the decor for several apartments.

He had sound equipment and speakers built into the 10-foot high ceilings. While the ceilings were torn out, he had a new lighting system put in.

“I wanted to make the place as minimalist as possible,” Mr. Koo said. “It’s very modern and very sophisticated, the way an actual penthouse should look.”

He panelled the walls in an oak veneer with a deep brown finish to eliminate almost all of the drywall.

Mr. Koo also wanted a kitchen that suited his spare style.

“I ripped the entire kitchen out and re-built it from scratch.”

Today the kitchen cabinets are made of stainless steel and the 13-foot island is faced with the same dark oak as the walls. It is topped with Statuario marble. He had an extra wine fridge built into the base and, at one end of the extra-long island, he uses the space for folding laundry. The washer and dryer are tucked away nearby.

The guest bedroom and the master bedroom both have floor-to-ceiling windows facing the lake.

The white-tiled main bathroom is the builder’s original. Another bathroom is folded into the master suite.

Real estate agent Boris Kholodov says the wall-to-wall glass facing the harbour, a marina and the south edge of the city provide plenty to look at. The balcony is 240 square feet.

“You have amazing views at night too,” says Mr. Kholodov. “It’s beautiful by day, beautiful by night.”

THE BUILDING AND COMMUNITY

Luna is one building in CityPlace, which is what the developers call a “master-planned community” on old railway lands south of Front Street West and east of Bathurst. The area’s features include a child care centre, stores, a newly-opened pub, and Canoe Landing Park.

A school, a community centre and a library are planned.

The amenities in the complex that Luna belongs to include an outdoor lap pool with an infinity edge. The developers are striving to create the impression of being in a relaxing spa, with a waterfall, themed cabanas, an outdoor dining area and an alfresco bar located in an “urban forest” on the rooftop of a lower-level building. Inside, residents can use exercise facilities, a theatre, sauna and billiards.

“There’s a Montessori right down there,” says Mr. Koo, as he points out the school for young children.

It’s also a short distance from waterfront trails, the Rogers Centre and the nightlife of King Street West.

And one more perk for light packers: “You can literally walk to the airport,” Mr. Koo says.

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