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North York townhouse sells over asking in just 48 hours Add to ...

11 EVERSON DR., NO. 610, TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $669,000

SELLING PRICE $673,000

PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE $550,000 (2009); $308,097 (2002)

TAXES $3,718 (2013)

DAYS ON THE MARKET Two

LISTING AGENTS Jeff, Mark, Norah and Paul Oulahen, Re/Max Realtron Realty Inc.

The Action: Five to ten townhouses may come up for sale annually in the Carriage Homes of Avondale community in North York, so this four-bedroom unit swiftly scored two offers after more than a dozen were steered through.

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What They Got: More than a decade ago, developer Shane Baghai built a condominium townhouse complex with traditional elements, such as this three-storey unit with east-facing windows, front entrance and patio off a treed courtyard and direct access to parking via the basement.

The decor is modern with hardwood floors, pot lights and crown mouldings in the fireside living and dining area, and stainless steel appliances and granite counters and floors in the eat-in kitchen, as well as two of three bathrooms remodelled with Caesarstone, marble and ceramic tile surfaces.

The second and third floors are identical with two carpeted bedrooms.

Monthly fees of $424 cover water and maintenance of common elements.

The Agent’s Take: “It was the only offering of that style of unit,” says agent Mark Oulahen. “Other [townhouses] you can drive up to the front door, but they’re more expensive.”

Though this unit has other benefits. “There is an underground parking garage and everyone’s parking spot is right in front of your basement door, which is nice,” Mr. Oulahen adds.

“[The sellers] had updated the two bathrooms and it was very tidy, so it showed well.”

Editor's Note: Done Deals contain information gathered from real estate agents, home buyers, home sellers and sale prices that are publicly available from government sources. While we try to publish Done Deals as soon as possible after the transaction has occurred, long closings can cause delays.

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