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Currated Properties’s Lanehouse condos will have 13 loft houses and three flats within a industrial building at 50 Bartlett Ave., near Dufferin and Bloor streets.
Currated Properties’s Lanehouse condos will have 13 loft houses and three flats within a industrial building at 50 Bartlett Ave., near Dufferin and Bloor streets.

On Site: Laneway living for mainstream Toronto buyers Add to ...

LANEHOUSE

LOCATION: Bloordale

BUILDER/DEVELOPER Curated Properties

SIZE 1,000 to 2,000 square feet

PRICE Low $500,000s to over $999,000

CONTACT To register, phone (416) 900-5574 or visit lanehouse50.com

Adam Ochshorn, principal of Curated Properties, has overseen many unique urban infill projects in his career.

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But next month’s launch of his company’s latest development – one of the few residential laneway projects in Toronto – poses an opportunity buyers may not want to miss, himself included.

“If I could afford it, I’d like to have a unit in each project, but this project especially is so rare, I don’t know if this is ever going to be created in Toronto again,” said Mr. Ochshorn, whose only purchased a place he has worked on once before. “I’m keeping a unit for my kids.”

The few laneway residences in existence are often single-family homes custom designed by architects for personal use, but this development, called Lanehouse, will encompass 13 loft houses and three flats within a industrial building at 50 Bartlett Ave., near Dufferin and Bloor streets.

“I don’t know of any other project where there’s an adaptive reuse for a turn-of-the-century building that’s located 80 per cent in a laneway,” Mr. Ochshorn said.

“You’re smack dab in the middle of the city, but you have total peace and quiet [since] you have no real vehicular traffic in front or behind you.”

AUDAXarchitecture and Nivek Remas are also paramount in their approach to modernizing the factory – previously manufacturing yarn and most recently boilers – in a way that complements its original architectural details.

“The few examples of laneway housing that we saw in Toronto were mostly new construction and very contemporary stucco boxes,” said Mr. Ochshorn, whose team also travelled to New York to study laneway houses.

“A majority of our units have 18-foot ceilings, exposed brick and exposed steel beam accents, so it’s a combination of building new, but keeping the building envelope from the turn-of the century building.”

Following the shape of the infill site, the L-shaped complex will have a cobblestone entrance off Bartlett Avenue, a lobby and corridor to the majority of suites.

Stone, reeded glass, brass and iron finishes will add a contemporary edge to the units, which will generally offer three-storey plans with open principal rooms, double height areas by the warehouse windows and master suites with skylights above the private bathroom and walk-in closets.

Models will also have balconies or private rooftop terraces with custom wood enclosures. “Every unit, no matter what type will have a generous size outdoor connection – not just a balcony in a condo,” Mr. Ochshorn added.

“You’ll have at least 180 squarefeet as a minimum, so it’s enough room to set up a dining room table and a couch and actually entertain.”

A garage with a stacking system will provide parking for $30,000.

However, residents can live car-free with bike storage on site and established amenities nearby, such as the Dufferin subway station, Bloor Street shops and restaurants, such as The Emerson, Drift Bar and Bar Isabel, as well as Dufferin Grove Park and artist centre, Mercer Union.

Occupancy is slated for summer, 2015.

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