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Howard Park 2 Roncesvalles Village

On Site: Roncesvalles mid-rise aims to give single-family feel Add to ...

TRIUMPH DEVELOPMENTS

LOCATION: RONCESVALLES VILLAGE

SIZE 413 to 1,016 square feet

PRICE Low-$300,000s to over $1-million

SALES CENTRE 60 Howard Park Ave., east of Roncesvalles Avenue. Open Monday to Thursday from noon to 6 p.m.; weekends from noon to 5 p.m.

CONTACT Phone 416-873-0989 or visit howardpark.ca

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Developer Mario Ribeiro of Triumph Developments has seen house hunters spend $800,000 to $1-million buying properties in disrepair just to move into the popular Roncesvalles Village community.

So, he wanted the second phase of his boutique development to provide many luxuries of a single-family home, as well as the comforts of a care-free condominium starting from the low-$300,000s.

“It’s very difficult for families now to find a home in this neighbourhood at a price they can afford,” says Mr. Ribeiro. “Here, you have an option in an established area to buy a unit with two or three bedrooms with terraces.”

At a later date, two-storey townhouses and penthouses will add even larger suites – nearly 1,900 square feet – to the collection available in this eight-storey building, which is part of a mid-rise complex on Howard Park Avenue, near Roncevalles Avenue.

“We have a lot of the same great things we have for phase one,” Mr. Ribeiro says. “But we’re not really afraid of trying new things.”

In terms of similarities, these eight-storey buildings will both give the illusion of a steep hill with a cascade of private landscaped terraces and textured metal façade permitting vine growth.

“There’s a special cladding that we designed with RAW Design so that the greenery will grow into the walls … which is very unique for phase one and that’s being maintained in phase two,” he says.

“[Plus] we’ve designed a green component that grows on terraces that are viewed from the units, but are part of common elements, so they’re maintained by the condo, not individual owners.”

The sustainable structure will also feature locally sourced finishes, energy-efficient appliances, windows and mechanics, as well as a green roof, rainwater collection system and geothermal heating.

Other appointments will include nine- and 10-foot ceilings, laminate floors, European-style cabinetry and stone counters, along with gas connections on terraces and in kitchens.

“In phase one, we didn’t know now the market would react so we made it available on the fifth to eighth floors and everyone in the building is still asking for it,” Mr. Ribeiro says. “So for phase two we just decided to provide gas in every unit.”

Open concept principal rooms will also lie at the heart of studios to three-bedroom plus den suites.

“What’s different for phase two is we do have a much larger variety of units due to the configuration of the site,” says Mr. Ribeiro, pointing to the lot’s triangular shape. “Out of 96 units, there are about 56 different models, so it’s a very customized building.”

The balance of the project will accommodate a courtyard with barbecues, a party room, lounge and fitness centre. “We have a dog spa in phase two, again due to

client demand,” adds Mr. Ribeiro, who is a dog owner. “Anything I can see myself using or doing, I say let’s try that.”

Retail space will add to the vibrant mix of family-owned stores, eateries, lounges and galleries on major streets nearby, as well as schools, parks and transit, including the Bloor-Dundas stop of the Union Pearson Express to be done in 2015.

“The great urban story about this building is how it will connect the Roncesvalles and Dundas strip,” says Mr. Ribeiro, who is happy to replace the drab auto body shop previously on site. “The other thing that makes this special is extensive transportation in this quadrant.”

Monthly fees will be 51 cents per square foot. Parking is an extra $33,500 and lockers $3,500. Occupancy is slated for April, 2016.

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