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Six offers for Scarborough bungalow Add to ...

30 DURRINGTON CRES., TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $484,800

SELLING PRICE $485,000

PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE $238,000 (2001)

TAXES $2,491 (2012)

DAYS ON THE MARKET 11

LISTING AGENT Ken Priestman, Century 21 Leading Edge Realty Inc.

The Action: Just a couple of blocks from Thomson Memorial Park, this detached, brick bungalow was actively advertised through the St. Andrews community and social media networks to capture early spring buyers. The publicity brought in about 30 open houses attendants, which is good traffic for that time of year, says agent Ken Priestman. Six hopeful buyers tabled offers.

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What They Got: A 60-by-94-foot lot is largely occupied by this more than 50-year-old bungalow with three bedrooms, two four-piece bathrooms, an eat-in kitchen and combined living and dining area with crown mouldings and refinished hardwood floors.

The basement apartment is set up with two bedrooms, a recreation area with cooking facilities and a separate side entrance to a fenced yard, shed and wide private driveway.

The Agent’s Take: “The neighbourhood is quite popular and bidding wars are probably more the norm than the exception,” says Mr. Priestman. “It’s in close proximity to public schools, Scarborough General Hospital, LRT and transit out of Scarborough Town Centre.”

This bungalow also had desirable traits that likely helped it sell for 10 per cent more than the average of six bungalows sold nearby in the months before and after the new year. “It was a very bright, clean home and it showed very well,” Mr. Priestman adds.

“The standard lot in the area is anywhere between 40- and 50-feet wide, but this particular lot was 60-feet wide.”

Editor's Note: Done Deals contain information gathered from real estate agents, home buyers, home sellers and sale prices that are publicly available from government sources. While we try to publish Done Deals as soon as possible after the transaction has occurred, long closings can cause delays.

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