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Suite in former Simpsons warehouse sells on second try Add to ...

155 DALHOUSIE ST., NO. 1013, TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $599,900

SELLING PRICE $575,000

PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE $263,591 (1999)

TAXES $3,565 (2013)

DAYS ON THE MARKET 26

LISTING AGENT Boris Kholodov, Royal LePage Real Estate Services Ltd., Johnston and Daniel Division

The Action: This two-bedroom suite in the Merchandise Building failed to find a buyer when listed this winter, but a second appearance on the market with a different agent and a reduced price under $600,000 encouraged about 20 potential buyers to tour the interior and one to negotiate an offer.

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What They Got: In the former Simpsons warehouse, design firm Cecconi Simone created a collection of lofts, such as this 1,300-square-foot unit with an entry corridor flanked by sliding doors to the bedrooms, which have access to the living, dining and cooking area along a wall of windows.

Interior appointments include exposed duct work, engineered wood floors and granite counters, as well as stainless steel appliances, laundry machines and two full bathrooms.

Parking comes with the unit, which owes monthly fees of $773 for water and heating.

The Agent’s Take: “This is a layout that is quite common in the building,” agent Boris Kholodov said. “It’s very open, however you have to walk through one of the bedroom to get to the main living space, which is okay for buyers who do not need privacy.”

This century-old structure is also a popular conversion project. “Most authentic loft conversions are usually very plain and don’t offer the facilities that this one does,” Mr. Kholodov said.

“There’s even a basketball court in the building.”

Editor's note: Done Deals contain information gathered from real estate agents, home buyers, home sellers and sale prices that are publicly available from government sources. While we try to publish Done Deals as soon as possible after the transaction has occurred, long closings can cause delays.

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