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Done Deal, 1999 Gerrard St. E., Toronto
Done Deal, 1999 Gerrard St. E., Toronto

Walk to the beach sells East Toronto storefront Add to ...

1999 GERRARD ST. E., TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $629,000

SELLING PRICE $590,000

PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE $353,000 (2011); $355,000 (2007)

TAXES $5,002 (2010)

DAYS ON THE MARKET 50

CO-OP AGENT Anil Khera, Royal LePage West Realty Group Ltd.

THE ACTION: Agent Anil Khera was recruited by North York homeowners to find a more central property that could accommodate a private residence and a piano studio. This over century-old building offered the most potential in an up-and-coming neighbourhood near the beach, so they negotiated a deal for $590,000.

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WHAT THEY GOT: Standing prominently on a 15 by 80-foot corner lot, this brick building was elegantly restored of its vintage signage, wood panelling and rosettes, but also gutted, renovated and expanded with new roofing, mechanics and contemporary interiors.

The commercial space on the main floor is a bright, open area with pot lights and ceramic flooring.

The bi-level residential apartment has a rear entrance into a foyer with a powder room and stairs to the second floor, where there two bedrooms and a full bathroom, as well as a a living area with hardwood floors and exposed brick walls and an updated kitchen with ceramic floors and stainless steel appliances.

Other perks include an unfinished basement with a full bathroom and separate entrance.

THE AGENT’S TAKE: “[The area]is becoming a bit trendy with great cafes, a couple good restaurants and bookstores,” says Mr. Khera.

“You can get to the water, the boardwalk and all the good things about the Beach within a ten minute walk. You can also get to the Danforth and subway very quickly, and Kingston Road, Gerrard, Danforth and Queen Street, which are arteries to get you downtown.”

His clients were also happy this property required less work than other candidates they saw. “They tended to be either very highly priced or needed a lot own work for the amount of money we would have to pay,” Mr. Khera explains. “There was some work required [here] but it was manageable to personalize it.”

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