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Stock photo (Kriss Russell/Thinkstock)
Stock photo (Kriss Russell/Thinkstock)

'Making money off your mistakes:' Meet the creator of 'stalker porn' Add to ...

A problematic website called IsAnyoneUp.com is taking amateur pornography to the next level.

The site encourages visitors to submit nude photos of their exes, hookups, friends or anyone else who's ever 'sexted' them, and then cross references the racy photos with screen grabs of the unconsenting subjects' actual Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr accounts - whatever's floating out there.

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“People get popular really quickly once their photos are up there,” Hunter Moore, the site's flippant creator told Forbes.

"Many of the photos that wind up on the site are 'revenge porn' — pornographic souvenirs from relationships gone sour," wrote Forbes' Kashmir Hill.

Plenty of sites have let partners scorned share intimate moments with the world, including ExGirlFriendPics, as well as other sites that shame exes with sordid tales of wrongdoing, posted alongside a photo.

But appending to all that personal Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr accounts is a new ballgame.

Mr. Moore, a 25-year-old former hair stylist from San Francisco, claims his site now enjoys 30 million page views a month. He's gotten death threats and been stabbed by a San Francisco woman aggrieved by the sight of her sext and social media info sitting side by side on the Web. (Mr. Moore now no longer posts locals.)

Still, no one's managed to sue him. As long as the subjects are over 18, IsAnyoneUp is in the clear: The Communications Decency Act of 1996 protects website owners from legal liability around material their users post.

“Mr. Moore, by only posting third-party content remains legally immune, even though he encourages people to send in pictures,” Aaron Messing, an information privacy lawyer told The Awl.

Mr. Moore employs a small army as well as a photo investigation system to ensure none of the photos constitute child pornography. To his (minor) credit, when underage pics are submitted, he alerts a lawyer who then hands over the sender's IP information to police.

Mr. Moore said he's cashing in on stupidity.

"I'm making money off your mistakes," he told The Awl. "It might sound rough, but how else are you going to learn not to do this again? It’s like you’re playing Russian Roulette like, oh, let’s hope this doesn’t get out.”

If the exposure weren't enough, the site also slots the unconsenting subjects into categories of desirability, "gnargoyle" being not so hot. Mr. Moore also offers a "bounty" for nude photos of individuals he's trolled on Facebook, and liked.

What do you think: Is it up to individuals to practise common sense with tech, or do we need better privacy laws to protect them?





Follow on Twitter: @ZosiaBielski

 

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