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(Stockbyte/Thinkstock)
(Stockbyte/Thinkstock)

Parents want more time to teach kids - but miss teachable moments Add to ...

Many parents complain about the hours and hours of homework they help their children with every night. But a new poll suggests many wish they had more, not less, time to spend on educating their kids.

The Ipsos Reid survey, which was conducted on behalf of ABC Life Literacy Canada, asked more than 1,000 parents between the ages of 18 and 55 about their role in their child’s education.

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A majority of parents - 62 per cent - said that “they don't have as much time as they'd like to spend helping their kids learn,” according to the Canadian Press.

Still, 70 per cent of them also said that they are their child’s best teachers, with 63 per cent disagreeing with the statement that “the primary place for a child to learn is at school, not home.”

This doesn’t mean these folks are home-schooling, though. Reading, helping with homework, playing games, using a computer, writing stories and visiting a library were the top activities cited by parents as educational, reports CP.

But the poll identified other lesser-used activities that might also be helpful with literacy and numeracy - such as involving kids in chores and cooking.

Only 14 per cent said they always use paying their bills as a learning opportunity, with 19 per cent using the sorting and matching potential of laundry.

More parents - 27 per cent - use baking and cooking as a teaching tool. And yes, reading the pizza box for instructions can count, Margaret Eaton, president of ABC Life Literacy Canada, told CP.

One possible explanation the poll found, could be a lack of parental confidence, especially on the math front. In another survey, the literacy group found that 79 per cent of respondents “weren't fully confident in their ability to teach another person about money, saving and budgeting,” according to CP.

Are parents, indeed, the most important educators of their children? (What about teachers?) Parents, do you wish you could do more on this front?

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