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(Thinkstock/Thinkstock)
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Pregnant? Facebook makes it even easier to share the news Add to ...

It used to be that expectant parents shared the news of their pregnancy with friends and family in person or, if a face-to-face meeting wasn't possible, over the phone. Now, with a click of the mouse, they can do it on Facebook.

That's right, the social-media site that allows people to notify each other that they're "in a relationship," "engaged," "separated" or "in a civil partnership" has now added the status "Expected: Child" to its list of profile options, CBS News reports.

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The new status is found under the "Friends and Family" section of the "Edit Profile" page - as if Facebook isn't already inundated with baby photos and updates from parents.

It's somewhat of a paradox for Facebook to introduce the new option, considering the site previously shut down a profile page of a four-month-old fetus, set up by the excited parents. As Gawker points out, Facebook's policy doesn't allow children under 13 to have accounts. (Why you'd give your unborn child a Facebook page is another question.)

Of course, having a baby is big news, and it's understandable that people would inevitably like to share it with others. But is it acceptable etiquette, or even wise, to announce one's pregnancy over Facebook?

For starters, what happens if something goes awry? Parents-to-be traditionally keep mum for the first trimester (until there's less of a risk of miscarriage) before they share their news. If something were to go wrong, no status change could address the sense of loss, pain and awkwardness that often follows.

And what if your next-door neighbour's friend's aunt finds out about your impending parenthood before your closest relatives check their Facebook newsfeeds?

What's the biggest news you've ever shared over social media?

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