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Justin Bieber, right, kisses his mother Pattie Mallette as they arrive at the 40th Anniversary American Music Awards on Sunday, Nov. 18, 2012, in Los Angeles. (Jordan Strauss/Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Justin Bieber, right, kisses his mother Pattie Mallette as they arrive at the 40th Anniversary American Music Awards on Sunday, Nov. 18, 2012, in Los Angeles. (Jordan Strauss/Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Should Justin Bieber’s mommy be making excuses for his bad-boy behaviour? Add to ...

Justin Bieber’s image may be falling apart one scandal at a time but his mom still thinks he’s just a rambunctious teenager.

Following yet another week of Bieber bad-boy antics, the Canadian pop star’s mother, Pattie Mallette, has been making the rounds on TV the past few days to defend his behaviour. Because that’s what moms do.

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Mallette’s public defense of her pop-star progeny comes toward the end of another image-denting week that began with the release of a video showing Bieber urinating in a janitor’s mop bucket in a New York club and ended with the arrest of rapper Lil Twist for driving the singer’s sports car in Los Angeles.

While in the New York club, the Biebs also managed to dishonour former U.S. president Bill Clinton by spritzing his picture with bleach and shouting, “F–k Bill Clinton!”

Bieber, 19, has since made a public apology to Clinton, but like a teen leaving his clothes all over the house he’s left most of the cleanup duty to his mother, who has been all over TV this week to defend her little darling.

Although she normally keeps a respectably low profile, Mallette appeared Wednesday on the talk show Watch What Happens Live, which airs on the U.S. cable channel Bravo.

“I definitely think he’s getting a bad rap,” Mallette, 38, told host Andy Cohen, “but I’m also not naïve to think that my child is perfect and making all the best decisions of his life.”

As the old song goes, Mallette attempted to accentuate the positive by pointing out her boy’s charitable endeavours. “Every night before a show, he meets with Make-a-Wish kids. He goes to sick kids’ hospitals. He visits with them and takes his time. He gives back to charities.”

That same day, Mallette appeared on The View where she more less mounted the same feelgood defense of her son and claimed that she routinely provides him with motherly advice: “I just try to encourage him to stay true to who he is and stay grounded and humble.”

And in an interview that aired Thursday on ET Canada, Mallette gave the impression that she was pretty much powerless to change Bieber’s wayward behaviour anyway.

“I just deal with whatever comes up, I think as you would if your kid was off to college and making decisions. You just … I just talk to him, I call him … and he knows what I think.”

While on ET, Mallette was predictably coy on the current rumour that Bieber and ex-girlfriend Selena Gomez have reunited. “There’s some things that he just wants to keep private and keep sacred, but you know I’m gonna support him, whatever, he decides and I think he’s made good decisions so far.”

And while mama bear was making excuses for her cub on television, the fresh reports of Bieber highjinks just kept rolling in.

On Thursday, a Chicago nightclub was cited for allegedly serving booze to the singer and his entourage. Further details on the Lil Twist arrest revealed the rapper was openly smoking weed when he was caught speeding in Bieber’s chromed-out Fisker Karma sports car. Remember the old adage about being known by the company you keep?

Meanwhile, where exactly was Justin Bieber this past week? Keeping his now-standard low profile and attempting to appear humble with a message for his nearly 42-million Twitter followers:

“In life u will make mistakes and people will try and tear u down...but u gotta stay positive. Stay strong..and learn to be better…”

And always make sure mom’s in your corner.

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