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Shoppers Drug Mart location at Woodbine and O'Connor Avenues in Toronto. (Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail)
Shoppers Drug Mart location at Woodbine and O'Connor Avenues in Toronto. (Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail)

Too soon? Shoppers Drug Mart yanks Christmas music after complaints Add to ...

Too soon?

Shoppers Drug Mart yanked its Christmas music Friday after customers complained the strains of Jingle Bell Rock had descended too early this season.

“Hi everyone, due to recent complaints around the Christmas music being played in stores we want to advise you that as of midnight EST tonight, all Christmas music will be suspended until further notice,” read a post on the chain’s Facebook page this afternoon.

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“We do take customer feedback to heart, and it does lead to change. Thank you for your patience around this and have a fabulous Friday.”

“Suspended until further notice?” Sounds ominous, but it may be a sign retailers are finally comprehending the public’s malaise around Christmas creep. Earlier on Friday – two days after Halloween – Christmas began trending on Twitter; Starbucks also issued its signature red cups, heralding the start of the neurotic holiday season.

So far, news of Shoppers’ jingle ban has yielded over 4,000 likes on Facebook. Many suggested the beauty chain broke an unspoken rule: no Christmas music before Nov. 11.

“I love Christmas and the music but I do agree with we should wait til at least after Remembrance Day to respect our Vets and not over shadow their Day and Bravery,” wrote one commenter on the store’s Facebook page.

But many others seemed incensed that their beloved holiday tunes had been pulled on account of some bleating “Grinches.”

“Why are so many people against christmas music? NO worse then playing Justin Bieber music all year round,” wrote another Facebook commenter. “gotta say was in there yesterday and my 15 year old starting singing away. Nice to see a teenager so happy,” chimed in another. (Was it Bing Crosby, or Mariah Carey? Unclear.)

Other critics of the jingle ban wondered if it represented a further shift to cultural accommodation, much like supplanting the word “Christmas” for the non-denominational “holidays,” ousting festive decorations from school buses and federal offices – that did not go down well last year.

You may be pondering loofahs with the Chipmunks warbling Hula Hoop in your ear sooner than you think.

Is Shoppers Drug Mart’s Christmas music ban commendable, or Grinch-worthy?

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