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Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth. (GEOFF HOWE)
Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, B.C.’s Representative for Children and Youth. (GEOFF HOWE)

Children's watchdog will not be restricted from accessing cabinet documents Add to ...

There will be no new law restricting B.C.'s children's representative from accessing cabinet documents.

Former judge Ted Hughes says the government has agreed to ditch the proposed legislation after several days of talks.

The discussions were mediated by Mr. Hughes, the architect of B.C.'s child-welfare system, who stepped into the increasingly bitter access dispute last week.

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"I am pleased to report that the mediation process has resulted in a successful resolution of the issue respecting the confidentiality of cabinet documents that the representative for children and youth may review," Mr. Hughes said in a statement.

He said that a protocol agreement between the two sides will be signed later today but he did not release details of the give-and-take aspect of the talks.

Children's watchdog Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond took the government to court after she was denied access to cabinet documents she said she needed to do an audit of a child welfare program.

She won, forcing the government to re-think a proposed amendment that would limit her access to cabinet documents in the future.

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