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A large fire burns at the Lakeland Mills sawmill in Prince George, B.C., on Tuesday April 24, 2012. An explosion rocked the sawmill just before 10 p.m. local time setting off a fire that engulfed the facility. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Johnson (ANDREW JOHNSON/Andrew Johnson/The Canadian Press)
A large fire burns at the Lakeland Mills sawmill in Prince George, B.C., on Tuesday April 24, 2012. An explosion rocked the sawmill just before 10 p.m. local time setting off a fire that engulfed the facility. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Johnson (ANDREW JOHNSON/Andrew Johnson/The Canadian Press)

'Down-to-earth' supervisor dies after 'giant fireball' explosion at B.C. sawmill Add to ...

A 43-year-old shift supervisor suffered fatal injuries when a Prince George sawmill exploded in what the coroners’ service described as a “giant fireball” on Monday night.

The B.C Coroners Service has confirmed that Alan Little of Prince George was the sole fatality in the explosion and fire at the Lakeland sawmill in Prince George at about 9:45 p.m. on Monday

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Mr. Little was taken to the University Hospital of Northern BC immediately after the blast, but died there several hours later at 5:30 p.m.

John Neilson, a forklift operator who was working the shift when the explosion occurred, remembered Mr. Little fondly, as a former laborer who had become a supervisor in the last two to three years. He said Mr. Little was married, but did not believe he had any children.

“He was a down-to-earth person, easy to get along with,” said Mr. Neilson.

“Everybody is in shock and disbelief,” said Frank Everitt, president of the regional United Steelworkers local. “Nobody has got a handle on what happened. They just know there was a huge explosion and it was heard kilometres away from the facility.

“The explosion happened and walls were taken down and flooring erupted underneath folks that were in the lunchroom. Subsequently they all got out.”

Mr. Everitt said the tragedy was especially sobering because it came after a January explosion that killed two workers at the Babine Forest Products in Burns Lake, about 230 kilometres northwest of Prince George.

“I said after Burns Lake I didn’t want to see anything like this ever again,” said Mr. Everitt.

But he said now that he won’t speculate on causes before the inevitable investigations have provided answers. The fire at Burns Lake remains under investigation, and no cause has been confirmed. Workers are worried, said Mr. Everitt.

“There is the overall concern for folks who work in the forest industry because we have had one and now we have had a second one. Certainly the emotions are there, and people are saying `We have to find the cause and make sure this doesn’t happen.’”

In an update, the Northern Health Authority disclosed that four patients injured in the. explosion – described by a B.C. coroner’s service statement as a “giant fireball” – and subsequent fire at the Lakeland Sawmill have been transferred by air ambulance from Prince George – three to Vancouver, one to Victoria and one to Edmonton.

Six patients remain at the university hospital in serious condition. Thirteen have been treated and released.

Donita Kuzma, the regional coroner for the Northern Region, said all workers have been accounted for, and none are missing at the facility, located on a square-kilometre property. The fire has consumed a main mill on the property, but a nearby planer mill is untouched.

According to Sinclar Group Forest Products, which owns the mill, there were 24 employees working in the sawmill at the time of the incident, with a further 16 employees in the adjoining planer mill and four working in the mill’s yard.

Premier Christy Clark offered the provinces’ support to Prince George, referring, in particular, to the family of the worker who died from his injuries.

She also paid tribute to Prince George for its response to the disaster.

“Emergency officials managed to keep the fire from spreading under extremely adverse conditions, neighbours rushed onto the scene to offer their assistance and health officials worked through the night treating the injured,” Ms. Clark said in a statement.

“I want Mayor Shari Green to know that her city has the full support of our government as they persevere through this terrible time.”

RCMP Corporal Craig Douglass said Tuesday morning that firefighters were making some advances on the fire.

“Firefighters are ahead of where they thought they would be in terms of the fire being extinguished,” said Cpl. Douglass, adding in the hours after the Monday night explosion crews had thought it would take 24 hours to control the fire.

“Now it is being extinguished more quickly than expected,” he said.

He said there was no immediate prospect of sending in investigators to begin trying to figure out what happened.

“Because of all the elements inside the sawmill, including compressed gases and sawmill dust, some things could be difficult to put out, but the best case is we’re able to put it out today.”

Ms. Kuzma said the investigation will involve the coroners’ service, the Prince George fire department, the RCMP and WorkSafeBC.

“This will take time to investigate, months. It’s just the complexity of the investigation,” said Ms. Kuzma, who was among the coroners’ staff investigating the January explosion and fire that killed two workers at the Babine Forest Products in Burns Lake, about 230 kilometres northwest of Prince George.

No cause has been determined for the Burns Lake incident, which left 250 workers without jobs.

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