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Tegan and Sara are joining fun. in West Vancouver for one last summer music bash. (Lindsey Byrnes)
Tegan and Sara are joining fun. in West Vancouver for one last summer music bash. (Lindsey Byrnes)

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The days are growing shorter, the fall rains are soon to arrive, and for most it’s back to work come Tuesday, but music lovers can get one last blast of summer with a West Van waterfront show by two of indie music’s biggest acts. Best known for their Grammy-winning pop anthem We Are Young and singles Some Nights and Carry On, New York trio Fun (or fun.) has spent the summer hitting top fests and outdoor venues, among them the White House on July 4.

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Joining them are Tegan and Sara, the veteran Canadian indie duo whose pop-heavy, arena-ready album Heartthrob landed the twin sisters on the shortlist for the prestigious Polaris Music Prize – and even on stage with Taylor Swift last week in L.A. (The country megastar told the crowd the album was “one of my favourites of all time.”)

Both bands have been plying the music biz for well over a decade, but both have had banner years, drawing broad critical praise and ever-larger crowds.

“We’ve been doing this for 12 years and we’ve seen every side of this industry and played to zero people and had no one buy our albums,” fun.’s Jack Antonoff said after scooping two Grammys this year.

“And these moments, whether it’s drawing big crowds or winning a Grammy, everything lately is a culmination of what we’ve been through. It’s amazing … to have it all bubble up.”

But while both acts offer plenty of summer-sweet pop hooks, and songs about love and heartbreak, they are also outspoken about human rights, in particular gay equality, and have teamed up with the Ally Coalition on tour.

“I think it’s the job of artists to speak up. We’re supposed to be the ones thinking in the future. We’re supposed to be the ones who [care], and who are the opposite of oppressors,” Mr. Antonoff said. “It feels like part of the job.”

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