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Cyclist Chris Bruntlett rides his bike on the 7th Avenue bikeway in Vancouver, June 21, 2012. (DARRYL DYCK For The Globe and Mail)
Cyclist Chris Bruntlett rides his bike on the 7th Avenue bikeway in Vancouver, June 21, 2012. (DARRYL DYCK For The Globe and Mail)

Kitsilano bike-path meeting put on hold Add to ...

A planned community meeting to discuss proposed changes to Kitsilano bike routes was cancelled over the weekend after the number of people planning to attend topped the capacity of the restaurant where the event was to be held.

But the city, which was unable to arrange an alternative venue by Monday evening – when the meeting was to have taken place at the Sunset Grill restaurant – remains open to talking to residents at another time and place, Councillor Heather Deal said Monday.

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“And there are some options still on the table. I think that people realize that the decision is getting closer and that’s why people are getting more and more interested and more engaged, because they recognize that we are getting close to a decision,” Ms. Deal said. “If people have questions, they should feel more than welcome to ask them. I’ve been very pleased with the input we have had so far, and I want to make sure it is based on correct information.”

The Point Grey Road-Cornwall Avenue project, part of the city’s Transportation 2040 Plan, would involve changes to streets and bike routes between the south end of the Burrard Street Bridge and Jericho Beach Park, with an eye to improving safety and easing choke points such as where cyclists come off the Burrard Street Bridge onto narrow, busy Cornwall Avenue.

Proposed changes include funnelling more bike traffic onto York Avenue, widening sidewalks and reducing street parking in some areas. Council is expected to vote on the changes in July.

Proposals do not include separated bike lines on Cornwall Avenue – an option that was considered but ruled out as a result of traffic and transit concerns.

“We heard very clearly from the businesses on Cornwall that the parking was very important to them,” Ms. Deal said. “There is little parking in the area, unlike in downtown. And although most of their customers don’t use cars to get there, they do need that small amount of parking that they have.”

Some of the recent concerns have come from residents of York Avenue, who note there is an existing bike route on Third Avenue.

Also on Monday, Vancouver Park Board was to consider a motion for interim bike safety measures on the Stanley Park causeway. A cyclist was killed on the Stanley Park causeway on May 25 after she fell into traffic and was struck by a bus.

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