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Gwaii Haanas superintendent Ernie Gladstone stands in an empty cliff pool after an earthquake off the coast of British Columbia. (PARKS CANADA/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Gwaii Haanas superintendent Ernie Gladstone stands in an empty cliff pool after an earthquake off the coast of British Columbia. (PARKS CANADA/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Quake-damaged Haida Gwaii hot springs slowly trickling back to life Add to ...

Nature appears to be slowly turning on the taps again at some B.C. hot springs damaged by an earthquake last fall.

Water flow and thermal activity at four naturally-sourced pools in Gwaii Haanas National Park on Haida Gwaii off B.C.’s northwest coast stopped in October following a 7.7-magnitude earthquake and aftershocks.

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The hot springs have been used by first nations for decades to cook seafood, are known for their healing properties and are popular with kayakers and tourists.

Parks Canada says agency scientists installed heat-detecting devices at the hot springs after the water stopped flowing.

Scientists have now observed hot water seeps near two of the pools, and Parks Canada says thermal activity has been detected in all areas where it once occurred.

The agency calls the development promising, although it can’t confirm the hot springs will return to normal.

 

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