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The Western Sandpiper, seen here in Delta, B.C., on April 28, 2014, is one of the most abundant shorebirds in North America. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)
The Western Sandpiper, seen here in Delta, B.C., on April 28, 2014, is one of the most abundant shorebirds in North America. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Caught on camera: Sandpipers flock to B.C. mud flats en route to Alaska Add to ...

The mud flats surrounding Delta, B.C., are a magnet to the giant flocks of Western Sandpiper that feed along the water line, and to bird watchers who try to catch a glimpse of the tiny timid bird during the yearly migration from South America to Alaska every spring. The flight of the birds, which individually weigh less than an iPhone, create giant waves in the sky. Between now and the first week of May, hundreds of thousands of the birds will make their way through the flats.

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